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LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES.

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES.

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1 GORKIN, MICHAEL & PINEDA, MARTA EVELYN. From Beneath The Volcano: The Story Of From Beneath The Volcano: A Salvadoran Campesino And His Family.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2011. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
In 1980 El Salvador was plunged into a bloody civil war, and Luis Campos, a peasant farmer, found himself drawn into a deadly political maelstrom of guerrilla fighting for twelve years. In this collection of fascinating and revealing oral histories, Gorkin and Pineda portray the personal and social lives of Luis and his family, who for the past eighteen years have been working to rebuild their lives in their new community beneath the Guazapa volcano. Luis, his mother, his wife, his in-laws, his children, and some neighbors recall in a simple and often eloquent manner their experiences of everyday life before, during, and after the civil war. Nin~a Bonafacia, Luis's mother, tells of the days before the war when two of her daughters were murdered and she fled with her family to a refugee camp. Julia, Luis's wife, recounts her life as a guerrillera during which, incidentally, she gave birth to the first two of her eight children. JoaquiŚęn, a neighbor and comrade-in-arms, discusses how he and others took control of the land of Comunidad Guazapa and began rebuilding in those turbulent days and months right after the war. Margarita and Francisco, the two oldest children, with candor and insight discuss the trajectory of their lives and that of the postwar generation. And at the center of all these stories stands Luis, the guerrillero, farmer, neighbor, husband, father—and raconteur par excellence. In sum, the multiple voices in From Beneath the Volcano combine to form a rich tapestry displaying a story of war, family, and community and provide a never-before-seen view of both the past and present El Salvador. This is a fascinating, engaging, and important work. It draws us intimately into the lives of one family in rural El Salvador. Through their voices, we come to understand how campesinos experienced the conflict of the 1980s—in guerrilla camps, refugee camps, and war zones—and the consequences of that conflict for their lives and relationships today. Gorkin and Pineda eloquently achieve what oral historians ultimately hope to do: they get us to care about these people at the same time as they enlighten us about the complexities of their lives. This is an extraordinary book. - Jocelyn Viterna, Harvard University 
Price: 52.25 USD
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2 GORKIN, MICHAEL & PINEDA, MARTA EVELYN. From Beneath The Volcano: The Story Of From Beneath The Volcano: A Salvadoran Campesino And His Family.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2011. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
In 1980 El Salvador was plunged into a bloody civil war, and Luis Campos, a peasant farmer, found himself drawn into a deadly political maelstrom of guerrilla fighting for twelve years. In this collection of fascinating and revealing oral histories, Gorkin and Pineda portray the personal and social lives of Luis and his family, who for the past eighteen years have been working to rebuild their lives in their new community beneath the Guazapa volcano. Luis, his mother, his wife, his in-laws, his children, and some neighbors recall in a simple and often eloquent manner their experiences of everyday life before, during, and after the civil war. Nin~a Bonafacia, Luis's mother, tells of the days before the war when two of her daughters were murdered and she fled with her family to a refugee camp. Julia, Luis's wife, recounts her life as a guerrillera during which, incidentally, she gave birth to the first two of her eight children. JoaquiŚęn, a neighbor and comrade-in-arms, discusses how he and others took control of the land of Comunidad Guazapa and began rebuilding in those turbulent days and months right after the war. Margarita and Francisco, the two oldest children, with candor and insight discuss the trajectory of their lives and that of the postwar generation. And at the center of all these stories stands Luis, the guerrillero, farmer, neighbor, husband, father—and raconteur par excellence. In sum, the multiple voices in From Beneath the Volcano combine to form a rich tapestry displaying a story of war, family, and community and provide a never-before-seen view of both the past and present El Salvador. This is a fascinating, engaging, and important work. It draws us intimately into the lives of one family in rural El Salvador. Through their voices, we come to understand how campesinos experienced the conflict of the 1980s—in guerrilla camps, refugee camps, and war zones—and the consequences of that conflict for their lives and relationships today. Gorkin and Pineda eloquently achieve what oral historians ultimately hope to do: they get us to care about these people at the same time as they enlighten us about the complexities of their lives. This is an extraordinary book. - Jocelyn Viterna, Harvard University 
Price: 23.70 USD
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3 HASSETT, JOHN J. & MUĄOZ, BRAULIO (EDITORS). Looking North: Writings From Spanish America On The Us, 1800 To The Present.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2012. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Given recent changes in politics and demographics, Latin America and the United States are becoming increasingly important to one another. Recognition of the two regions' differences and similarities may facilitate a more fruitful relationship, with increased respect and understanding. It is with this in mind that editors John J. Hassett and Braulio MuĖoz present a collection of writings that provides a look into the ways in which Spanish America has viewed its northern neighbor over the past two centuries. Gathered here are pieces by well-known figures from the worlds of Spanish American politics, history, philosophy, creative writing, and culture—names like Mario Vargas Llosa, Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Pablo Neruda. Divided into three sections, Looking North begins by underscoring the cultural and political differences between the two Americas. It opens with a speech by Simón Bolívar to the Venezuelan Congress in 1819 and closes with an essay by Mario Vargas Llosa from 2006 on the controversial wall being constructed between the United States and Mexico. The second section explores the experiences of Spanish American travelers in the US, beginning with an account of former Argentine president Domingo Sarmiento's fascination with the United States during his travels in 1847 and ending with a 2008 essay by Vargas Llosa on the city of New York. The final section encompasses creative writing and commentaries by some of Spanish America's most gifted poets and novelists. It opens with Rubén Darío's "To Roosevelt" from 1905 and ends with Christine GranadosŐ†s humorous and profound short story "Inner View," first published in 2006. Touching on history, sociology, politics, and religion, the writings assembled here will be of interest to humanists, social scientists, and anyone intrigued by the ever-growing connection between the United Sates and Spanish America at all levels. Includes writings from— Ciro Alegría, Salvador Allende, Germán Arciniegas, Mario Benedetti, Simón Bolívar, Ernesto Cardenal, Rubén Darío, Víctor M. Espinosa, Eduardo Galeano, Christine Granados, Nicolás Guillén, Gabriel García Márquez, Sergio Marras, José Martí, Gabriela Mistral, Pablo Neruda, Octavio Paz, Armando Roa, José Enrique Rodó, Luis Alberto Sánchez, Esmeralda Santiago, Domingo Faustino Sarmiento, Manuel Baldomero Ugarte, Mario Vargas Llosa, Irene Zea, and Leopoldo Zea. 
