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NATIVE AMERICANS.

NATIVE AMERICANS.

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41 BERTHRONG, DONALD J. The Southern Cheyennes.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
For almost fifty years George Bird Grinnell's great work The Fighting Cheyennes has stood unrevised and virtually unchallenged as the definitive account of the struggles of the Cheyenne Indians to preserve their way of life. Now Donald J. Berthrong has re-examined Grinnell's findings and searched historical records unavailable to or not used by Grinnell to verify or correct his conclusions. The result is this accurate, highly interesting account of the Cheyennes' life on the Great Plains, their system of government and religion, and their relation to the fur and hide trade during their last years of freedom. After nearly two centuries of fighting other Indians and whites for their lands, in the eighteenth century the Cheyenne's were forced to shift their range from the Minnesota River Valley to the Central and Southern Plains. From 1861 through 1875, they fought to maintain their free, nomadic existence. There were bloody wars with territorial forces and federal troops, and a few years of intermittent peace and retaliation (including the massacre at Sand Creek in 1864). Finally, after the intensive winter campaign of 1874-75, the fierce Southern Cheyenne's were brought to bay by the U.S. Army and herded onto a reservation in western Indian Territory (now Oklahoma). Their turbulent, colorful history related by Berthrong will interest the general reader as well as the historian and anthropologist. 
Price: 28.45 USD
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42 BIERHORST, JOHN (EDITOR). The Red Swan: Myths And Tales Of The American Indians.
Farrar, Straus & Giroux, New York: 1976. 0374513937 / 9780374513931 s Softcover. Good condition. 

Price: 9.03 USD
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43 BIGART, ROBERT J. Getting Good Crops: Economic And Diplomatic Survival Strategies Of The Montana Bitterroot Salish Indians 1870-1891.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2010. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
In 1870, the Bitterroot Salish Indians—called "Flatheads" by the first white explorers to encounter them—were a small tribe living on the western slope of the Northern Rocky Mountains in Montana Territory. Pressures on the Salish were intensifying during this time, from droughts and dwindling resources to aggressive neighboring tribes and Anglo-American expansion. In 1891, the economically impoverished Salish accepted government promises of assistance and retreated to the Flathead Reservation, more than sixty miles from their homeland. In Getting Good Crops, Robert J. Bigart examines the full range of available sources to explain how the Salish survived into the twentieth century, despite their small numbers, their military disadvantages, and the aggressive invasion of white settlers who greedily devoured their land and its natural resources. Bigart argues that a key to the survival of the Salish, from the early nineteenth century onward, was their diplomatic agility and willingness to form strategic alliances and friendships with non-Salish peoples. In doing so, the Salish navigated their way through multiple crises, relying more on their wits than on force. The Salish also took steps to sustain themselves economically. Although hunting and gathering had been their mainstay for centuries, the Salish began farming — "getting good crops" — to feed themselves because buffalo were becoming increasingly scarce. Raised on the Flathead Reservation himself, the author is seeking to convey the Salish story from their perspective, despite the paucity of written Salish testimony. What emerges is a picture — both inspiring and heartbreaking— of a people maintaining autonomy against all odds. 
Price: 37.95 USD
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44 BIRD, MARY BRAVE WITH RICHARD ERDOES. Ohitika Woman.
HarperPerennial, New York: 1994. First HarperPerennial Edition. s Softcover. Very good condition. 
Picking up where Lakota Woman, the winner of the American Book Award for 1991, left off, Ohitika Woman continues Mary Brave Bird's personal story of courage, anguish, and triumph. Coming home from Wounded Knee in 1973, married to American Indian Movement leader Leonard Crow Dog, Mary had hopes of a better life for her and her infant child. But as she writes in Ohitika Woman, "Trouble always finds me." "This rare Sioux feminist reveals more stark truth in this sequel to Lakota Woman, and the subject remains fascinating." 
