Ad Infinitum Books

Quick Search

Title
Author
Description
Keyword
Advanced Search
 
 
 
 

MISSISSIPPI.

MISSISSIPPI.

Click on Title to view full description

 
1 BARNWELL, MARY (EDITOR). A Place Called Mississippi: Collected Narratives.
University Press of Mississippi, Jackson: . h Hardcover, no dustjacket (as issued). Brand new book. 
An anthology of readings that reveal the mind and the character of the Magnolia State Filled with serendipitous connections and contrasts, this volume of Mississippiana covers four hundred years. It begins with a selection from "A Gentleman from Elvas," written in 1541, and ends with an essay the novelist Ellen Douglas wrote in 1996 on the occasion of the Atlanta Olympic games. In between is a chronology of some one hundred nonfictional narratives that portray the distinctiveness of life in Mississippi. Most are reprinted, but some are published here for the first time. Each section of this anthology reveals an aspect of Mississippi's past or present. Here are narratives that depict the settlement of the land by pioneers, the lasting heritage of the Civil War, the pleasures and the pastimes of Mississippians, their food, art, rituals, and religion, the terrain and the travelers, and the conflicts that brought enormous changes to both the landscape and the population. In its wide cultural perspective A Place Called Mississippi includes an early description of the Chickasaws, a narrative of a former slave, "Soggy" Sweat's famous "Whiskey Speech" on Prohibition, and an account of how W. C. Handy discovered the blues in a deserted train station in Tutwiler, Mississippi. Among the selections are narratives by Jefferson Davis, Belle Kearney, Walter Anderson, Ida B. Wells, Richard Wright, Craig Clai-borne, Richard Ford, William Faulkner, and Eudora Welty. Written by and about blacks, whites, Native Americans, and others, these fascinating accounts convey a variety of impressions about a real place and about real people whose colorful history is large, ever-changing, and ever-mystifying. Marion Barnwell is a professor of English at Delta State University. 
Price: 58.90 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
2 BARNWELL, MARY (EDITOR). A Place Called Mississippi: Collected Narratives.
University Press of Mississippi, Jackson: . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
An anthology of readings that reveal the mind and the character of the Magnolia State Filled with serendipitous connections and contrasts, this volume of Mississippiana covers four hundred years. It begins with a selection from "A Gentleman from Elvas," written in 1541, and ends with an essay the novelist Ellen Douglas wrote in 1996 on the occasion of the Atlanta Olympic games. In between is a chronology of some one hundred nonfictional narratives that portray the distinctiveness of life in Mississippi. Most are reprinted, but some are published here for the first time. Each section of this anthology reveals an aspect of Mississippi's past or present. Here are narratives that depict the settlement of the land by pioneers, the lasting heritage of the Civil War, the pleasures and the pastimes of Mississippians, their food, art, rituals, and religion, the terrain and the travelers, and the conflicts that brought enormous changes to both the landscape and the population. In its wide cultural perspective A Place Called Mississippi includes an early description of the Chickasaws, a narrative of a former slave, "Soggy" Sweat's famous "Whiskey Speech" on Prohibition, and an account of how W. C. Handy discovered the blues in a deserted train station in Tutwiler, Mississippi. Among the selections are narratives by Jefferson Davis, Belle Kearney, Walter Anderson, Ida B. Wells, Richard Wright, Craig Clai-borne, Richard Ford, William Faulkner, and Eudora Welty. Written by and about blacks, whites, Native Americans, and others, these fascinating accounts convey a variety of impressions about a real place and about real people whose colorful history is large, ever-changing, and ever-mystifying. Marion Barnwell is a professor of English at Delta State University. 
Price: 23.75 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
3 BOLTON, CHARLES C. William F. Winter And The New Mississippi: A Biography.
University Press of Mississippi, Jackson: 2013. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
The life story of the governor known for his fight for education and racial reconciliation. For more than six decades, William F. Winter (b. 1923) has been one of the most recognizable public figures in Mississippi. His political career spanned the 1940s through the early 1980s, from his initial foray into Mississippi politics as James Eastland's driver during his 1942 campaign for the United States Senate, as state legislator, as state tax collector, as state treasurer, and as lieutenant governor. Winter served as governor of the state of Mississippi from 1980 to 1984. A voice of reason and compromise during the tumultuous civil rights battles, Winter represented the earliest embodiment of the white moderate politicians who emerged throughout the "New South." His leadership played a pivotal role in ushering in the New Mississippi: a society that moved beyond the racial caste system that had defined life in the state for almost a century after emancipation. In many ways, Winter's story over nine decades is also the story of the evolution of Mississippi in the second half of the twentieth century. Winter has remained active in public life since retiring from politics following an unsuccessful U.S. Senate campaign against Thad Cochran in 1984. During the last twenty-five years, Winter has worked with a variety of organizations to champion issues that have always been central to his vision of how to advance the interests of his native state and the South as a whole. Improving the economy, upgrading the educational system, and facilitating racial reconciliation are goals he has pursued with passion. The first biography of this pivotal figure, William F. Winter and the New Mississippi traces his life and influences from boyhood days in Grenada County, through his service in World War II, and through his long career serving Mississippi. Charles C. Bolton, Greensboro, North Carolina, is professor and head of history at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He is the author of The Hardest Deal of All: The Battle over School Integration in Mississippi, 1870-1980 (University Press of Mississippi) and coeditor of With All Deliberate Speed: Implementing Brown v. Board of Education. 30 b&w photographs (approx.), index . 
