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AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES.

AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES.

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1 ALEXANDER, AMY. The Farrakhan Factor: African-american Writers On Leadership, Nationhood, And Minister Louis Farrakhan.
Grove Press, New York: 1997. 0802135978 / 9780802135971 s Softcover. Good condition. 
"Honest, unsparing and thorough in [its] discussion not only of Farrakhan, but also of the Nation of Islam, black nationalism and the state of race relations." - The Boston Globe 
Price: 14.49 USD
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2 ASANTE, MOLEFI KETE. Afrocentricity.
Africa World Press, Trenton: 1996 0865430675 / 9780865430679 Eighth Printing. s Softcover. Good condition. 

Price: 23.04 USD
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3 BAILEY, CORNELIA WITH CHRISTENA, BLEDSOE. God, Dr. Buzzard, And The Bolito Man: A Saltwater Geechee Talks About Life On Sapelo Island.
Doubleday and Company, Inc., New York: 2000. 0385493762 / 9780385493765 First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 
In this beautiful cultural memoir, Sapelo Island native Cornelia Walker Bailey tells the fascinating history of her remarkable and threatened Georgia homeland. Off the coast of Georgia, a small close-knit community of African-Americans traces their lineage to enslaved West Africans. Living on a barrier island in almost total isolation, the people of Sapelo have been able to do what most others could not: They have preserved many of the folkways of their forebears in West Africa, believing in "signs and spirits and all kinds of magic." Cornelia Walker Bailey, a direct descendant of Bilali, the most famous and powerful enslaved African to inhabit the islan, is the keeper of cultural secrets and the sage of Sapelo. In words that are pooetic and straight to the point, she tells the story of her Sapelo - including the Geechee belief in the equal power of God, "Dr. Buzzard" (voodoo), and the "Bolito Man" (luck). 
Price: 21.76 USD
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4 BECK, JANE C. Daisy Turner's Kin: An African American Family Saga.
University of Illinois Press, Urbana and Chicago: 2015. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The oral history of an American family from Africa to the twentieth century A daughter of freed African American slaves, Daisy Turner became a living repository of history. The family narrative entrusted to her--"a well-polished artifact, an heirloom that had been carefully preserved"--began among the Yoruba in West Africa and continued with her own long lifetime. In 1983, folklorist Jane Beck began to interview Turner, then one hundred years old and still relating four generations of oral history. Beck uses Turner's storytelling to build the Turner family saga, using at its foundation the oft-repeated touchstone stories at the heart of their experiences: the abduction into slavery of Turner's African ancestors; Daisy's father learning to read; his return as a soldier to his former plantation to kill the overseer; Daisy's childhood stand against racism; and her family's life in Vermont. Beck weaves in historical research and offers a folklorist's perspective on oral history and the hazards and uses of memory. Jane C. Beck is Executive Director Emeritus and Founder of the Vermont Folklife Center. She received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Center for Vermont Research at the University of Vermont in 2011. "Folklorist Beck's story of the Turner family's transition from freedom to slavery to freedom again is a marvel of scholarly storytelling. . . . An engrossing American tale."--Publisher's Weekly "I met and filmed Daisy Turner for my Civil War series and was struck by her vibrancy and the power of her voice. How fortunate we are that Jane Beck was able to both record and authenticate her family narrative. It allows us new insights into the experience of four generations of a family who maintained their identity and self-respect in spite of the dehumanizing circumstances they lived through. What an engaging and powerful story!"--Ken Burns, filmmaker "This amazing true story should be required reading for anyone who wants to understand American history. Jane Beck's seminal book, built upon decades of rare historical research combined with rich oral narratives, reads like a vivid novel. The central narrative portrays three generations of Turner men and women whose . . . creativity, resilience, and spiritual strength are at the root of their survival. Drawing upon letters, photos, local records, and oral recollection, the author has woven this compelling, necessary tale that in praise of Daisy Turner's determined truth-telling, encourages a reconsideration of traditional African American histories."--Ronne Hartfield, author of Another Way Home: The Tangled Roots of Race in One Chicago Family "Beck has done an impeccable job of verifying the memories of Daisy Turner, clarifying what in her oral history is simply part of family lore and what is historically significant and accurate."--W. Ralph Eubanks, author of The House at the End of the Road: The Story of Three Generations of an Interracial Family in the American South "A powerful vindication and thoughtful explication of the power and persistence of an oral tradition. Anchoring her work in long-term relationships and stellar research both in the library and in the field, Jane Beck shows how folk traditions, and the past, live on and shape our lives."--Debora Kodish, founder and former director of the Philadelphia Folklore Project Publication of this book is supported by grants from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the L. J. and Mary C. Skaggs Folklore Fund. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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5 BECK, JANE C. Daisy Turner's Kin: An African American Family Saga.
