Ad Infinitum Books

Quick Search

Title
Author
Description
Keyword
Advanced Search
 
 
 
 

WYOMING.

WYOMING.

Click on Title to view full description

 
1 Wyoming's Big Horn Basin To 1901: A Late Frontier.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 1997. Volume 18 in Western Lands and Waters. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Custer's defeat at the Battle of the Little Big Horn did its part to win fame for the Big Horn Basin, and much has been written about the famous characters of Wyoming. But until now the region which is Wyoming's last frontier has not received comprehensive treatment. This new study examines the Big Horn Basin during its frontier period. Isolated by Indian lands and impassable natural barriers, the Big Horn Basin remained a frontier for years after the frontier faded from other Western regions. The Indian Treaties of 1868 had left the Basin effectively encircled by Crow, Sioux, and Shoshoni Indians. The Yellowstone cordillera, Big Horn River and Wind River cut off travel on the west, east and south. Secluded and remote, the Big Horn Basin attracted only the most rugged and foolhardy, giving it a history distinct in the American saga. Trail breakers, fur traders and gold seekers, the first to open the Basin to settlement, are each highlighted. The efforts of Jedediah Smith, Charles Kemble, William Gordon, Robert Campbell, William Ashley and others were the first to blaze routes into the Basin for fur trade. There is much information on military expeditions and Indian encounters led by the likes of Lt. John Mullins, Lt. Henry E. Maynadier and Capt. William F. Reynolds, and Col. Nelson A. Miles. James Bridger, Edward Shelly, and the Expedition of 1870 figure prominently. The adventures of various prospectors are included. Stock growing entrepreneurs and alliances receive prime attention in this study. The disastrous winter of 1886-1887 and the Johnson County Invasion are described at length. Cattlemen Mason and Lovell, Torrey, and a great many others are discussed in a sweeping roster of who's who. Horse and cattle thieves, robbers and outlaws are discussed, including Hank Gorman, Charles and Ed Anderson, and Albert Nard. The lawmen who brought justice to Wyoming are also heralded here: Thomas R. Adams, Ed Lloyd, and Walter W. Peay among others. The railroad through the Big Horn Basin and its impact on a once impenetrable frontier are spotlighted. The importance of the Hill Line, Toluca Line, Lower Hanover Canal Project, and Wind River Canyon Dam are all brought to light. Water appropriation, the Carey Act, and other development, immigration and settlement projects-including Mormon settlements-are all addressed by Woods. Governor William Alford Richards, W. S. Collins, and W.D. Pickett's contributions are chronicled. Lawrence M. Woods, an attorney and certified public accountant, resides in Worland, Wyoming. He is the author of several books, including British Gentlemen in the Wild West and Alex Swan and the Swan Companies. 
Price: 37.53 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
2 BERMAN, MICHAEL P. & SUTTON, WILLIAM S. (PHOTOGRAPHY); GOODYEAR III, FRANK H. & PRESTON, CHARLES R. (TEXT); FLORES, DAN (FOREWORD). Wyoming Grasslands.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2015. Volume 19 in Charles M. Russell Center Series on Art and Photography of the American West. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Naturalist John James Audubon found the Great Plains and their wildlife so riveting when he visited the region in 1834 that he broke off a letter to his wife because he was too excited to write. In the almost two hundred years since then, the Wyoming landscape, deemed the "Italy of America" by landscape painter Albert Bierstadt, has retained its glory if not its place in the imagination of the American public. This book reminds us of the remarkable bounty contained in the wild beauty and rich history of the Wyoming grasslands—even as these riches are under threat from both human and natural forces. This landscape is now captured in all its spectacular diversity in the photography of Michael P. Berman and William S. Sutton, two of the modern American West's most accomplished and well-known landscape photographers. Essays by Frank H. Goodyear, Jr., and Charles R. Preston provide a contextual framework for the images. Goodyear introduces us to the imagery of the American West and explains the place of Berman's and Sutton's work within that tradition, and Preston focuses on the natural history of the grasslands, illuminating the area's ecological diversity and changes through the seasons and over the years. In 2012 Berman and Sutton launched their massive Wyoming Grasslands Photographic Project, a partnership between The Nature Conservancy, Wyoming Chapter, and the Buffalo Bill Center of the West. Working in the tradition of late-nineteenth-century explorers and photographers of the American West, Berman and Sutton shot more than 50,000 digital photographs of Wyoming prairie, from the Red Desert of southwestern Wyoming to the Thunder Basin National Grassland of the state's northeastern corner. The best of their extraordinarily sensitive, revealing, and powerful images appear in these pages, documenting the sweep and the seasons of the Wyoming landscape. In eloquent words and pictures, including a foreword by environmental historian Dan Flores, Wyoming Grasslands offers dramatic proof of how the land that inspired the likes of Audubon and Bierstadt, while having altered over time, still holds and demands our attention. 