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ANARCHY.

ANARCHY.

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1 BAER, JAMES A. Anarchist Immigrants In Spain And Argentina.
University of Illinois Press, Urbana and Chicago: h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
The transatlantic bonds between two entwined anarchist movements From 1868 through 1939, anarchists' migrations from Spain to Argentina and back again created a transnational ideology and influenced the movement's growth in each country. James A. Baer follows the lives, careers, and travels of Diego Abad de Santillán, Manuel Villar, and other migrating anarchists to highlight the ideological and interpersonal relationships that defined a vital era in anarchist history. Drawing on extensive interviews with Abad de Santillán, José Grunfeld, and Jacobo Maguid, along with unusual access to anarchist records and networks, Baer uncovers the ways anarchist migrants in pursuit of jobs and political goals formed a critical nucleus of militants, binding the two countries in an ideological relationship that profoundly affected the history of both. He also considers the impact of reverse migration and discusses political decisions that had a hitherto unknown influence on the course of the Spanish Civil War. Personal in perspective and transnational in scope, Anarchist Immigrants in Spain and Argentina offers an enlightening history of a movement and an era. James A. Baer is a professor of history at Northern Virginia Community College and Senior Research Fellow at the Council on Hemispheric Affairs in Washington, D.C. "Drawing on current conceptions of transnational and migration processes and networks, this study is a welcome corrective to the standard nation-centered treatments of anarchism in Spain and Argentina. Baer's detailed prosopographical analysis of a decisive nucleus of Spanish anarchist thinkers and militants whose activism extended to both sides of the Atlantic enriches and advances our understanding of the mutually constitutive character of Spanish and Argentine anarchism."--Steven J. Hirsch, Washington University in St. Louis "While there is no shortage of histories about anarchism in either Spain or Argentina, James Baer's Anarchist Immigrants in Spain and Argentina provides a fresh look at how anarchism in each country influenced the other. Baer's transnational approach illustrates how anarchists from Spain played key roles in Argentine organizations, newspapers, and ideological disputes. Some of these same anarchists from Spain, who often had lived years, if not decades, in Argentina, returned to Spain and were joined by Argentine-born anarchists who then shaped Iberian organizations and debates. This is especially clear in the case of the Spanish Civil War, where Baer skillfully recounts the war and the role of these transnational anarchists--many of whom then fled back to Argentina as the Republic was collapsing."--Kirwin Shaffer, author of Black Flag Boricuas: Anarchism, Antiauthoritarianism, and the Left in Puerto Rico, 1897-1921 
Price: 52.25 USD
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2 ZIMMER, KENYON. Immigrants Against The State: Yiddish And Italian Anarchism In America.
University of Illinois Press, Urbana and Chicago: 2015. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The worlds that anarchists left behind, the worlds in which they lived, and the worlds they strove to create From the 1880s through the 1940s, tens of thousands of first- and second-generation immigrants embraced the anarchist cause after arriving on American shores. Kenyon Zimmer explores why these migrants turned to anarchism and how their adoption of its ideology shaped their identities, experiences, and actions. Zimmer focuses on Italians and Eastern European Jews in San Francisco, New York City, and Paterson, New Jersey. Tracing the movement's changing fortunes from the pre-World War I era through the Spanish Civil War, Zimmer argues that anarchists, opposed to both American and Old World nationalism, severed all attachments to their nations of origin but also resisted assimilation into their host society. Their radical cosmopolitan outlook and identity instead embraced diversity and extended solidarity across national, ethnic, and racial divides. Though in the end unable to withstand the onslaught of Americanism and other nationalisms, the movement nonetheless provided an important example of a transnational collective identity delinked from the nation-state and racial hierarchies. Kenyon Zimmer is an assistant professor of history at the University of Texas at Arlington. "Admirably, the author uses Italian- and Yiddish-language sources to produce one of the most extensive accounts of anarchism in twentieth-century America. One of the best histories of anarchism in the United States."