Price: 6.60 USD
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45 BLACK-BEAR, DOROTHY AGUILERA & JOHN W. TIPPECONNIC (EDITORS). Voices Of Resistance And Renewal: Indigenous Leadership In Education.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2015. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Western education has often employed the bluntest of instruments in colonizing indigenous peoples, creating generations caught between Western culture and their own. Dedicated to the principle that leadership must come from within the communities to be led, Voices of Resistance and Renewal applies recent research on local, culture-specific learning to the challenges of education and leadership that Native people face. Bringing together both Native and non-Native scholars who have a wide range of experience in the practice and theory of indigenous education, editors Dorothy Aguilera-Black Bear and John Tippeconnic III focus on the theoretical foundations of indigenous leadership, the application of leadership theory to community contexts, and the knowledge necessary to prepare leaders for decolonizing education. The contributors draw on examples from tribal colleges, indigenous educational leadership programs, and the latest research in Canadian First Nation, Hawaiian, and U.S. American Indian communities. The chapters examine indigenous epistemologies and leadership within local contexts to show how Native leadership can be understood through indigenous lenses. Throughout, the authors consider political influences and educational frameworks that impede effective leadership, including the standards for success, the language used to deliver content, and the choice of curricula, pedagogical methods, and assessment tools. Voices of Resistance and Renewal provides a variety of philosophical principles that will guide leaders at all levels of education who seek to encourage self-determination and revitalization. It has important implications for the future of Native leadership, education, community, and culture, and for institutions of learning that have not addressed Native populations effectively in the past. 2 black-and-white Illustrations, 3 tables, 232 pages, 6" x 9". Dorothy Aguilera-Black Bear is an independent research consultant. John W. Tippeconnic III, Professor and Director of American Indian Studies at Arizona State University, is the co-editor of Next Steps: Research and Practice to Advance Indian Education. "Voices of Resistance and Renewal is a welcome addition to the growing literature on American Indian educational leadership. It brilliantly demonstrates how Native leaders have used Indigenous epistemologies as a way of practicing tribal sovereignty and self-determination, and it pushes back against those colonial mindsets that all too often interpret Native history and studies within a Western frame of understanding."—Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert, author of Education beyond the Mesas: Hopi Students at Sherman Institute, 1902-1929 
Price: 23.70 USD
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46 BLACKMAN, JON S. Oklahoma's Indian New Deal.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Among the New Deal programs that transformed American life in the 1930s was legislation known as the Indian New Deal, whose centerpiece was the Indian Reorganization Act (IRA) of 1934. Oddly, much of that law did not apply to Native residents of Oklahoma, even though a large percentage of the country's Native American population resided there in the 1930s and no other state was home to so many different tribes. The Oklahoma Indian Welfare Act (OIWA), passed by Congress in 1936, brought Oklahoma Indians under all of the IRA's provisions, but included other measures that applied only to Oklahoma's tribal population. This first book-length history of the OIWA explains the law's origins, enactment, implementation, and impact, and shows how the act played a unique role in the Indian New Deal. In the early decades of the twentieth century, white farmers, entrepreneurs, and lawyers used allotment policies and other legal means to gain control of thousands of acres of Indian land in Oklahoma. To counter the accumulated effects of this history, the OIWA specified how tribes could strengthen government by adopting new constitutions, and it enabled both tribes and individual Indians to obtain financial credit and land. Virulent opposition to the bill came from oil, timber, mining, farming, and ranching interests. Jon S. Blackman's narrative of the legislative battle reveals the roles of bureaucrats, politicians, and tribal members in drafting and enacting the law. Although the OIWA encouraged tribes to organize for political and economic purposes, it yielded mixed results. It did not produce a significant increase in Indian land ownership in Oklahoma, and only a small percentage of Indian households applied for OIWA loans. Yet the act increased member participation in tribal affairs, enhanced Indian relations with non-Indian businesses and government, promoted greater Indian influence in government programs—and, as Blackman shows, became a springboard to the self-determination movements of the 1950s and 1960s. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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47 BLAINE, MARTHA ROYCE. The Ioway Indians.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 1995. 
Illustrations: 26 b&w illus, 11 maps Published: 1995 Paperback ISBN: 384 pages, 6.75" x 10" Subject: American Indian Recent and Forthcoming Books Award-winning Books View Our Catalogs Visit Our Blog Find us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter Visit the OU Press Youtube Channel Join Our E-mail List Beginning with archaeological sites in northeast Iowa, Martha Royce Blaine traces Ioway history from ancient to modern times. In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, French, Spanish, and English traders vied for the tribe's favor and for permission to cross their lands. The Ioways fought in the French and Indian War in New York, the War of 1812, and the Civil War, but ultimately their influence waned as they slowly lost control of their sovereignty and territory. By the end of the nineteenth century, the Ioway were separated in reservations in Nebraska, Kansas, and Indian Territory. A new preface by the author carries the story to modern times and discusses the present status of and issues concerning the Oklahoma and the Kansas and Nebraska Ioways. 