64 color and 58 duotone illustrations, 12" x 10.5". Frank H. Goodyear, Jr., is Guest Curator at the Draper Natural History Museum, Buffalo Bill Center of the West, in Cody, Wyoming. He is the author of numerous books, including Contemporary American Realism since 1960 and Neil Welliver. Charles R. Preston is the Willis McDonald, IV, Senior Curator of Natural Science at the Draper Natural History Museum, Buffalo Bill Center of the West, in Cody, Wyoming. His publications include Golden Eagle: Sovereign of the Skies (with G. Leppart, photographer) and An Expedition Guide to the Nature of Yellowstone and the Draper Museum of Natural History. Dan Flores is retired as A. B. Hammond Professor of History at the University of Montana, Missoula. He is the author of numerous books, including Visions of the Big Sky: Painting and Photographing the Northern Rocky Mountain West and The Natural West: Environmental History in the Great Plains and Rocky Mountains. 
Price: 37.95 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
3 BONNER, ROBERT E. William F. Cody's Wyoming Empire: The Buffalo Bill Nobody Knows.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2007. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The story of Cody's efforts as a town builder and irrigation entrepreneur. Celebrated showman of the Old West, William F. "Buffalo Bill" Cody took on another role unknown to most Americans, that of the western land developer and town promoter. In this captivating study, Robert E. Bonner demonstrates that the skills Cody acquired from decades in show business failed to prepare him for the demanding arena of business and finance. Bonner examines Cody's efforts as president of the Shoshone Irrigation Company to develop the Big Horn Basin through large-scale irrigation and town development. This meticulously researched account shows us a Buffalo Bill preoccupied with making a buck and not at all shy about using his fame to do it. Cody spent huge sums, bullied partners, patronized state officials, and exercised his charm in pursuit of developing the high plains east of Yellowstone National Park. His efforts helped shape the city of Cody and the Big Horn Basin. With the famous Irma Hotel as a cornerstone, he built the first infrastructure of the Cody-Yellowstone tourist trade and connected his little Wyoming town with the wealth of the East through personal hospitality and travel. Laced with engaging anecdotes and featuring more than twenty photographs, William F. Cody's Wyoming Empire is a much needed look at an overly mythologized character. There was more to William F. Cody than the Wild West show—and we cannot construct a full picture of the man without understanding his entrepreneurial activities in Wyoming. Robert E. Bonner is Professor Emeritus of History at Carleton College, Northfield, Minnesota. His numerous articles have appeared in such journals as the Western Historical Quarterly and Montana The Magazine of Western History. 
Price: 18.95 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
4 BONNER, ROBERT E. William F. Cody's Wyoming Empire: The Buffalo Bill Nobody Knows.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2007. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
The story of Cody's efforts as a town builder and irrigation entrepreneur. Celebrated showman of the Old West, William F. "Buffalo Bill" Cody took on another role unknown to most Americans, that of the western land developer and town promoter. In this captivating study, Robert E. Bonner demonstrates that the skills Cody acquired from decades in show business failed to prepare him for the demanding arena of business and finance. Bonner examines Cody's efforts as president of the Shoshone Irrigation Company to develop the Big Horn Basin through large-scale irrigation and town development. This meticulously researched account shows us a Buffalo Bill preoccupied with making a buck and not at all shy about using his fame to do it. Cody spent huge sums, bullied partners, patronized state officials, and exercised his charm in pursuit of developing the high plains east of Yellowstone National Park. His efforts helped shape the city of Cody and the Big Horn Basin. With the famous Irma Hotel as a cornerstone, he built the first infrastructure of the Cody-Yellowstone tourist trade and connected his little Wyoming town with the wealth of the East through personal hospitality and travel. Laced with engaging anecdotes and featuring more than twenty photographs, William F. Cody's Wyoming Empire is a much needed look at an overly mythologized character. There was more to William F. Cody than the Wild West show—and we cannot construct a full picture of the man without understanding his entrepreneurial activities in Wyoming. Robert E. Bonner is Professor Emeritus of History at Carleton College, Northfield, Minnesota. His numerous articles have appeared in such journals as the Western Historical Quarterly and Montana The Magazine of Western History. 
Price: 23.70 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
5 MCCLURE, MICHAEL. Camping Wyoming.
WigRaf Publishing, Atlantic City: 1999. 1928786006 / 9781928786009 First Edition. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
This book is your complete source for locating the right camp for you in Wyoming. Whether you are camping in a luxury motor home or in a canvas tent, this book gives you detailed directions - including 87 hand-drawn maps - and information to choose the most convenient camp along your route, or an off-route camp to a more natural setting, or a decidedly remote camp with serenity and solitude at a premium. Includes an Index. 