Price: 33.25 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
4 BURDINE, JANE RULE (PHOTOGRAPHS); MCDARIS, WENDY (EDITOR); YARBROUGH, STEVE (INTRODUCTION). Delta Deep Down.
University Press of Mississippi, Jackson: 2008. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
The Mississippi Delta evokes mystery, beauty, and hardship in equal measures. Its haunted fields, turbulent history, and resilient people have fueled countless songs, tales, and literary works. Its presence resonates strongly in the construction of the American South. In Delta Deep Down, photographer Jane Rule Burdine captures the region with clarity and warmth. "The image that Jane Rule's book both begins and ends on is haunting precisely because it captures the past that's always lurking within the Delta's present. There is something surreal, almost Kafkaesque on display here. A farmer with his back to us drives a tractor straight ahead on a lonely dirt road. Big woods loom on the left. On the right, at the edge of a field of cotton, a grey-clad horseman moves in the opposite direction, a ghost returning to history." - Steve Yarbrough, from the Introduction. Since the early 1970s, Burdine has used the Delta as her muse, traversing and documenting the ever-changing landscape in color photographs. These powerful images reflect how the Delta and its citizens have responded to each other, and how each has in turn been changed. Weatherbeaten shacks, cotton and soybean fields, industrial equipment, people at work and play, and cloud-draped, endless horizons are all seen through Burdine's lens. The Delta's past and present mingle in every photograph of the inhabitants - black and white, young and old, rich and poor - in moments of contemplation, hard work, and joyous revelry. Novelist and Indianola native Steve Yarbrough offers a touching, personal introduction that explores how Burdine's photographs reveal the place he once called home, and how, through her photographs, the hold this fertile ground claims on his heart is reinforced. Delta Deep Down offers an unforgettable portrait of a quintessential Mississippi place and the people who abide in it. Wendy McDaris provides historical context and locates Burdine's work among current trends in fine art photography. Jane Rule Burdine is a photographer based in Taylor, Mississippi. Wendy McDaris is a curator/cultural critic living in upstate New York and editor/essayist for Visualizing the Blues: Photographs of the American South, among other art catalogs. Steve Yarbrough is the James and Coke Hallowell Professor of Creative Writing at California State University, Fresno, and the author of The Oxygen Man, Visible Spirits, The End of California, and other novels. There are 96 color photographs. 
Price: 28.50 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
5 COOPER, FORREST LAMAR. Looking Back Mississippi: Towns And Places.
University Press of Mississippi, Jackson: . h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Postcards and prose that recapture outstanding locales and events from bygone days. For the past three decades, historian and archivist Forrest Lamar Cooper has written a regular column for Mississippi Magazine about unusual, fascinating aspects of the state's history, culture, products, and people. Whether describing the Jubilee Beverage Company of Jackson, the origins of the Mississippi State Fair, a Mississippi veteran who fought at Iwo Jima, or Biloxi's Riviera Hotel, Cooper's "Looking Back" columns are thoroughly researched and written with verve and clarity. Looking Back Mississippi: Towns and Places collects thirty-nine of Cooper's best essays on the various cities, towns, dwellings, parks, and institutions of historical resonance. Covering all corners of the state, from the mid-1800s to the 1930s, the volume offers an engaging, convivial alternative history of Mississippi, one that emphasizes the obscure and small-scale over the big picture. Each short essay is accompanied by photographic and illustrative postcards from Cooper's private collection. These postcards and other memorabilia give delightful visual clarity to Cooper's historical accounts of towns as far north as Hernando and as coastal as Pass Christian, from the Delta to the Pine Belt. Cooper focuses on Mississippi places, and the people and events that made them famous. Much of the architecture and even the terrain--as with the Gulf Coast's once-legendary orange groves--has disappeared, making Cooper's postcards invaluable resources for understanding and visualizing what no longer exists. Looking Back Mississippi provides a treasure trove of history and insight into long-vanished corners of the state. Forrest Lamar Cooper, Florence, Mississippi, has served as a senior customer representative with Delta Air Lines and as an information officer for the USDA Forest Service. He writes on Mississippi history and culture for Mississippi Magazine and other periodicals. Cooper is the author of In Hometown Mississippi, published by University Press of Mississippi. 224 pages (approx.), 8 1/2 x 11 inches, 124 color photographs. 