Price: 28.22 USD
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48 BLEEKER, SONIA; SASAKI, KISA N. (ILLUSTRATIONS). The Maya: Indians Of Central America,
William Morrow and Co., New York: November 1963. Third Printing. h Hardcover with dustjacket and protective mylar covering. Reading copy. Library discard. 
The Maya Indians who lived in southeastern Mexico, Guatemala, and Honduras over 3,000 years ago, created a complex civilization that still fascinates us today. Tells of the ancient splendors of the Mayas in a narrative that is vivid and perceptive. Includes an Index. 
Price: 9.74 USD
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49 BOPP, JUDIE & MICHAEL; BROWN, LEE & LANE, PHIL (PRODUCED COLLABORATIVELY BY). The Sacred Tree: Reflections On Native American Spirituality.
Lotus Light, Wilkmot: 1985. 0941524582 / 9780941524582 Second Edition. s Softcover. Good condition. 
Created by the Four Winds Development Project, a Native American inter-tribal group, as a handbook of Native Spirituality for indigenous peoples all over the Americas and the World. Through the guidance of the tribal elders, Native values and traditions are being taught as the primary key to unlockiing the force that will move Native peoples on the path of their own development. The elders have prophesied that by returning to traditional values, native societies can be transformed. This transformation would then have a healing effect on our entir planet. This handbook is being used by the Four Worlds Development Project to eliminate widespread drug and alcohol abuse in tribal communities. 
Price: 13.54 USD
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50 BOWES, JOHN P. Land Too Good For Indians: Northern Indian Removal.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2016. Volume 13 in New Directions in Native American Studies series. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The history of Indian removal has often followed a single narrative arc, one that begins with President Andrew Jackson's Indian Removal Act of 1830 and follows the Cherokee Trail of Tears. In that conventional account, the Black Hawk War of 1832 encapsulates the experience of tribes in the territories north of the Ohio River. But Indian removal in the Old Northwest was much more complicated—involving many Indian peoples and more than just one policy, event, or politician. In Land Too Good for Indians, historian John P. Bowes takes a long-needed closer, more expansive look at northern Indian removal—and in so doing amplifies the history of Indian removal and of the United States. Bowes focuses on four case studies that exemplify particular elements of removal in the Old Northwest. He traces the paths taken by Delaware Indians in response to Euro-American expansion and U.S. policies in the decades prior to the Indian Removal Act. He also considers the removal experience among the Seneca-Cayugas, Wyandots, and other Indian communities in the Sandusky River region of northwestern Ohio. Bowes uses the 1833 Treaty of Chicago as a lens through which to examine the forces that drove the divergent removals of various Potawatomi communities from northern Illinois and Indiana. And in exploring the experiences of the Odawas and Ojibwes in Michigan Territory, he analyzes the historical context and choices that enabled some Indian communities to avoid relocation west of the Mississippi River. In expanding the context of removal to include the Old Northwest, and adding a portrait of Native communities there before, during, and after removal, Bowes paints a more accurate—and complicated—picture of American Indian history in the nineteenth century. Land Too Good for Indians reveals the deeper complexities of this crucial time in American history. 8 black-and-white Illustrations, 2 maps, 328 pages, 6.125" x 9.125". John P. Bowes is Associate Professor of History at Eastern Kentucky University and author of several books on Indian removal, including Exiles and Pioneers: Eastern Indians in the Trans-Mississippi West. 