Price: 14.68 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
6 REA, TOM. Devil's Gate: Owning The Land, Owning The Story.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2013. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Devil's Gate—the name conjures difficult passage and portends a doubtful outcome. In this eloquent and captivating narrative, Tom Rea traces the history of the Sweetwater River valley in central Wyoming—a remote place including Devil's Gate, Independence Rock, and other sites along a stretch of the Oregon Trail—to show how ownership of a place can translate into owning its story. Seemingly in the middle of nowhere, Devil's Gate is the center of a landscape that threatens to shrink any inhabitants to insignificance except for one thing: ownership of the land and the stories they choose to tell about it. The static serenity of the once heavily traveled region masks a history of conflict. Tom Sun, an early rancher, played a role here in the lynching of the only woman ever hanged in Wyoming. The lynching was dismissed as swift frontier justice in the wake of cattle theft, but Rea finds more complicated motives that involve land and water rights. The Sun name was linked with the land for generations. In the 1990s, the Mormon Church purchased part of the Sun ranch to memorialize Martin's Cove as the site of handcart pioneers who froze to death in the valley in 1856. The treeless, arid country around Devil's Gate seems too immense for ownership. But stories run with the land. People who own the land can own the stories, at least for a time. Tom Rea is the author of Bone Wars: The Excavation and Celebrity of Andrew Carnegie's Dinosaur, winner of the Western Writers of America Spur Award for contemporary nonfiction. He lives with his family in Casper, Wyoming. 
Price: 18.95 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
7 REA, TOM. Devil's Gate: Owning The Land, Owning The Story.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2006. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Devil's Gate—the name conjures difficult passage and portends a doubtful outcome. In this eloquent and captivating narrative, Tom Rea traces the history of the Sweetwater River valley in central Wyoming—a remote place including Devil's Gate, Independence Rock, and other sites along a stretch of the Oregon Trail—to show how ownership of a place can translate into owning its story. Seemingly in the middle of nowhere, Devil's Gate is the center of a landscape that threatens to shrink any inhabitants to insignificance except for one thing: ownership of the land and the stories they choose to tell about it. The static serenity of the once heavily traveled region masks a history of conflict. Tom Sun, an early rancher, played a role here in the lynching of the only woman ever hanged in Wyoming. The lynching was dismissed as swift frontier justice in the wake of cattle theft, but Rea finds more complicated motives that involve land and water rights. The Sun name was linked with the land for generations. In the 1990s, the Mormon Church purchased part of the Sun ranch to memorialize Martin's Cove as the site of handcart pioneers who froze to death in the valley in 1856. The treeless, arid country around Devil's Gate seems too immense for ownership. But stories run with the land. People who own the land can own the stories, at least for a time. Tom Rea is the author of Bone Wars: The Excavation and Celebrity of Andrew Carnegie's Dinosaur, winner of the Western Writers of America Spur Award for contemporary nonfiction. He lives with his family in Casper, Wyoming. 
Price: 25.60 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
8 ROMTVEDT, DAVID. Windmill: Essays From Four Mile Ranch
Red Crane Books, Albuquerque. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Living in the high, harsh, dry plains of Wyoming, where the struggle to survive shapes all who live there, Romtvedt uses the windmill as a metaphor, taking the reader on a search of fundamental truths in the commonplace elements of daily existence. David Romtvedt has managed the Folk Arts Program for Centrum Foundation and served as Literature consultant to Wyoming Arts Council. He teaches part-time at the University of Wyoming and plays in a cajun, zydeco dance band named the Fireants. 
Price: 14.20 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
9 SALTIEL, E. H. & BARNETT, GEORGE; HANNA, ARCHIBALD (PREFACE). History And Business Directory Of Cheyenne And Guide To The Mining Regions Of The Rocky Mountains.
Beinecke Rare book and Manuscript Library at Yale University, New Haven: . 0845731174 Limited Edition of 400 numbered copies. Facsimile of the first edition originally published in 1868. h Hardcover, no dustjacket (as issued). Brand new book. 
This is a directory of various businesses that were located in the Cheyenne mountains as well as a detailed history of each one including businesses such as liquor distributors and grocers. Being able to compile the directory himself, E. H. Saltiel was a settler of the Cheyenne Mountains and owned Cotopaxi Gold. 
Price: 38.00 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 


Questions, comments, or suggestions
Please write to adinfinitumbooks@yahoo.com
Copyright©2017. All Rights Reserved.
Powered by ChrisLands.com

 

 

cookie