University of Illinois Press, Urbana and Chicago: 2015. h Hardcover as issued without dustjacket. Brand new book. 
The oral history of an American family from Africa to the twentieth century A daughter of freed African American slaves, Daisy Turner became a living repository of history. The family narrative entrusted to her--"a well-polished artifact, an heirloom that had been carefully preserved"--began among the Yoruba in West Africa and continued with her own long lifetime. In 1983, folklorist Jane Beck began to interview Turner, then one hundred years old and still relating four generations of oral history. Beck uses Turner's storytelling to build the Turner family saga, using at its foundation the oft-repeated touchstone stories at the heart of their experiences: the abduction into slavery of Turner's African ancestors; Daisy's father learning to read; his return as a soldier to his former plantation to kill the overseer; Daisy's childhood stand against racism; and her family's life in Vermont. Beck weaves in historical research and offers a folklorist's perspective on oral history and the hazards and uses of memory. Jane C. Beck is Executive Director Emeritus and Founder of the Vermont Folklife Center. She received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Center for Vermont Research at the University of Vermont in 2011. "Folklorist Beck's story of the Turner family's transition from freedom to slavery to freedom again is a marvel of scholarly storytelling. . . . An engrossing American tale."--Publisher's Weekly "I met and filmed Daisy Turner for my Civil War series and was struck by her vibrancy and the power of her voice. How fortunate we are that Jane Beck was able to both record and authenticate her family narrative. It allows us new insights into the experience of four generations of a family who maintained their identity and self-respect in spite of the dehumanizing circumstances they lived through. What an engaging and powerful story!"--Ken Burns, filmmaker "This amazing true story should be required reading for anyone who wants to understand American history. Jane Beck's seminal book, built upon decades of rare historical research combined with rich oral narratives, reads like a vivid novel. The central narrative portrays three generations of Turner men and women whose . . . creativity, resilience, and spiritual strength are at the root of their survival. Drawing upon letters, photos, local records, and oral recollection, the author has woven this compelling, necessary tale that in praise of Daisy Turner's determined truth-telling, encourages a reconsideration of traditional African American histories."--Ronne Hartfield, author of Another Way Home: The Tangled Roots of Race in One Chicago Family "Beck has done an impeccable job of verifying the memories of Daisy Turner, clarifying what in her oral history is simply part of family lore and what is historically significant and accurate."--W. Ralph Eubanks, author of The House at the End of the Road: The Story of Three Generations of an Interracial Family in the American South "A powerful vindication and thoughtful explication of the power and persistence of an oral tradition. Anchoring her work in long-term relationships and stellar research both in the library and in the field, Jane Beck shows how folk traditions, and the past, live on and shape our lives."--Debora Kodish, founder and former director of the Philadelphia Folklore Project Publication of this book is supported by grants from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the L. J. and Mary C. Skaggs Folklore Fund. 
Price: 90.25 USD
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6 BONE, ROBERT & COURAGE, RICHARD. The Muse In Bronzeville: African American Creative Expression In Chicago, 1932-1950.
Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick: 2011. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The Muse in Bronzeville, a dynamic reappraisal of a neglected period in African American cultural history, is the first comprehensive critical study of the creative awakening that occurred on Chicago's South Side from the early 1930s to the cold war. Coming of age during the hard Depression years and in the wake of the Great Migration, this generation of Black creative artists produced works of literature, music, and visual art fully comparable in distinction and scope to the achievements of the Harlem Renaissance. This highly informative and accessible work, enhanced with reproductions of paintings of the same period, examines Black Chicago's "Renaissance" through richly anecdotal profiles of such figures as Richard Wright, Gwendolyn Brooks, Margaret Walker, Charles White, Gordon Parks, Horace Cayton, Muddy Waters, Mahalia Jackson, and Katherine Dunham. Robert Bone and Richard A. Courage make a powerful case for moving Chicago's Bronzeville, long overshadowed by New York's Harlem, from a peripheral to a central position within African American and American studies. Robert Bone (1924-2007) was a professor of languages and literature at Columbia University Teachers College and a pioneering scholar of African American literature. He was best known for The Negro Novel in America, Richard Wright, and Down Home: Origins of the Afro-American Short Story. His seminal essay "Richard Wright and the Chicago Renaissance" continues to be cited extensively in studies of early twentieth-century African American writing. Richard A. Courage is a professor of English at Westchester Community College/SUNY. 
Price: 28.45 USD
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7 BROADNAX,SAMUEL L.; OSUR, ALAN M. (FOREWORD). Blue Skies, Black Wings: African American Pioneers Of Aviation.
University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln: 2008. First Nebraska Paperback Printing. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
At the age of seventeen, Samuel L. Broadnax, enamored with flying, enlisted and trained as a pilot at the Tuskegee Army Air Base. Although he left the Air Corps at the end of the Second World War, his experiences inspired him to talk with other pilots and black pioneers of aviation. Blue Skies, Black Wings recounts the history of African Americans in the skies from the very beginnings of manned flight. From Charles Wesley Peters, who flew his own plane in 1911, and Eugene Bullard, a black American pilot with the French in World War I, to the 1945 Freeman Field mutiny against segregationist policies in the Air Corps, Broadnax paints a vivid picture of the people who fought oppression to make the skies their own. Samuel L. Broadnax graduated from Tuskegee Army Air Base with Class-45A in March 1945 as a fighter pilot. One of the celebrated Tuskegee Airmen, he was assigned to the 332nd Replacement Training Unit. He later attended Yuba College, Howard University, and the University of California, Berkeley, and has worked as a newscaster and journalist. In 2006 the Tuskegee Airmen were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor. "Broadnax provides a long-needed book. . . . He tells what it was like to be an African American man of courage and skill in the racist south and U.S. Army of that time. . . . Broadnax paints a clear picture of how those young men earned their commissions as second lieutenants in the U.S. Army Air Force of more than six decades ago. Their story is well worth reading now. . . . Highly recommended."—Choice "[Broadnax's] own love of flying is evident in his recollections of the rarefied status of flying in the early days, and his own personal struggle to garner the experience for himself despite the racial limitations of the time."—Booklist 
Price: 16.34 USD
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8 BRUNDAGE, W. FITZHUGH (EDITOR). Beyond Blackface: African Americans And The Creation Of American Popular Culture, 1890-1930.
