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KANSAS.

KANSAS.

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1 Immaculate Conception, Grinnell, Kansas 1896-1996.
Immaculate Conception, Grinnell: 1996. h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Good condition. 
Provides a one hundred year history of this parish in Grinnell, Kansas. 
Price: 23.75 USD
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2 AVERILL, THOMAS FOX (EDITOR). What Kansas Means To Me: Twentieth-century Writers On The Sunflower State.
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: 1990. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
"To understand why people say 'Dear old Kansas!' is to understand that Kansas is no mere geographical expression, but a 'state of mind,' a religion, and a philosophy in one," writes historian Carl Becker in the classic 1910 essay that leads off this volume. Like Becker, the twelve other essayists and four poets try to map the spiritual topography of Kansas and explain why this particular patch of prairie is so dear. They share the conviction that Kansas represents something powerful, something significant, something noteworthy. The seventeen selections are put into perspective by Thomas Fox Averill's headnotes and introductory essay, which makes its own contribution to our understanding of Kansas. The essays and poems (all previously published except for the last essay) are arranged chronologically, from the earliest (1910) to the most recent (1990). "No state struggles more self-consciously with its image than Kansas," Robert Smith Bader has observed. To the reader wanting to grasp the meaning of Kansas, this insightful collection demonstrates that some of those self-conscious struggles have led to self-understanding. "This superb collection of writings by seventeen skilled observers focuses on why Kansas has engendered such loyalty among its citizens and how they feel about it. Every Kansan can enjoy and benefit from this delightful and stimulating collection, and anyone seeking a better understanding of the Kansas character, the shaping forces behind the Kansas heritage, and the thinking involved in the Kansas 'state of mind' will find this book essential and rewarding reading."--Wichita Eagle "A treasure for every Kansan. This beautiful little book represents the views of some extraordinary writers with deep feelings for Kansas."--Kansas History "A sampler of the best writing on Kansas. Each of the pieces reflects the writers' convictions that Kansas represents something powerful, something significant, something noteworthy."--Kansas! Magazine "A reflective journey into Kansas not only as place but as a state of mind. The essayists include poets, journalists, historians, and writers whose views span from 1910 to the present. In his fine introduction (which itself stands as an evocative portrait of Kansas) Tom Averill sums up: 'there is something powerful, something significant, something noteworthy about Kansas.' Capturing this 'something' are pieces by William Allen White, Karl Menninger, Zula Bennington Greene, Milton Eisenhower, Robert Day, and William Least Heat-Moon, among others. The book is richly illustrated with prints by Kansas artists, visual essays of simple power."--Topeka Capital-Journal "A must-have for Kansans in heart, mind, or spirit, if not in fact. Black-and-white illustrations throughout come from such Kansas artists as John Steuart Curry and Birger Sandzen."--Kansas City Star "Delightful reading."--Journal of the West THOMAS FOX AVERILL is writer-in-residence and associate professor of English at Washburn University and author of two collections of short stories, Seeing Mona Naked and Passes at the Moon 
Price: 12.30 USD
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3 BUCHANAN, REX C.; MCCAULEY, JAMES R.; CHARLTON, JOHN R. (PHOTOGRAPHY). Roadside Kansas: A Traveler's Guide To Its Geology And Landmarks.
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: . Second Edition, Revised and Updated. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Two decades after its first publication, Roadside Kansas remains the premier guide to the geology, natural resources, landmarks, and landscapes along nine of the Sunflower State's major highways. During that span, however, many aspects of the Kansas landscape changed: the growth of some towns and near disappearance of others, the expansion of highways, the development of industry. Even the rocks themselves changed in places as erosion took its relentless toll. More broadly, there have been changes in the science of geology. This new edition reflects all of these changes and thoroughly updates the previous edition in ways that reinforce its preeminent status. Covering more than 2,600 miles, Buchanan and McCauley organize their book by highway and milepost markers, so that modern-day explorers can follow the road logs easily, learning about the land as they travel through the state. Featuring more than 100 photographs, drawings, and maps, the book also provides deft descriptions of fascinating contemporary and historical features to be seen all across Kansas. Especially in an economic era that has encouraged all of us to travel closer to home, the new edition is sure to be a hit with families from Kansas and the region who decide to explore and learn more about the state and its distinctive wonders. They'll discover what Buchanan and McCauley have known for a long time: Kansas highways provide much more than passage to Colorado or some other state. They are destinations in their own right. 
Price: 18.95 USD
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4 CABLE, TOM T. & MALEY, WAYNE E. Driving Across Kansas: A Guide To I-70.