Price: 24.65 USD
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51 BOWES, JOHN P. Land Too Good For Indians: Northern Indian Removal.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2016. Volume 13 in New Directions in Native American Studies series. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
The history of Indian removal has often followed a single narrative arc, one that begins with President Andrew Jackson's Indian Removal Act of 1830 and follows the Cherokee Trail of Tears. In that conventional account, the Black Hawk War of 1832 encapsulates the experience of tribes in the territories north of the Ohio River. But Indian removal in the Old Northwest was much more complicated—involving many Indian peoples and more than just one policy, event, or politician. In Land Too Good for Indians, historian John P. Bowes takes a long-needed closer, more expansive look at northern Indian removal—and in so doing amplifies the history of Indian removal and of the United States. Bowes focuses on four case studies that exemplify particular elements of removal in the Old Northwest. He traces the paths taken by Delaware Indians in response to Euro-American expansion and U.S. policies in the decades prior to the Indian Removal Act. He also considers the removal experience among the Seneca-Cayugas, Wyandots, and other Indian communities in the Sandusky River region of northwestern Ohio. Bowes uses the 1833 Treaty of Chicago as a lens through which to examine the forces that drove the divergent removals of various Potawatomi communities from northern Illinois and Indiana. And in exploring the experiences of the Odawas and Ojibwes in Michigan Territory, he analyzes the historical context and choices that enabled some Indian communities to avoid relocation west of the Mississippi River. In expanding the context of removal to include the Old Northwest, and adding a portrait of Native communities there before, during, and after removal, Bowes paints a more accurate—and complicated—picture of American Indian history in the nineteenth century. Land Too Good for Indians reveals the deeper complexities of this crucial time in American history. 8 black-and-white Illustrations, 2 maps, 328 pages, 6.125" x 9.125". John P. Bowes is Associate Professor of History at Eastern Kentucky University and author of several books on Indian removal, including Exiles and Pioneers: Eastern Indians in the Trans-Mississippi West. 
Price: 28.69 USD
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52 BRAGDON, KATHLEEN J. Native People Of Southern New England, 1500-1650.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2009. 0806131268 / 9780806131269 Volume 221 in the Civilization of the American Indian Series. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
In this comprehensive study of American Indians of southern New England from 1500 to 1650, Kathleen J. Bragdon discusses common features and significant differences among the Pawtucket, Massachusett, Nipmuck, Pocumtuck, Narragansett, Pokanoket, Niantic, Mohegan, and Pequot Indians. Her complex portrait, which employs both the perspective of European observers and important new evidence from archaeology and linguistics, shows that internally developed customs and values were primary determinants in the development of Native culture."A major contribution."--Neal E. Salisbury, Professor of History, Smith College, and author of Manitou and Providence "Bragdon's book will be the source for many years to come."--William Simmons, Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley "A must-read' for all of us in New England Indian studies."--Laurie Weinstein, Ethnohistory "This well-researched book, based upon Bragdon's expertise in Native American languages . . . is the best modern account of these Indians' cosmology, shamanism and rituals, kinship, social and gender relations, and political organization." -- Laurence M. Hauptman, Agricultural History 
Price: 20.85 USD
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53 BRAGDON, KATHLEEN J. Native People Of Southern New England, 1500-1650.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2009. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
In this first comprehensive study of American Indians of southern New England from 1500 to 1650, Kathleen J. Bragdon discusses common features and significant differences among the Pawtucket, Massachusett, Nipmuck, Pocumtuck, Narragansett, Pokanoket, Niantic, Mohegan, and Pequot Indians. Her complex portrait, which employs both the perspective of European observers and important new evidence from archaeology and linguistics, shows that internally developed customs and values were primary determinants in the development of Native culture. "A major contribution."--Neal E. Salisbury, Professor of History, Smith College, and author of Manitou and Providence "Bragdon's book will be the source for many years to come."--William Simmons, Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley "A must-read' for all of us in New England Indian studies."--Laurie Weinstein, Ethnohistory "This well-researched book, based upon Bragdon's expertise in Native American languages . . . is the best modern account of these Indians' cosmology, shamanism and rituals, kinship, social and gender relations, and political organization."--Laurence M. Hauptman, Agricultural History 
Price: 23.70 USD
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54 BRAGDON, KATHLEEN J. Native People Of Southern New England, 1650-1775.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2009. Volume 259 in the Civilization of the American Indian Series. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Explores Indian life in colonial southern New England. Despite the popular assumption that Native American cultures in New England declined after Europeans arrived, evidence suggests that Indian communities continued to thrive alongside English colonists. In this sequel to her Native People of Southern New England, 1500-1650, Kathleen J. Bragdon continues the Indian story through the end of the colonial era and documents the impact of colonization. As she traces changes in Native social, cultural, and economic life, Bragdon explores what it meant to be Indian in colonial southern New England. Contrary to common belief, Bragdon argues, Indianness meant continuing Native lives and lifestyles, however distinct from those of the newcomers. She recreates Indian cosmology, moral values, community organization, and material culture to demonstrate that networks based on kinship, marriage, traditional residence patterns, and work all fostered a culture resistant to assimilation. Bragdon draws on the writings and reported speech of Indians to counter what colonists claimed to be signs of assimilation. She shows that when Indians adopted English cultural forms—such as Christianity and writing—they did so on their own terms, using these alternative tools for expressing their own ideas about power and the spirit world. Despite warfare, disease epidemics, and colonists' attempts at cultural suppression, distinctive Indian cultures persisted. Bragdon's scholarship gives us new insight into both the history of the tribes of southern New England and the nature of cultural contact. Kathleen J. Bragdon is Professor of Anthropology at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, and the author of Native People of Southern New England, 1500-1650, winner of the Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin Prize of the American Society for Ethnohistory. 