The University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill & London: 2011. H. Eugene and Lillian Youngs Lehman Series. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
This collection of thirteen essays, edited by historian W. Fitzhugh Brundage, brings together original work from sixteen scholars in various disciplines, ranging from theater and literature to history and music, to address the complex roles of black performers, entrepreneurs, and consumers in American mass culture during the early twentieth century. Moving beyond the familiar territory of blackface and minstrelsy, these essays present a fresh look at the history of African Americans and mass culture. With subjects ranging from representations of race in sheet music illustrations to African American interest in Haitian culture, Beyond Blackface recovers the history of forgotten or obscure cultural figures and shows how these historical actors played a role in the creation of American mass culture. The essays explore the predicament that blacks faced at a time when white supremacy crested and innovations in consumption, technology, and leisure made mass culture possible. Underscoring the importance and complexity of race in the emergence of mass culture, Beyond Blackface depicts popular culture as a crucial arena in which African Americans struggled to secure a foothold as masters of their own representation and architects of the nation's emerging consumer society. The contributors are: Davarian L. Baldwin, Trinity College W. Fitzhugh Brundage, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Clare Corbould, University of Sydney Susan Curtis, Purdue University Stephanie Dunson, Williams College Lewis A. Erenberg, Loyola University Chicago Stephen Garton, University of Sydney John M. Giggie, University of Alabama Grace Elizabeth Hale, University of Virginia Robert Jackson, University of Tulsa David Krasner, Emerson College Thomas Riis, University of Colorado at Boulder Stephen Robertson, University of Sydney John Stauffer, Harvard University Graham White, University of Sydney Shane White, University of Sydney W. Fitzhugh Brundage is William B. Umstead Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. "This first-rate collection of essays seeks to move conversations about black performance, black culture, and the embodiment of both beyond the heretofore 'comfortable' terrain of blackface and minstrelsy. It does so with resounding success. Bravo to the essayists of this excellent volume." - Jonathan Scott Holloway, Yale University "This anthology deftly illuminates the revealing innovation and experimentation that characterized black culture, American popular culture, and the fruits of their cross-pollination in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. These rich essays make abundantly clear the extraordinary impact of African Americans and African American culture on the making of modern American popular culture." - Waldo E. Martin Jr., University of California, Berkeley 
Price: 33.25 USD
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9 BRYANT, EARLE V. (EDITOR). Byline, Richard Wright: Articles From The Daily Worker And New Masses.
University of Missouri Press, Columbia: 2015. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
A writer perhaps best known for the revolutionary works Black Boy and Native Son, Richard Wright also worked as a journalist during one of the most explosive periods of the 20th century. From 1937 to 1938, Wright turned out more than two hundred articles for the Daily Worker, the newspaper that served as the voice of the American Communist Party. Byline, Richard Wright assembles more than one hundred of those articles plus two of Wright's essays from New Masses, revealing to readers the early work of an American icon. As both reporter and Harlem bureau chief, Wright covered most of the major and minor events, personalities, and issues percolating through the local, national, and global scenes in the late 1930s. Because the Daily Worker wasn't a mainstream paper, editors gave Wright free rein to cover the stories he wanted, and he tackled issues that no one else covered. Although his peers criticized his journalistic writing, these articles offer revealing portraits of Depression-era America rendered in solid, vivid prose. Featuring Earle V. Bryant's informative, detailed introduction and commentary contextualizing the compiled articles, Byline, Richard Wright provides insight into the man before he achieved fame as a novelist, short story writer, and internationally recognized voice of social protest. This collection opens new territory in Wright studies, and fans of Wright's novels will delight in discovering the lost material of this literary great. Earle V. Bryant is Professor of English at the University of New Orleans where he teaches American and African American literature. He has written extensively on Richard Wright, Charles Chesnutt, and Bernard Malamud and is at work on a book on Dorothy West. A native of Philadelphia, Bryant now lives in New Orleans. 
Price: 57.00 USD
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10 BUTTERS, JR., GERALD R. From Sweetback To Super Fly: Race And Film Audiences In Chicago's Loop.
University of Missouri Press, Columbia: 2015. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Racial politics and capitalism found a way to blend together in 1970s Chicago in the form of movie theaters targeted specifically toward African Americans. In From Sweetback to Super Fly, Gerald Buttersexamines the movie theaters in Chicago's Loop that became, as he describes them, "black spaces" during the early 1970s with theater managers making an effort to gear their showings toward the African American community by using black-themed and blaxploitation films. Butters covers the wide range of issues that influenced the theaters, from changing racial patterns to the increasingly decrepit state of Chicago's inner city and the pressure on businesses and politicians alike to breathe life into the dying area. Through his extensive research, Butters provides an in-depth look at this phenomenon, delving into an area that has not previously been explored. His close examination of how black-themed films were marketed and how theaters showing these films tried to draw in crowds sheds light on race issues both from an industrial standpoint on the side of the theaters and movie producers, as well as from a cultural standpoint on the side of the moviegoers and the city of Chicago as a whole. Butters provides a wealth of information on a very interesting yet underexamined part of history, making From Sweetback to Super Fly a supremely enjoyable and informative book. Gerald R. Butters, Jr., is Professor of History at Aurora University. His publications include Banned in Kansas: Motion Picture Censorship, 1915-1966 (University of Missouri Press). 