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: 2003. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
In his introduction to Dan Dancer's The Four Seasons of Kansas, bestselling author William Least Half-Moon reflects upon the Great Kansas Passage of those who race their cars westward across Interstate 70 without trying to understand the truth of the place. Tom Cable and Wayne Maley come to the rescue of those bored and blinkered speed-driven travelers with a new guide that will expand and enrich their understanding of a state whose history in Heat-Moon's words, is a "tumbling of guns, torches, hachets and knives." Guided by Cable and Maley, the historic landscapes of I-70 come back to life, recalling landmarks and legacies relating to pioneer movements and Indian dispossession, army outposts and bison hunts, cowboys and cattle trails, the struggle over slavery and women's rights, and the emergence of major wheat, beef, oil, and water industries. 
Price: 12.30 USD
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5 COMPILED AND WRITTEN BY THE FEDERAL WRITERS' PROJECT OF THE WORK PROJECTS ADMINISTRATION FOR THE STATE OF KANSAS. Kansas: A Guide To The Sunflower State.
The Viking Press, New York: 1939. American Guide Series. h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Reading copy. Library discard. Does not include map of Kansas. 
Although men and women have been writing books about Kansas for over a century, this is the State's first guide book. To residents of other States it will open new vistas. And the Kansan who wants to know more about his own State - its history, its industrial background, its vast agricultural and mineral resources, its numerous points of historical interest and scenic beauty, as well as its many recreation spots - will find that this volume is comprehensive and informative. Includes an Index. 
Price: 55.05 USD
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6 COMPILED BY VIRGINIA ADAMS, KATIE ARMITAGE ET AL. On The Hill: A Photographic History Of The University Of Kansas.
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: 2007. Third Edition, Revised.. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
This rich collection of photographs spans 125 years, two world wars, the Great Depression, the turbulent 1960s, and everything in between. 
Price: 33.20 USD
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7 DARY, DAVID. More True Tales Of Old-time Kansas.
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: 1984. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
"Rollicking, adventurous, touching" is how American West magazine described David Dary's first collection of stories, True Tales of Old-Time Kansas. This sequel, containing forty-one episodes, sagas, and legends from Kansas's vigorous, free-spirited past, shows Dary again at his entertaining best. More True Tales is filled with engaging stories of outlaws and lawmen, trailride adventures, buried treasures, natural catastrophes, the famous and the obscure. Sometimes romantic and always colorful, these stories touch on the struggles and hardships encountered by the pioneers as they attempted to adjust to life in early Kansas. The tales reflect the pioneering spirit of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in this part of the country--love of freedom and individualism, and a healthy respect for Nature. In these pages Dary brings to life the excitement and adventure of the Old West: the revenge and vengeance of Bloody Bill Anderson and Dutch Henry, the exploits of bank and train robber Bill Doolen, mayhem in the state's most violent town. Colorful hermits and trappers, traders and town builders join historical characters such as William Becknell, Father of the Santa Fe Trail--whose expedition turned a two thousand percent profit--and Lizzie Johnson Williams, the first woman to follow the Western Trail. The publisher Horace Greeley described urban life along the Santa Fe Trail: "It takes three log houses to make a city in Kansas, but they begin calling it a city as soon as they have staked out the lots." Dary recounts vividly the onslaught of cyclones, tornadoes, floods, droughts, blizzards, grasshopper hordes, and dreaded prairie fires. And he includes a section of amazing tall tales--such fish stories as harnessed catfish pulling boats along the Neosho River. A generous number of illustrations helps bring the tales to life. For Dary's many fans, this new collection provides more of what Ray A. Billington, renowned historian of the Old West, described as "authentic history, delightfully told." And, as Richard Bartlett, author of Great Surveys of the American West said of the first True Tales volume, "Where else but in the frontier West were such stories really lived?" "Dary is ever the master of narrative, and these swift-moving tales are always readable, often captivating. . . . This is a contribution to the literary heritage of the state."--Thomas Isern, coauthor of Plainsfolk DAVID DARY is head of the School of Journalism at the University of Oklahoma. He is the author of several books on the West, including Red Blood and Black Ink: Journalism in the Old West, Entrepreneurs of the Old West, Seeking Pleasure in the Old West, True Tales of Old-Time Kansas, and the classic Cowboy Culture, and is the recipient of many awards, including the Cowboy Hall of Fame Wrangler Award, the Western Writers of America's Spur Award, and the Westerners International Award. 
Price: 12.30 USD
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8 DARY, DAVID. True Tales Of Old-time Kansas.