Price: 33.25 USD
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4 JOHN, S. SANDOR. Bolivia's Radical Tradition: Permanent Revolution In The Andes.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2009. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
In December 2005, following a series of convulsive upheavals that saw the overthrow of two presidents in three years, Bolivian peasant leader Evo Morales became the first Indian president in South American history. Consequently, according to S. Sándor John, Bolivia symbolizes new shifts in Latin America, pushed by radical social movements of the poor, the dispossessed, and indigenous people once crossed off the maps of "official" history. But, as John explains, Bolivian radicalism has a distinctive genealogy that does not fit into ready-made patterns of the Latin American left. According to its author, this book grew out of a desire to answer nagging questions about this unusual place. Why was Bolivia home to the most persistent and heroically combative labor movement in the Western Hemisphere? Why did this movement take root so deeply and so stubbornly? What does the distinctive radical tradition of Trotskyism in Bolivia tell us about the past fifty years there, and what about the explosive developments of more recent years? To answer these questions, John clearly and carefully pieces together a fragmented past to show a part of Latin American radical history that has been overlooked for far too long. Based on years of research in archives and extensive interviews with labor, peasant, and student activists—as well as Chaco War veterans and prominent political figures—the book brings together political, social, and cultural history, linking the origins of Bolivian radicalism to events unfolding today in the country that calls itself "the heart of South America." "This is an impressive book that incorporates a significant amount of research, including both oral histories and archival documents. The result is a model of historical scholarship." —Marc Becker, author of Indians and Leftists in the Making of Ecuador's Modern Indigenous Movements "This book takes you through 60 years of Bolivian history. . . You can't understand those 60 years of history properly unless you read this book. A remarkable work.ĺ —James Dunkerley, author of Rebellion in the Veins: Political Struggle in Bolivia 1952-1982 
Price: 57.00 USD
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5 JOHN, S. SÁNDOR. Bolivia's Radical Tradition: Permanent Revolution In The Andes.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2012. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
In December 2005, following a series of convulsive upheavals that saw the overthrow of two presidents in three years, Bolivian peasant leader Evo Morales became the first Indian president in South American history. Consequently, according to S. Sándor John, Bolivia symbolizes new shifts in Latin America, pushed by radical social movements of the poor, the dispossessed, and indigenous people once crossed off the maps of "official" history. But, as John explains, Bolivian radicalism has a distinctive genealogy that does not fit into ready-made patterns of the Latin American left. According to its author, this book grew out of a desire to answer nagging questions about this unusual place. Why was Bolivia home to the most persistent and heroically combative labor movement in the Western Hemisphere? Why did this movement take root so deeply and so stubbornly? What does the distinctive radical tradition of Trotskyism in Bolivia tell us about the past fifty years there, and what about the explosive developments of more recent years? To answer these questions, John clearly and carefully pieces together a fragmented past to show a part of Latin American radical history that has been overlooked for far too long. Based on years of research in archives and extensive interviews with labor, peasant, and student activists—as well as Chaco War veterans and prominent political figures—the book brings together political, social, and cultural history, linking the origins of Bolivian radicalism to events unfolding today in the country that calls itself "the heart of South America." "This is an impressive book that incorporates a significant amount of research, including both oral histories and archival documents. The result is a model of historical scholarship." —Marc Becker, author of Indians and Leftists in the Making of Ecuador's Modern Indigenous Movements "This book takes you through 60 years of Bolivian history. . . You can't understand those 60 years of history properly unless you read this book. A remarkable work.ĺ —James Dunkerley, author of Rebellion in the Veins: Political Struggle in Bolivia 1952-1982 
Price: 33.20 USD
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6 MEYERS, ALLAN . Outside The Hacienda Walls: The Archaeology Of Plantation Peonage In Nineteenth-century Yucatán.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2012. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