Price: 57.00 USD
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11 CADDOO, CARA. Envisioning Freedom: Cinema And The Building Of Modern Black Life.
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts and London England: 2014. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Viewing turn-of-the century African American history through the lens of cinema, Envisioning Freedom examines the forgotten history of early black film exhibition during the era of mass migration and Jim Crow. By embracing the new medium of moving pictures at the turn of the twentieth century, black Americans forged a collective—if fraught—culture of freedom. In Cara Caddoo's perspective-changing study, African Americans emerge as pioneers of cinema from the 1890s to the 1920s. Across the South and Midwest, moving pictures presented in churches, lodges, and schools raised money and created shared social experiences for black urban communities. As migrants moved northward, bound for Chicago and New York, cinema moved with them. Along these routes, ministers and reformers, preaching messages of racial uplift, used moving pictures as an enticement to attract followers. But as it gained popularity, black cinema also became controversial. Facing a losing competition with movie houses, once-supportive ministers denounced the evils of the "colored theater." Onscreen images sparked arguments over black identity and the meaning of freedom. In 1910, when boxing champion Jack Johnson became the world's first black movie star, representation in film vaulted to the center of black concerns about racial progress. Black leaders demanded self-representation and an end to cinematic mischaracterizations which, they charged, violated the civil rights of African Americans. In 1915, these ideas both led to the creation of an industry that produced "race films" by and for black audiences and sparked the first mass black protest movement of the twentieth century. Cara Caddoo is Assistant Professor of American Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington. "According to Cara Caddoo's lively, readable, richly detailed new history of African-American film cultures at the turn of the 20th century, the cinema was a central motor force for the formation of racial identity and community in the era of Jim Crow. Envisioning Freedom, which packs a tremendous amount of fascinating incident into a relatively short page count, introduces us to black church leaders in the Midwest who invested heavily in film technology as a tool for their ministries, embattled black theater owners in the segregated South, and the pioneers of African-American independent cinema at home and abroad. And Caddoo's account of the mass protest movement that arose against D.W. Griffith's racist epic The Birth of a Nation provides a moving case study in the age of Ferguson and the New Jim Crow."—Phillip Maciak, Slate "In this brilliant, pathbreaking work, Caddoo reveals how moving pictures transformed black modern sensibility and how rural migrants envisioned new meanings of freedom. Richly detailed and filled with stunningly original insights, this bold and ambitious book sets a new standard for studies of black migration, urban history, and cinema."—Thavolia Glymph, author of Out of the House of Bondage "This is a big, bold book and an easy, seductive read. Caddoo, a talented historian, traces the lost plotlines of mass culture, political struggle, and public space in the age of Jim Crow, plotlines that have been buried for too long beneath more familiar legal dramas and movement histories."—Matthew Pratt Guterl, author of Josephine Baker and the Rainbow Tribe 
Price: 33.25 USD
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12 CLEMONS, MICHAEL L. African Americans In Global Affairs.
University Press of New England: 2010. First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
The repression historically faced by African Americans has had an important effect on the nature of the group's participation in foreign affairs. This book offers a much-needed and long-overdue survey of the field, setting the stage for further exploration and analysis. Chapters discuss the Congressional Black Caucus and TransAfrica Forum; African American political organizations and Africa; Colin Powell and Condoleezza Rice; the evaporation of strong black voices in events such as those in Rwanda and Darfur; and self-critical Pan Africanism. A prologue by Michael L. Clemons and introductory chapter by Ronald W. Walters provide new ways to conceptualize these international perspectives, while Clemons's epilogue speculates on the opportunities and challenges offered by the presidency of Barack Obama. 
Price: 80.75 USD
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13 CLEMONS, MICHAEL L. African Americans In Global Affairs.