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: 1984. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
"Authentic history, delightfully told" is the way Ray A. Billington, renowned historian of the Old West, described this collection. David Dary, award-winning chronicler of life on the frontier plains, is at his entertaining best in these thirty-nine episodes, sagas, and tales from Kansas's vigorous, free-spirited past. Many of the stories appeared in Dary's True Tales of the Old-Time Plains, but that book, out of print for several years, focused on the Great Plains in general. This new edition, revised and with additional stories and a new title, pulls together tales about people, animals and events in what is today Kansas, including the old territory of Kansas (1854-1861) that stretched from the Missouri River westward to the summit of the Rocky Mountains. Many of the tales capture the romance, excitement, and adventure of the Old West, while others have the tempo of a quiet life surrounded by the immensity of the plains and prairies. There are well-known characters: Bill Cody, the Dalton gang, the Bloody Benders, William Clarke Quantrill, Abraham Lincoln, and Frederic Remington, who once owned a Kansas sheep ranch and later was a silent partner in a Kansas City saloon before he became a well-known artist. And there are stories, too, about little-known characters such as Prairie Dog Dave Morrow, who made his living capturing live prairie dogs. Dary relates tales of lost treasure and sudden riches, of outlaws and "jayhawk" raiders, of massacres and heroics. A generous number of illustrations help bring the tales to life. "Rollicking, adventurous, touching. Whether the reader invests only a few minutes at a time or finishes the book at one sitting, he is in for a lot of fun."--American West "Fascinating tales set down succinctly and excitingly."--Kansas City Times "A fun book. Where else but in the frontier West were such stories really lived?"--Richard Bartlett, author of Great Surveys of the American West and The New Country: A Social History of the American Frontier "This book reads like a collection of short stories, but it is not fiction. Highly recommended."--Library Journal DAVID DARY is head of the School of Journalism at the University of Oklahoma. He is the author of several books on the West, including Red Blood and Black Ink: Journalism in the Old West, Entrepreneurs of the Old West, Seeking Pleasure in the Old West, More True Tales of Old-Time Kansas, and the classic Cowboy Culture, and is the recipient of many awards, including the Cowboy Hall of Fame Wrangler Award, the Western Writers of America's Spur Award, and the Westerners International Award. 
Price: 12.30 USD
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9 DEAN, VIRGIL W. John Brown To Bob Dole: Movers And Shakers In Kansas History.
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: 2006. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
From radical abolitionist John Brown to presidential candidate Bob Dole to visionary environmentalist Wes Jackson, Kansas history is bursting with fascinating stories of individuals who made a difference to the nation and whose lives revel much about our collective past. Prominent Kansas historian Virgil Dean has gathered a distinguished team of writers - Thomas Isern, Craig Miner, and others - who have created incisive portraits of 27 notable men and women, covering 150 years of Kansas and American history. Here are agitators who moved their fellow citizens to action over political, social, and economic problems: not only John Brown, but also proslavery agitator William H. Russell; Mary Elizabeth Lease, lecturer for the Farmers' Alliance and Populist Party; Gerald B. Winrod, a.k.a. the "Jayhawk Hitler," and Esther Brown, who challenged segregation in public schools. Here, too, are motivators, like women's rights activist Clarina I. H. Nichols; William Allen White, the "Sage of Emporia," and favorite sons Dwight David Eisenhower and Bob Dole. Then there are the innovators, from trailblazers like Joseph G. McCoy who changed the face of the cattle industry, and wheat king Theodore C. Henry to Wes Jackson, a pioneer in the sustainable agriculture movement, and the multitalented Gordon Parks, photographer, filmaker, and author of The Learning Tree. 
Price: 18.95 USD
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10 DEARMENT, ROBERT K.; BROWN, ROBERT MAXWELL (FOREWORD). Ballots And Bullets: The Bloody County Seat Wars Of Kansas.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2006. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
"Bleeding Kansas" has earned its name. A state already scarred from the violence wrought by the likes of John Brown and William Quantrill, Kansas witnessed further episodes of wanton bloodshed in the late nineteenth century when settlers poured into a supposedly peaceful frontier. Focusing on the tumultuous years 1885-1892, Robert K. DeArment's compelling narrative is the first to reveal the complete story of the county seat wars that raged in Kansas—controversial episodes that made national news in the late 1800s but are largely unknown today. With a story populated by some of the most notorious characters of the West—including Sam Wood, Theodosius Botkin, Bat Masterson, and Bill Tilghman—Ballots and Bullets relives the violence that only avarice can breed. Ordinary, decent citizens were drawn into bitter conflicts to advance their own communities and block the fortunes of other towns, even if it meant using hired gunmen. Gripping and historically accurate, DeArment's account reveals a shocking chapter in the history of the West. Robert K. DeArment is the author of numerous books about law and order in the American West, including Deadly Dozen: Twelve Forgotten Gunfighters of the Old West. Richard Maxwell Brown is the author of the award-winning No Duty to Retreat. 