Price: 38.00 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
6 GOLDNG, MELODY; BURDINE, HANK (INTRODUCTION); WITH RECIPES FROM CHEF JOHN FOLSE. Panther Tract: Wild Boar Hunting In The Mississippi Delta.
University Press of Mississippi, Jackson: . h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Photographs and tales that magnify the tradition-rich lore of dogs, horses, and hunters pursuing wild boar Hunting wild boar is a keenly held tradition in the Mississippi Delta. Fraught with danger, it challenges the hunter, observer, wildlife enthusiast, and landowner alike. Panther Tract is an insider's observance of extraordinary hunting, southern hospitality, camaraderie, and the love of dogs, horses, and hair-raising excitement. The 160 photographs are representative of a "day at the hunt," starting at dawn and ending well after dark. The tales center on vivid hunting experiences, both at Panther Tract, a large wilderness paradise in Yazoo County, owned by legendary southern gentleman Howard Brent, and in other locations in the Mississippi Delta. The narratives come from men, women, doctors, lawyers, judges, businessmen, politicians, farmers, sharecroppers' sons, and even a Hollywood screenwriter. Melody Golding's photographs focus on the Delta landscape and on the people and animals involved in the hunt. Portraits of the hunters, and their interactions with one another and their dogs and horses, fascinate. An award-winning photographer and an expert horsewoman, Golding brings a knowledgeable and critical eye to these images. The stories she collects range from traditional and often humorous hunting tales to more serious accounts of the history of hog hunting in America. Hank Burdine a Mississippi native and hunter who has written for many statewide publications, lends a broad vision to the history, statistics, and lore of hunting wild hogs. An appendix features hunt recipes by Chef John Folse and philosophy on the stewardship of harvesting the hog. A colorful and diverse assemblage of beautiful photographs and tales, this book reveals a treasured regional tradition. Melody Golding, Vicksburg, Mississippi, is a writer, photographer, and artist. The Smithsonian Institute's National Museum of American History Archives Center acquired her solo documentary exhibit Katrina: Mississippi Women Remember. Her photographs are on display in the Congressional Hearing Room at the Department of Homeland Security and have been featured in solo exhibitions at the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C., and at numerous colleges, universities, and museums. Learn more about her work at www.melodygolding.com. 256 pages (approx.), 9 x 9 inches, 160 color photographs, introduction, appendix. 
Price: 38.00 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
7 MCCORD, CHARLINE R. & TUCKER, JUDY H. (EDITORS). Coming Home To Mississippi.
University Press of Mississippi, Jackson: . h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Celebrations of homecoming by prominent Mississippians who made the return journey. With essays by Kevin Bullard, Wyatt Cooper, Bob Allan Dunaway, William Dunlap, Morgan Freeman, Carolyn Haines, Barry Hannah, Mary Donnelly Haskell, Sam Haskell, Alice Jackson, William Jeanes, Russell Knight, Johnnie Mae Maberry, Charline R. McCord, Jo McDivitt, Mary Ann Mobley, Willie Morris, Ronnie Riggs, Maureen Ryan, David Sheffield, Michael Farris Smith, Marco St. John, Scott Stricklin, Keith Thibodeaux, J. Dale Thorn, Judy H. Tucker, Cynthia Walker, Tricia Walker, Jerry W. Ward, Jr., Jesmyn Ward, Sela Ward, Norma Watkins, Dolphus Weary, and Curtis Wilkie In this collection, essayists examine their lives, their memories of Mississippi, the reasons they left the state, and what drew them back. They talk about how life differs and wears on you in the far-flung parts of our nation, and the qualities that make Mississippi unique. The writers from all corners of the state are as diverse as the regions from which they come. They are of different races, different life experiences, different talents, and different temperaments. Yet in acceding to the magical lure of Mississippi they are in many ways alike. Their roots are deep in the rich soil of this state, and they come from strong families that valued education and promoted an indomitable optimism. Successes stem from a passion, usually emerging early in life, that burns within them. But that passion is tempered, disciplined, encouraged, and influenced by the people around them, as well as the landscape and the history of their times. These essays give us a glimpse of the people and places that nurtured the young lives of the essayists and offered the values that directed them as they sought their dreams elsewhere. Often they found that opportunity was within their grasp in their home state and came back to realize their full potential. They came back, in some cases, to retire to a familiar place of pleasant memories, to family and to friends. They all have a love and respect for Mississippi and continue, back home, to use their talents to help make the state an even better place to live. 160 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, 32 black and white photographs, introduction Charline R. McCord, Clinton, Mississippi, and Judy H. Tucker, Jackson, Mississippi, have published numerous books together, including Christmas Stories from Mississippi, Growing Up in Mississippi, and Christmas Memories from Mississippi, all available from the University Press of Mississippi. 
Price: 23.75 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 


Questions, comments, or suggestions
Please write to adinfinitumbooks@yahoo.com
Copyright©2017. All Rights Reserved.
Powered by ChrisLands.com

 

 

cookie