University Press of New England: 2010. First Edition. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The repression historically faced by African Americans has had an important effect on the nature of the group's participation in foreign affairs. This book offers a much-needed and long-overdue survey of the field, setting the stage for further exploration and analysis. Chapters discuss the Congressional Black Caucus and TransAfrica Forum; African American political organizations and Africa; Colin Powell and Condoleezza Rice; the evaporation of strong black voices in events such as those in Rwanda and Darfur; and self-critical Pan Africanism. A prologue by Michael L. Clemons and introductory chapter by Ronald W. Walters provide new ways to conceptualize these international perspectives, while Clemons's epilogue speculates on the opportunities and challenges offered by the presidency of Barack Obama. 
Price: 33.25 USD
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14 DICKERSON, DEBRA J. The End Of Blackness: Returning The Souls Of Black Folk To Their Rightful Owners.
Pantheon Books, New York: 2003. 0375421572 / 9780375421570 First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Very good condition. 
In this unstinting, keen, and brutally funny manifesto, Debra Dickerson critiques "race" as a bankrupt scientific and social construct, exposing the insidious, manipulative racial myths and prejudices still held by American blacks and whites. She examines much statistical rubbish that passes for sociological fact, the purposeful corruption of American history, and the resulting social ills and pathologies bedeviling both the black and white communities. Includes an Index. "It is a startling thing to hear an American speak as frankly and un-self-servingly about race as Dickerson does." - The New York Times 
Price: 22.04 USD
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15 DOLINAR, BRIAN (EDITOR). The Negro In Illinois: The Wpa Papers.
University of Illinois Press, Urbana and Chicago: 2015. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
An extraordinary document of the African American experience A major document of African American participation in the struggles of the Depression, The Negro in Illinois was produced by a special division of the Illinois Writers' Project, one of President Roosevelt's Works Progress Administration programs. The Federal Writers' Project helped to sustain "New Negro" artists during the 1930s and gave them a newfound social consciousness that is reflected in their writing. Headed by Harlem Renaissance poet Arna Bontemps and white proletarian writer Jack Conroy, The Negro in Illinois employed major black writers living in Chicago during the 1930s, including Richard Wright, Margaret Walker, Katherine Dunham, Fenton Johnson, Frank Yerby, and Richard Durham. The authors chronicled the African American experience in Illinois from the beginnings of slavery to Lincoln's emancipation and the Great Migration, with individual chapters discussing various aspects of public and domestic life, recreation, politics, religion, literature, and performing arts. After the project was canceled in 1942, most of the writings went unpublished for more than half a century--until now. Working closely with archivist Michael Flug to select and organize the book, editor Brian Dolinar compiled The Negro in Illinois from papers at the Vivian G. Harsh Collection of Afro-American History and Literature at the Carter G. Woodson Library in Chicago. Dolinar provides an informative introduction and epilogue which explain the origins of the project and place it in the context of the Black Chicago Renaissance. Making available an invaluable perspective on African American life, this volume represents a publication of immense historical and literary importance. Brian Dolinar is a scholar of African American literature and culture from the Depression era. He is the author of The Black Cultural Front: Black Writers and Artists of the Depression Generation. "Chicago had a vibrant black community, perhaps equal to that of Harlem, which makes the Illinois volume both important and interesting. Highly recommended."--Choice "An able and rich retelling of the story of African-American migration, literature, and culture before World War II."--Book News Inc. "A significant accomplishment. Not only does it bring to light a range of wonderful material on a variety of topics (the Underground Railroad, work, churches, professions, social life, and social uplift, literature, music, the theater, etc.), but the wonderful introduction and Dolinar's fine editing skills also make the book a significant contribution to scholarship."--The Annals of Iowa "In bringing out the until now largely unknown The Negro in Illinois: The WPA Papers, African American literary and cultural studies scholar Brian Dolinar has done an invaluable service for those interested in Great Depression-period black culture. This work should be on the shelf of all who are interested in the study of African American literature, politics, economics, and culture. Dolinar's The Negro in Illinois is unquestionably indispensable."