Price: 28.45 USD
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11 ETCHESON, NICOLE. Bleeding Kansas: Contested Liberty In The Civil War Era.
University Press of Kansas: Lawrence. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Few people would have expected bloodshed in Kansas Territory. After all, it had few slaves and showed few signs that slavery would even flourish. But civil war tore this territory apart in the 1850s and 60s, and "Bleeding Kansas" became a forbidding symbol for the nationwide clash over slavery that followed. Many free-state Kansans seemed to care little about slaves, and many proslavery Kansans owned not a single slave. But the failed promise of the Kansas-Nebraska Act—when fraud in local elections subverted the settlers' right to choose whether Kansas would be a slave or free state—fanned the flames of war. Nicole Etcheson seeks to revise our understanding of this era by focusing on whites' concerns over their political liberties. The first comprehensive account of "Bleeding Kansas" in more than thirty years, her study re-examines the debate over slavery expansion to emphasize issues of popular sovereignty rather than slavery's moral or economic dimensions. The free-state movement was a coalition of settlers who favored black rights and others who wanted the territory only for whites, but all were united by the conviction that their political rights were violated by nonresident voting and by Democratic presidents' heavy-handed administration of the territories. Etcheson argues that participants on both sides of the Kansas conflict believed they fought to preserve the liberties secured by the American Revolution and that violence erupted because each side feared the loss of meaningful self-governance. Bleeding Kansas is a gripping account of events and people—rabble-rousing Jim Lane, zealot John Brown, Sheriff Sam Jones, and others—that examines the social milieu of the settlers along with the political ideas they developed. As Etcheson demonstrates, the struggle over the political liberties of whites may have heightened the turmoil but led eventually to a broadening of the definition of freedom to include blacks. Her insightful re-examination sheds new light on this era and is essential reading for anyone interested in the ideological origins of the Civil War. 
Price: 18.95 USD
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12 FITZGERALD, DANIEL C.; SNELL, JOSEPH W. (FOREWORD). Ghost Towns Of Kansas: A Traveler's Guide.
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
As soon as the Kansas Territory was opened for settlement in 1854, towns sprang up like mushrooms--first along the Missouri border, then steadily westward along trail routes, rivers, and railroad lines. Many of them barely got beyond the drawing board and hundreds of them flowered briefly and died, victims of the "boom or bust" economy of the frontier and the vagaries of weather, finance, mining, agriculture, railroad construction, and politics. Ghost Towns of Kansas is a practical guide to these forsaken settlements and a chronicle of their role in the history of Kansas. It focuses on 100 towns that have either disappeared without a trace or are only "a shadowy remnant of what they once were," telling the story of each town's settlement, politics, colorful figures and legends, and eventual abandonment or decline. The culmination of more than ten years of research, this new book is a distillation of the author's immensely popular three-volume work on the state's ghost towns, now out of print. Condensed and redesigned as a traveler's guide, it is organized by region and features ten maps and detailed instructions for finding each site. Twenty of the towns included are discussed for the first time in this volume. The book also contains more than 100 black-and-white photographs of town scenes. With this new guide in hand, travelers and armchair adventurers alike can journey back to the Kansas frontier--to places like Octagon City, where settlers signed a pledge not to consume liquor, tobacco, or "the flesh of animals" in order to purchase land at $1.25 per acre from the Vegetarian Settlement Company. Or to Sheridan, a tough, end-of-the-line railroad town where, according to the Kansas Commonwealth, "the scum of creation have congregated and assumed control of municipal and social affairs." At least thirty men were hanged and a hundred killed either in gunfights or by Indians during Sheridan's tumultuous two-year life span. Today the only remainder of Octagon City is a stream named Vegetarian Creek, and "wild and woolly" Sheridan is again a pasture. "A fascinating trip back in time to some Kansas communities most of us never heard of. Concise and easy to read, this book is as entertaining as it is educational."--Ron Welch, editor, Kansas Motorist DANIEL C. FITGERALD has spent twenty years researching Kansas ghost towns and has published four books on the topic, including Faded Dreams: More Ghost Towns of Kansas. He is the local records archivist at the Kansas State Historical Society. 
Price: 14.20 USD
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13 FRAZIER, GEORGE. The Last Wild Places Of Kansas: Journeys Into Hidden Landscapes.