Price: 31.54 USD
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55 BRANDON, WILLIAM (EDITOR). The Magic World: American Indian Songs And Poems.
William Morrow and Company, Inc. New York: 1971. 0688060056 / 9780688060053 s Softcover. Good reading copy. Library discard. 

Price: 4.04 USD
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56 BRAUN, SEBASTIAN FELIX. Buffalo Inc.: American Indians And Economic Development.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2008. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Buffalo as a business on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation. Some American Indian tribes on the Great Plains have turned to bison ranching in recent years as a culturally and ecologically sustainable economic development program. This book focuses on one enterprise on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation to determine whether such projects have fulfilled expectations and how they fit with traditional and contemporary Lakota values. Drawing upon on-site fieldwork and using anthropological, economic, and ecological approaches, Sebastian Felix Braun examines the creation of Pte Hca Ka, Inc., and its management styles as they evolved over fifteen years. He paints a compelling picture of cultural change. Braun traces Pte Hca Ka from its origin as a self-sustaining project that sought to combine traditional values with modern technology. He shows how the company tried to operate on cultural and ecological ideals until the tribal government shed its cultural agenda in favor of a pure business orientation. Braun describes these changes and presents the arguments of both sides. In Buffalo Inc., bison serve as a test case for a broader analysis of issues such as sustainability, economic development, tribal politics, and cultural identity. Sebastian Felix Braun holds a Ph.D. in anthropology from Indiana University and is Assistant Professor in the Department of Indian Studies at the University of North Dakota, Grand Forks. "Explores issues of sustainability, economic development, sovereignty, ecology, health, representation of history, and the intersection of all of these complex concepts: place." - SciTech Book News 
Price: 25.60 USD
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57 BRAUN, SEBASTIAN FELIX. Buffalo Inc.: American Indians And Economic Development.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2013. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Buffalo as a business on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation Some American Indian tribes on the Great Plains have turned to bison ranching in recent years as a culturally and ecologically sustainable economic development program. This book focuses on one enterprise on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation to determine whether such projects have fulfilled expectations and how they fit with traditional and contemporary Lakota values. Drawing upon on-site fieldwork and using anthropological, economic, and ecological approaches, Sebastian Felix Braun examines the creation of Pte Hca Ka, Inc., and its management styles as they evolved over fifteen years. He paints a compelling picture of cultural change. Braun traces Pte Hca Ka from its origin as a self-sustaining project that sought to combine traditional values with modern technology. He shows how the company tried to operate on cultural and ecological ideals until the tribal government shed its cultural agenda in favor of a pure business orientation. Braun describes these changes and presents the arguments of both sides. In Buffalo Inc., bison serve as a test case for a broader analysis of issues such as sustainability, economic development, tribal politics, and cultural identity. Sebastian Felix Braun holds a Ph.D. in anthropology from Indiana University and is Assistant Professor in the Department of Indian Studies at the University of North Dakota, Grand Forks. "Explores issues of sustainability, economic development, sovereignty, ecology, health, representation of history, and the intersection of all of these complex concepts: place." - SciTech Book News 
Price: 16.10 USD
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58 BRAUND, KATHRYN E. HOLLAND. Deerskins And Duffels: The Creek Indian Trade With Anglo - America, 1685-1815.