--Journal of Illinois History "For decades, scholars and enthusiasts of the Black Midwest have lamented the abortive end to the WPA's The Negro in Illinois project, the most ambitious New Deal study of African American life and history. Now this treasure can enjoy the wide readership it always deserved. Working with the Harsh Research Collection and other archives across the country, editor Brian Dolinar has located all twenty-nine chapters of the original survey, written by the cream of the Chicago Renaissance generation, and he has supplemented their work with illuminating and helpful annotation. The result is equal parts epic, elegy, and captivating ledger of the contributions and circumstances of African Americans in Illinois, from frontier and slavery days to the emergence of the Black Metropolis. This volume is testament to the extraordinary capacities of African Americans in Chicago and Illinois, and to how their story encapsulates that of a nation."--Adam Green, University of Chicago "Brian Dolinar's efforts are impressive along two scholarly fronts. He has presented a first-class introduction to the monumental New Deal Era's writing project to preserve black Chicago's history and culture that was embodied in the research and writings of Arna Bontemps, Jack Conroy, Richard Wright, Margaret Walker, and others. Then, he has untiringly resurrected all twenty-nine chapters of the historic Illinois Writers' Project labeled 'The Negro in Illinois,' providing posterity with long sought-after meanings of things past in the vaunted Black Metropolis of the early twentieth century."--Christopher Robert Reed, author of The Rise of Chicago's Black Metropolis, 1920-1929 "This landmark study provides a unique window onto the work of the Illinois unit of the Federal Writers' Project. A commendable work of historical recovery."--Richard Courage, coauthor of The Muse in Bronzeville: African American Creative Expression in Chicago, 1932-1950 "An exciting act of scholarly recovery. The Negro in Illinois papers, at long last available, are an invaluable guide to the role of American writers in crafting one of the first composite narratives of African American life. This dynamic volume shows us history from below in the making and being made."--Bill V. Mullen, coeditor of Afro Asia: Revolutionary Political and Cultural Connections between African Americans and Asian Americans 
Price: 26.84 USD
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16 DOLINAR, BRIAN (EDITOR). The Negro In Illinois: The Wpa Papers.
University of Illinois Press, Urbana and Chicago: 2013. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
An extraordinary document of the African American experience A major document of African American participation in the struggles of the Depression, The Negro in Illinois was produced by a special division of the Illinois Writers' Project, one of President Roosevelt's Works Progress Administration programs. The Federal Writers' Project helped to sustain "New Negro" artists during the 1930s and gave them a newfound social consciousness that is reflected in their writing. Headed by Harlem Renaissance poet Arna Bontemps and white proletarian writer Jack Conroy, The Negro in Illinois employed major black writers living in Chicago during the 1930s, including Richard Wright, Margaret Walker, Katherine Dunham, Fenton Johnson, Frank Yerby, and Richard Durham. The authors chronicled the African American experience in Illinois from the beginnings of slavery to Lincoln's emancipation and the Great Migration, with individual chapters discussing various aspects of public and domestic life, recreation, politics, religion, literature, and performing arts. After the project was canceled in 1942, most of the writings went unpublished for more than half a century--until now. Working closely with archivist Michael Flug to select and organize the book, editor Brian Dolinar compiled The Negro in Illinois from papers at the Vivian G. Harsh Collection of Afro-American History and Literature at the Carter G. Woodson Library in Chicago. Dolinar provides an informative introduction and epilogue which explain the origins of the project and place it in the context of the Black Chicago Renaissance. Making available an invaluable perspective on African American life, this volume represents a publication of immense historical and literary importance. Brian Dolinar is a scholar of African American literature and culture from the Depression era. He is the author of The Black Cultural Front: Black Writers and Artists of the Depression Generation. "Chicago had a vibrant black community, perhaps equal to that of Harlem, which makes the Illinois volume both important and interesting. Highly recommended."--Choice "An able and rich retelling of the story of African-American migration, literature, and culture before World War II."