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: 2016. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Since the last wild bison found refuge on the back of a nickel, the public image of natural Kansas has progressed from Great American Desert to dust bowl to flyover country that has been landscaped, fenced, and farmed. But look a little harder, George Frazier suggests, and you can find the last places where tenacious stretches of prairie, forest, and wetland cheat death and incubate the DNA of lost, wild America. Documenting three years spent roaming the state in search of these hidden treasures, The Last Wild Places of Kansas is Frazier's idiosyncratic and eye-opening travelogue of nature's secret holdouts in the Sunflower State. These are places where extirpated mammalian species are making comebacks; where flying squirrels leap between centuries-old trees lit by the unearthly green glow of foxfire; where cold springs feed ancient watercress pools; where the ice moon paints the Smoky Hill with memories of the buffalo wolf and the lonesome rattle of false indigo; where the blue lid of the sky forms a vacuum seal over treeless pastel hills, orange in winter; where bluestem rises. Some are impossible to find on maps. Most are magnificently bereft of anything beneficial to 99.9 percent of modern America. True wildernesses they may not be, but at the correct angle of light, when the wind blows pollen carrying biological memories of the glaciers, these places are a crack between the worlds, portals to the lost buffalo wilderness. En route Frazier takes us from the unexpected wilds of the Kansas City suburbs to the Cimarron National Grassland in the far southwestern corner of the state. He visits ancient springs, shares a beer with prairie dog hunters, and fails in his mission to canoe the upper Marais des Cygnes—a trip that requires permission from every landowner on the route. Along the way we encounter a host of curious characters—ranchers, farmers, Native Americans, explorers, wildlife experts, and outdoor enthusiasts—all fellow travelers in a quest to know, preserve, and share the last wild places of Kansas. Ferguson Kansas History Book Award. Hamlin Garland Prize in Popular History. George Frazier is a software developer and writer whose work has appeared in such venues as Canoe & Kayak and Wild Earth. "Frazier reveals a land where ancient pecan trees grow, where flying squirrels hide in oak-hickory forests, and where streams are renegade. Readers will come away with a better understanding of the wild places of Kansas and appreciation for them."—Kansas History "George Frazier takes you to some little known and under-appreciated natural spots in Kansas. His heartfelt affection and evocative descriptions will make you want to hit the road and experience these places for yourself."—Rex Buchanan, Director of Kansas Geological Survey 
Price: 23.70 USD
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14 FRAZIER, GEORGE. The Last Wild Places Of Kansas: Journeys Into Hidden Landscapes.
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: 2017. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Since the last wild bison found refuge on the back of a nickel, the public image of natural Kansas has progressed from Great American Desert to dust bowl to flyover country that has been landscaped, fenced, and farmed. But look a little harder, George Frazier suggests, and you can find the last places where tenacious stretches of prairie, forest, and wetland cheat death and incubate the DNA of lost, wild America. Documenting three years spent roaming the state in search of these hidden treasures, The Last Wild Places of Kansas is Frazier's idiosyncratic and eye-opening travelogue of nature's secret holdouts in the Sunflower State. These are places where extirpated mammalian species are making comebacks; where flying squirrels leap between centuries-old trees lit by the unearthly green glow of foxfire; where cold springs feed ancient watercress pools; where the ice moon paints the Smoky Hill with memories of the buffalo wolf and the lonesome rattle of false indigo; where the blue lid of the sky forms a vacuum seal over treeless pastel hills, orange in winter; where bluestem rises. Some are impossible to find on maps. Most are magnificently bereft of anything beneficial to 99.9 percent of modern America. True wildernesses they may not be, but at the correct angle of light, when the wind blows pollen carrying biological memories of the glaciers, these places are a crack between the worlds, portals to the lost buffalo wilderness. En route Frazier takes us from the unexpected wilds of the Kansas City suburbs to the Cimarron National Grassland in the far southwestern corner of the state. He visits ancient springs, shares a beer with prairie dog hunters, and fails in his mission to canoe the upper Marais des Cygnes—a trip that requires permission from every landowner on the route. Along the way we encounter a host of curious characters—ranchers, farmers, Native Americans, explorers, wildlife experts, and outdoor enthusiasts—all fellow travelers in a quest to know, preserve, and share the last wild places of Kansas. Ferguson Kansas History Book Award. Hamlin Garland Prize in Popular History. George Frazier is a software developer and writer whose work has appeared in such venues as Canoe & Kayak and Wild Earth. "Frazier reveals a land where ancient pecan trees grow, where flying squirrels hide in oak-hickory forests, and where streams are renegade. Readers will come away with a better understanding of the wild places of Kansas and appreciation for them."—Kansas History "George Frazier takes you to some little known and under-appreciated natural spots in Kansas. His heartfelt affection and evocative descriptions will make you want to hit the road and experience these places for yourself."—Rex Buchanan, Director of Kansas Geological Survey 
Price: 18.95 USD
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15 HEITZ, LISA HEFNER. Haunted Kansas: Ghost Stories And Other Eerie Tales.