University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln and London: 2008. Second Edition. Indians of the Southeast Series. Includes a new Introduction by the author. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Documents the trading relationship in the eighteenth century between the Creek Indians and the Anglo-American peoples who settled in what is now the southeastern United States. The Creeks were the largest Indian nation in the Southeast, and through their trade alliance with the British colonies, they became the dominant Native power in the area. The deerskin trade became the economic lifeblood of the Creeks after European contact. This book is the first to examine extensively the Creek side of this trade, especially the impact of commercial hunting on all aspects of Indian society. British trade is examined as well: the major traders and trading companies, how goods were taken to the Indians, how the traders lived, and how trade was used as a diplomatic tool. The author also discusses the Creek-Anglo cooperation in the trade of Indian slaves that resulted in the virtual destruction of the Native peoples of Florida. Kathryn E. Holland Braund is a professor of history at Auburn University. She is the coauthor of William Bartram on the Southeastern Indians, available in a Bison Books edition. "Will stand as a prominent landmark in the study of southeastern Indians during the colonial era. This book captures the importance and complexity of Creek trade with Anglo-America, shedding new light on the operation of the deerskin market and on its impact upon Indian society."—William and Mary Quarterly "An important contribution to our understanding of the influence of the deerskin trade on Creek and Anglo-American relations in the eighteenth-century Southeast."—Journal of Southern History "This well-written book is essential for understanding the mechanics and impact of European trade on the Creek and all Southeastern Indians." — Ethnohistory "Enlightening and insightful. . . . [Braund's work] raises questions and addresses issues of fundamental importance in our quest to understand the development of the American nation in the eighteenth century."—Southern Historian "A solid contribution to the history of the southern frontier. It will be the standard by which future scholarship on the topic is measured." — Georgia Historical Quarterly 
Price: 18.72 USD
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59 BRAY, KINGSLEY. Crazy Horse: A Lakota Life.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2006. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Crazy Horse was as much feared by tribal foes as he was honored by allies. His war record was unmatched by any of his peers, and his rout of Custer at the Little Bighorn reverberates through history. Yet so much about him is unknown or steeped in legend. Crazy Horse: A Lakota Life corrects older, idealized accounts—and draws on a greater variety of sources than other recent biographies—to expose the real Crazy Horse: not the brash Sioux warrior we have come to expect but a modest, reflective man whose courage was anchored in Lakota piety. Kingsley M. Bray has plumbed interviews of Crazy Horse's contemporaries and consulted modern Lakotas to fill in vital details of Crazy Horse's inner and public life. Bray places Crazy Horse within the rich context of the nineteenth-century Lakota world. He reassesses the war chief's achievements in numerous battles and retraces the tragic sequence of misunderstandings, betrayals, and misjudgments that led to his death. Bray also explores the private tragedies that marred Crazy Horse's childhood and the network of relationships that shaped his adult life. To this day, Crazy Horse remains a compelling symbol of resistance for modern Lakotas. Crazy Horse: A Lakota Life is a singular achievement, scholarly and authoritative, offering a complete portrait of the man and a fuller understanding of his place in American Indian and United States history. Kingsley M. Bray is Senior Bookseller at BMA Hammicks Medical Bookshop in Manchester, England. He has spent the past twenty years researching Plains Indian, especially Lakota, history and ethnology. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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60 BRIGHT, WILLIAM. Native American Placenames Of The Southwest: A Handbook For Travelers.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Have you ever driven through a small town with an intriguing name like Wyandotte or Cuyamungue and wondered where that name came from? Or how such well-known placenames as Tucson, Waco, or Tulsa originated? Native American placenames like these occur all across the American Southwest. This user-friendly guide—covering Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas—provides fascinating information about the meaning and origins of southwestern placenames. With its unique regional approach and compact design, the handbook is especially suitable for curious travelers. Written by distinguished linguist William Bright, the handbook is organized alphabetically, and its entries for places—including towns, cities, counties, parks, and geographic landmarks—are concise and easy to read. Entries give the state and county, along with all available information on pronunciation, the name of the language from which the name derives, the name's literal meaning, and relevant history. In their introduction to the handbook, editors Alice Anderton and Sean O'Neill provide easy-to-understand pronunciation keys for English and Native languages. They further explain basic linguistic terminology and common southwestern geographical terms such as mesa, canyon, and barranca. The book also features maps showing all counties in each of the southwestern states, a list of Native languages and language families, and contact information for tribal headquarters throughout the Southwest. 
Price: 18.95 USD
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