--Book News Inc. "A significant accomplishment. Not only does it bring to light a range of wonderful material on a variety of topics (the Underground Railroad, work, churches, professions, social life, and social uplift, literature, music, the theater, etc.), but the wonderful introduction and Dolinar's fine editing skills also make the book a significant contribution to scholarship."--The Annals of Iowa "In bringing out the until now largely unknown The Negro in Illinois: The WPA Papers, African American literary and cultural studies scholar Brian Dolinar has done an invaluable service for those interested in Great Depression-period black culture. This work should be on the shelf of all who are interested in the study of African American literature, politics, economics, and culture. Dolinar's The Negro in Illinois is unquestionably indispensable."--Journal of Illinois History "For decades, scholars and enthusiasts of the Black Midwest have lamented the abortive end to the WPA's The Negro in Illinois project, the most ambitious New Deal study of African American life and history. Now this treasure can enjoy the wide readership it always deserved. Working with the Harsh Research Collection and other archives across the country, editor Brian Dolinar has located all twenty-nine chapters of the original survey, written by the cream of the Chicago Renaissance generation, and he has supplemented their work with illuminating and helpful annotation. The result is equal parts epic, elegy, and captivating ledger of the contributions and circumstances of African Americans in Illinois, from frontier and slavery days to the emergence of the Black Metropolis. This volume is testament to the extraordinary capacities of African Americans in Chicago and Illinois, and to how their story encapsulates that of a nation."--Adam Green, University of Chicago "Brian Dolinar's efforts are impressive along two scholarly fronts. He has presented a first-class introduction to the monumental New Deal Era's writing project to preserve black Chicago's history and culture that was embodied in the research and writings of Arna Bontemps, Jack Conroy, Richard Wright, Margaret Walker, and others. Then, he has untiringly resurrected all twenty-nine chapters of the historic Illinois Writers' Project labeled 'The Negro in Illinois,' providing posterity with long sought-after meanings of things past in the vaunted Black Metropolis of the early twentieth century."--Christopher Robert Reed, author of The Rise of Chicago's Black Metropolis, 1920-1929 "This landmark study provides a unique window onto the work of the Illinois unit of the Federal Writers' Project. A commendable work of historical recovery."--Richard Courage, coauthor of The Muse in Bronzeville: African American Creative Expression in Chicago, 1932-1950 "An exciting act of scholarly recovery. The Negro in Illinois papers, at long last available, are an invaluable guide to the role of American writers in crafting one of the first composite narratives of African American life. This dynamic volume shows us history from below in the making and being made."--Bill V. Mullen, coeditor of Afro Asia: Revolutionary Political and Cultural Connections between African Americans and Asian Americans 
Price: 49.40 USD
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17 DU BOIS, W. E. B.; CHANDLER, NAHUM DIMITRI (EDITOR). The Problem Of The Color Line At The Turn Of The Twentieth Century: The Essential Early Essays.
Fordham University Press, New York: 2013. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
This volume assembles essential essays - some published only postumously, others obscure, another only recently translated - by W. E. B. Du Bois from 1894 to early 1906. 
Price: 33.49 USD
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18 DU BOIS, W. E. B.; CHANDLER, NAHUM DIMITRI (EDITOR). The Problem Of The Color Line At The Turn Of The Twentieth Century: The Essential Early Essays.
Fordham University Press, New York: 2013. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
This volume assembles essential essays - some published only postumously, others obscure, another only recently translated - by W. E. B. Du Bois from 1894 to early 1906. They show the first formulations of some of his most famous ideas, namely, "the veil," "double consciousness," and the "problem of the color line." 
Price: 128.25 USD
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19 DUMAS, JIMMY. 24 Reasons Why African Americans Suffer.
African American Images, Chicago: 1999. 0913543632 / 9780913543634 s Softcover. Good condition. 

Price: 14.01 USD
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20 FIELD, RON. African Peoples Of The Americas From Slavery To Civil Rights.
Oxford University Press, Oxford: 2005. 0521459117 / 9780521459112 s Softcover. Brand new book. 
African Peoples of the Americas offers a well-researched and stimulating approach to the study of the experiences of Black Americans in the Caribbean and the U. S., with a focus on slavery, emancipation, the civil rights movement, and the forging of new identities and cultures. It is written in an accessible style with an emphasis on primary source documents. Includes an Index. 
Price: 19.95 USD
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