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: 1997. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Who's that? Is someone there? A whisper of air brushes your cheek. Then all is still. Maybe it was just the wind. Or maybe it wasn't. . . . Maybe you've just been visited by the late Ida Day lurking in the basement of Hutchinson's public library or the widow Tarot staring forlornly from an upstairs window at Fort Scott, or the phantom Earl floating behind the scenes in Concordia's Brown Grand Theater. And maybe the horrific Albino Woman truly does haunt Topeka, turning romantic nights into nightmares. . . . maybe. Pursuing the stories behind these and other spectral manifestations, Lisa Hefner Heitz has traveled the state in search of its ghostly folklore. What she has unearthed is a fascinating blend of oral histories, contemporary eye-witness accounts, and local legends. Creepy and chilling, sometimes humorous, and always engaging, her book features tales about ghosts, poltergeists, spook lights, and a host of other restless spirits that haunt Kansas. Heitz's spine-tingling collection of stories raps and taps and moans and groans through a wealth of descriptions of infamous Kansas phantoms, as well as disconcerting personal experiences related by former skeptics. Many of these ghosts, she shows, are notoriously linked to specific structures or locations, whether it is an eighteenth-century mansion in Atchison or a deep--some have claimed bottomless--pool near Ashland. The evanescent apparitions of these tales have frightened and at times amused Kansans throughout the state's long history. Yet this is the first book to capture for posterity the lively antics of the state's ghostly denizens. Besides preserving a colorful and imaginative, if intangible, side of the state's popular heritage, Heitz supplies ghost-storytellers with ample hair-raising material for, well, eternity. Maybe that person breathing softly behind you has another such story to share. Oh, no one's there? Perhaps it really was just the breeze off the prairie. "Finally, a book not about Dorothy, the Yellow Brick Road, or being bored silly, but one that tells us what we've known all along--Kansas is a spooky place." --James J. Fisher, Kansas City Star "Heitz has carefully crafted and cleverly recounted the state's best tales, legends, and ghost stories. Whether you are a believer or not, this book will haunt your memory with the eerie, the pathetic, the tragic, and the bizarre. A delight to read and contemplate, Haunted Kansas inspires us to think differently about our state and adds a new dimension to Kansas literature."--Thomas Fox Averill, author of What Kansas Means to Me "Enjoyable and easy to read, Haunted Kansas tells us a great deal about who we are as Kansans and gives us insights into our values and attitudes. It will also appeal to anyone interested in regionalism, folklore, history, or popular culture."--Jennie Chinn, Kansas folklorist and coauthor of Kansas Quilts and Quilters LISA HEFNER HEITZ, a Topeka native and resident, is a freelance writer whose articles have appeared in Kansas!, Midwest Living, and other publications. 
Price: 14.20 USD
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16 HOAGLAND, NORMA DECKER (COMPILED BY); FOREWORD BY SARA PARETSKY; DESIGNED BY SHALA STEVENSON. Watkins And Miller Halls: University Of Kansas.
Historic Mount Oread Friends, Lawrence: 2016. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Elizabeth Miller Watkins was the greatest benefactress of the University of Kansas. Her innovative vision for a women's scholarship hall was the first of its kind in the nation. Watkins Hall, built in 1926, and its twin Miller Hall, in 1937, are striking examples of architecture influencing behavior. Elizabeth's letters show how she conceived, designed, and even decorated "her" halls for "her" girls. Read about the evolution of student life and customs of the times in these two halls, as they reach ninety and eighty years of age. The story is told in the words and photos of the women who lived in them from 1926 to the present. Norma Decker Hoagland counts herself as fortunate to have been a Watkins woman and is currently president of Kitchen 8, the alumnae organization for Watkins and Miller Halls at KU. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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17 ISE, JOHN; ROTHENBERGER, VON (EDITOR). Sod And Stubble.