--Tony Michels, author of A Fire in Their Hearts: Yiddish Socialists in New York "I have been waiting for a book like this for a long time, one that tells of the multiethnic and transnational world of early twentieth-century anarchism, not just from the perspective of the notorious figures, but from the grass roots. Zimmer is both a highly gifted storyteller and a meticulous, careful researcher whose account follows this history through a truly astonishing range of sources in Yiddish, Italian, Spanish, German, and English, from archives across the globe. This is the new generation of transnational working-class history at its very best."--Jennifer Guglielmo, author of Living the Revolution: Italian Women's Resistance and Radicalism in New York City, 1880-1945 "A century ago, anarchists were everywhere, a movement in constant movement. Having mastered the languages of the two largest groups of immigrant anarchists in the United States, Kenyon Zimmer paints intimate portraits of their Yiddish- and Italian-speaking worlds. The book will be required reading for all scholars of immigrant radicalism. More broadly, anyone interested in the complex intersections of class, mobility, and culture in our own times will find much to ponder in the cosmopolitanism and internationalism immigrants created as they responded to the violent nationalist politics of their own times."--Donna R. Gabaccia, author of Immigration and American Diversity: A Social and Cultural History Publication of this book was supported by a grant from the University of Texas at Arlington. 
Price: 28.50 USD
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3 ZIMMER, KENYON. Immigrants Against The State: Yiddish And Italian Anarchism In America.
University of Illinois Press, Urbana and Chicago: 2015. h Hardcover as issued without dustjacket. Brand new book. 
The worlds that anarchists left behind, the worlds in which they lived, and the worlds they strove to create From the 1880s through the 1940s, tens of thousands of first- and second-generation immigrants embraced the anarchist cause after arriving on American shores. Kenyon Zimmer explores why these migrants turned to anarchism and how their adoption of its ideology shaped their identities, experiences, and actions. Zimmer focuses on Italians and Eastern European Jews in San Francisco, New York City, and Paterson, New Jersey. Tracing the movement's changing fortunes from the pre-World War I era through the Spanish Civil War, Zimmer argues that anarchists, opposed to both American and Old World nationalism, severed all attachments to their nations of origin but also resisted assimilation into their host society. Their radical cosmopolitan outlook and identity instead embraced diversity and extended solidarity across national, ethnic, and racial divides. Though in the end unable to withstand the onslaught of Americanism and other nationalisms, the movement nonetheless provided an important example of a transnational collective identity delinked from the nation-state and racial hierarchies. Kenyon Zimmer is an assistant professor of history at the University of Texas at Arlington. "Admirably, the author uses Italian- and Yiddish-language sources to produce one of the most extensive accounts of anarchism in twentieth-century America. One of the best histories of anarchism in the United States."--Tony Michels, author of A Fire in Their Hearts: Yiddish Socialists in New York "I have been waiting for a book like this for a long time, one that tells of the multiethnic and transnational world of early twentieth-century anarchism, not just from the perspective of the notorious figures, but from the grass roots. Zimmer is both a highly gifted storyteller and a meticulous, careful researcher whose account follows this history through a truly astonishing range of sources in Yiddish, Italian, Spanish, German, and English, from archives across the globe. This is the new generation of transnational working-class history at its very best."--Jennifer Guglielmo, author of Living the Revolution: Italian Women's Resistance and Radicalism in New York City, 1880-1945 "A century ago, anarchists were everywhere, a movement in constant movement. Having mastered the languages of the two largest groups of immigrant anarchists in the United States, Kenyon Zimmer paints intimate portraits of their Yiddish- and Italian-speaking worlds. The book will be required reading for all scholars of immigrant radicalism. More broadly, anyone interested in the complex intersections of class, mobility, and culture in our own times will find much to ponder in the cosmopolitanism and internationalism immigrants created as they responded to the violent nationalist politics of their own times."--Donna R. Gabaccia, author of Immigration and American Diversity: A Social and Cultural History Publication of this book was supported by a grant from the University of Texas at Arlington. 
Price: 90.25 USD
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