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: . Unabridged and Annotated Edition.1996. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
"A few years ago, as I listened one night to my mother telling incidents of her life pioneering in the semi-arid region of Western Kansas, it occurred to me that the picture of that early time was worth drawing and preserving for the future, and that, if this were ever to be done, it must be done soon, before all of the old settlers were gone. This book is the result--an effort to picture that life truly and realistically. It is the story of an energetic and capable girl, the child of German immigrant parents, who at the age of seventeen married a young German farmer, and moved to a homestead on the wind-swept plains of Kansas, where she reared eleven of her twelve children, and remembering regretfully her own half-day in school, sent nine of them through college. It is a story of grim and tenacious devotion in the face of hardships and disappointments, devotion that never flagged until the long, hard task of near a lifetime was done."--John Ise (from the preface) Deeply moved by his mother's memories of a waning era and rapidly disappearing lifestyle, John Ise painstakingly recorded the adventures and adversities of his family and boyhood neighbors--the early homesteaders of Osborne County, Kansas. First published in 1936, his "nonfiction novel" Sod and Stubble has since become a widely read and much loved classic. In the original, Ise changed some identities and time sequences but accurately retained the uplifting and disheartening realities of prairie life. Von Rothenberger brings us a new annotated and expanded edition that greatly enhances Ise's timeless tale. He includes the entire first edition-replete with Ise's charm, wit, and veracity, restores four of Ise's original chapters that have never been published, and adds photographs of many of the key characters. In his notes, Rothenberger reveals the true identity of Ise's family and neighbors, provides background on their lives, and places events within a wider historical and geographical context. Ushering us through a dynamic period of pioneering history, from the 1870s to the turn of the century, Sod and Stubble abounds with the events and issues--fires and droughts, parties and picnics, insect infestations and bumper crops, prosperity and poverty, divisiveness and generosity, births and deaths--that shaped the lives and destinies of Henry and Rosa Ise, their family, and their community. One hundred and twenty-five years after Osborne County was organized and Henry Ise homesteaded his claim, a corner of nineteenth-century Kansas social history remains safeguarded thanks to the tenacity of John Ise and the insight of Von Rotheberger, who enlivens Ise's story with revealing detail. "Over the years, I have recommended this book to hundreds of people in all walks of life and of almost all ages. Many have declared it to be the most informative and most interesting book they have read about Kansas history. The new material Rothenberger has located will add substantially to its value."--Leo E. Oliva, author of Woodston: The Story of a Kansas Country Town "A first-rate edition. The annotations are informative in content and graceful in style."--Susan J. Rosowski, general editor of The Willa Cather Scholarly Edition JOHN ISE, editor of Sod-House Days: Letters from a Kansas Homesteader, 1877-78, was professor of economics at the University of Kansas from 1916 to 1955. VON ROTHENBERGER, a freelance writer, is himself a native of Osborne County, a community he has researched extensively for many years. 
Price: 15.15 USD
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18 ISE, JOHN; ROTHENBERGER, VON (EDITOR). Sod And Stubble.
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: . Unabridged and Annotated Edition.1996. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
"A few years ago, as I listened one night to my mother telling incidents of her life pioneering in the semi-arid region of Western Kansas, it occurred to me that the picture of that early time was worth drawing and preserving for the future, and that, if this were ever to be done, it must be done soon, before all of the old settlers were gone. This book is the result--an effort to picture that life truly and realistically. It is the story of an energetic and capable girl, the child of German immigrant parents, who at the age of seventeen married a young German farmer, and moved to a homestead on the wind-swept plains of Kansas, where she reared eleven of her twelve children, and remembering regretfully her own half-day in school, sent nine of them through college. It is a story of grim and tenacious devotion in the face of hardships and disappointments, devotion that never flagged until the long, hard task of near a lifetime was done."--John Ise (from the preface) Deeply moved by his mother's memories of a waning era and rapidly disappearing lifestyle, John Ise painstakingly recorded the adventures and adversities of his family and boyhood neighbors--the early homesteaders of Osborne County, Kansas. First published in 1936, his "nonfiction novel" Sod and Stubble has since become a widely read and much loved classic. In the original, Ise changed some identities and time sequences but accurately retained the uplifting and disheartening realities of prairie life. Von Rothenberger brings us a new annotated and expanded edition that greatly enhances Ise's timeless tale. He includes the entire first edition-replete with Ise's charm, wit, and veracity, restores four of Ise's original chapters that have never been published, and adds photographs of many of the key characters. In his notes, Rothenberger reveals the true identity of Ise's family and neighbors, provides background on their lives, and places events within a wider historical and geographical context. Ushering us through a dynamic period of pioneering history, from the 1870s to the turn of the century, Sod and Stubble abounds with the events and issues--fires and droughts, parties and picnics, insect infestations and bumper crops, prosperity and poverty, divisiveness and generosity, births and deaths--that shaped the lives and destinies of Henry and Rosa Ise, their family, and their community. One hundred and twenty-five years after Osborne County was organized and Henry Ise homesteaded his claim, a corner of nineteenth-century Kansas social history remains safeguarded thanks to the tenacity of John Ise and the insight of Von Rotheberger, who enlivens Ise's story with revealing detail. "Over the years, I have recommended this book to hundreds of people in all walks of life and of almost all ages. Many have declared it to be the most informative and most interesting book they have read about Kansas history. The new material Rothenberger has located will add substantially to its value."--Leo E. Oliva, author of Woodston: The Story of a Kansas Country Town "A first-rate edition. The annotations are informative in content and graceful in style."--Susan J. Rosowski, general editor of The Willa Cather Scholarly Edition JOHN ISE, editor of Sod-House Days: Letters from a Kansas Homesteader, 1877-78, was professor of economics at the University of Kansas from 1916 to 1955. VON ROTHENBERGER, a freelance writer, is himself a native of Osborne County, a community he has researched extensively for many years. 
Price: 33.25 USD
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19 JOST, LORA & LOEWENSTEIN, DAVE; HARDY, SARALYN REECE (FOREWORD). Kansas Murals: A Traveler's Guide.
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: . h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Travelers in Kansas in search of fine art needn't restrict themselves to the state's many excellent museums. 
Price: 33.25 USD
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20 LEE, R. ALTON. Farmers Vs. Wage Earners: Organized Labor In Kansas, 1860--1960.
University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln and London: 2008. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
While predominantly agrarian, Kansas has a surprisingly rich heritage of labor history and played an active role in the major labor strife of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Farmers vs. Wage Earners is a survey of the organized labor movement in the Sunflower State, which reflected in a microcosm the evolution of attitudes toward labor in the United States. R. Alton Lee emphasizes the social and political developments of labor in Kansas and what it was like to work in the mines, the oil fields, and the factories that created the modern industrial world. He vividly describes the stories of working people: how they and their families lived and worked, their dreams and aspirations, their reasons for joining a union and how it served their interests, how they fought to achieve their goals through the political process, and how employment changed over the decades in terms of race, gender, and working conditions. The general public supported labor after the Civil War, but increasing urbanization and the farmer-dominated legislatures helped quell this sympathy, and new ire was eventually directed at the workingman. By examining the progress of industrial labor in an agrarian state, Lee shows how Kansans, like many Americans, could eagerly accept the federal largesse of the New Deal but at the same time bitterly denounce its philosophy and goals in the wake of the Great Depression. R. Alton Lee is a professor emeritus of history at the University of South Dakota. He is the author of The Bizarre Careers of John R. Brinkley and T-Town on the Plains. "Lee provides a compelling narrative of Kansas labor. Building on the accounts of other writers, Professor Lee further illuminates the story of the state's wage earners. He skillfully weaves Kansas politics into the fabric of the labor movement and puts this in a national context. Professor Lee has written a synthesis that captures the rich heritage of Kansas labor history."—Ralph Scharnau, Kansas History "[Readers] will find Lee's grand narrative of Kansas's industrial development and labor's reaction and reform exceedingly valuable."—Jeffrey A. Johnson, South Dakota History "Lee covers a wide range of issues and incidents of significance to Kansas workers and to the politicians and labor leaders who took up their cause, from the railroad strikes and problems of the 1870s and 1880s to the struggle over 'right to work' in the late 1950s."—Nebraska History "It is with regard to the economic, social, and political changes in Kansas as the twentieth century wore on that the book is most astute as a regional study of national trends. Lee expertly weaves the history of the Great Depression and New Deal reforms in terms of significant effects on working-class life and on changing governmental policies in Kansas. . . . Probably the most important chapter in Lee's study is "Farmer against Laborer," in which the author deals with a major problem in twentieth-century labor history that carries over into the current century: the failure of the movement to build upon or even advance its role in the American economy after the immediate postwar period. Although this is a national issue, Lee explains how it has played out in a largely agrarian state with a voting constituency that truly did not understand or perhaps even care to understand the necessity of economic democracy in the workplace." —Greg Hall, American Historical Review "Historians of the sunflower state have long valorized the agricultural roots of Kansas while largely overlooking the contributions of working men and women to the region's history. In this thorough and well-researched study, Lee attempts to redress this gap in historical knowledge and trade the development of the political, cultural, and economic boundaries that came to divide farmers from wage earners. The volume admirably documents the development of this antagonistic relationship while also providing a detailed outline of labor history in Kansas. . . . Lee successfully explores workers' struggles in the railroad industry, mining, itinerant farm labor, aeronautics, defense, oil, and meatpacking."—Margaret C. Wood, Great Plains Quarterly "R. Alton Lee presents a well-researched narrative of organized labor, labor regulation, and the story of industrial work and workers in Kansas since the Civil War."—Bill Mullins, Chronicles of Oklahoma 
Price: 23.70 USD
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