The Mexican Revolution was a tumultuous struggle for social and political reform that ousted an autocrat and paved the way for a new national constitution. The conflict, however, came late to Yucatán, where a network of elite families with largely European roots held the reins of government. This privileged group reaped spectacular wealth from haciendas, cash-crop plantations tended by debt-ridden servants of Maya descent. When a revolutionary army from central Mexico finally gained a foothold in Yucatán in 1915, the local custom of agrarian servitude met its demise. Drawing on a dozen years of archaeological and historical investigation, Allan Meyers breaks new ground in the study of Yucatán haciendas. He explores a plantation village called San Juan Bautista Tabi, which once stood at the heart of a vast sugar estate. Occupied for only a few generations, the village was abandoned during the revolutionary upheaval. Its ruins now lie within a state-owned ecological reserve. Through oral histories, archival records, and physical remains, Meyers examines various facets of the plantation landscape. He presents original data and fresh interpretations on settlement organization, social stratification, and spatial relationships. His systematic approach to "things underfoot," small everyday objects that are now buried in the tropical forest, offers views of the hacienda experience that are often missing in official written sources. In this way, he raises the voices of rural, mostly illiterate Maya speakers who toiled as laborers. What emerges is a portrait of hacienda social life that transcends depictions gleaned from historical methods alone. Students, researchers, and travelers to Mexico will all find something of interest in Meyers's lively presentation. Readers will see the old haciendas—once forsaken but now experiencing a rebirth as tourist destinations—in a new light. These heritage sites not only testify to social conditions that prevailed before the Mexican Revolution, but also remind us that the human geography of modern Yucatán is as much a product of plantation times as it is of more ancient periods. 
Price: 52.25 USD
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7 MEYERS, ALLAN. Outside The Hacienda Walls: The Archaeology Of Plantation Peonage In Nineteenth-century Yucatán.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2012. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The Mexican Revolution was a tumultuous struggle for social and political reform that ousted an autocrat and paved the way for a new national constitution. The conflict, however, came late to Yucatán, where a network of elite families with largely European roots held the reins of government. This privileged group reaped spectacular wealth from haciendas, cash-crop plantations tended by debt-ridden servants of Maya descent. When a revolutionary army from central Mexico finally gained a foothold in Yucatán in 1915, the local custom of agrarian servitude met its demise. Drawing on a dozen years of archaeological and historical investigation, Allan Meyers breaks new ground in the study of Yucatán haciendas. He explores a plantation village called San Juan Bautista Tabi, which once stood at the heart of a vast sugar estate. Occupied for only a few generations, the village was abandoned during the revolutionary upheaval. Its ruins now lie within a state-owned ecological reserve. Through oral histories, archival records, and physical remains, Meyers examines various facets of the plantation landscape. He presents original data and fresh interpretations on settlement organization, social stratification, and spatial relationships. His systematic approach to "things underfoot," small everyday objects that are now buried in the tropical forest, offers views of the hacienda experience that are often missing in official written sources. In this way, he raises the voices of rural, mostly illiterate Maya speakers who toiled as laborers. What emerges is a portrait of hacienda social life that transcends depictions gleaned from historical methods alone. Students, researchers, and travelers to Mexico will all find something of interest in Meyers's lively presentation. Readers will see the old haciendas—once forsaken but now experiencing a rebirth as tourist destinations—in a new light. These heritage sites not only testify to social conditions that prevailed before the Mexican Revolution, but also remind us that the human geography of modern Yucatán is as much a product of plantation times as it is of more ancient periods. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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8 MOR, JESSICA STITES. Human Rights And Transnational Solidarity: In Cold War Latin America.
University of Wisconsin Press, Madison: 2013. Critical Human Rights Series. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
With the end of the global Cold War, the struggle for human rights has emerged as one of the most controversial forces of change in Latin America. Many observers seek the foundations of that movement in notions of rights and models of democratic institutions that originated in the global North. Challenging that view, this volume argues that Latin American community organizers, intellectuals, novelists, priests, students, artists, urban pobladores, refugees, migrants, and common people have contributed significantly to new visions of political community and participatory democracy. These local actors built an alternative transnational solidarity from below with significant participation of the socially excluded and activists in the Global South. Edited by Jessica Stites Mor, this book offers fine-grained case studies that show how Latin America's re-emerging Left transformed the struggles against dictatorship and repression of the Cold War into the language of anti-colonialism, socioeconomic rights, and identity. Contributors: Alison J. Bruey Ernesto Capello Russell Cob Brenda Elsey James N. Green Christine Hatzky Margaret Power Sara Katherine Sanders Jessica Stites Mor Molly Todd Jessica Stites Mor is assistant professor of history at the University of British Columbia, Okanagan, and was research affiliate of the Instituto de Historia Emilio Ravignani of the University of Buenos Aires. She is author of Transition Cinema and coeditor (with Claudia Feld) of El pasado que miramos. "An excellent, cutting-edge volume that provides new insight into Latin American thought and forms of transnational organizing during the period of the Cold War." —Catharine C. LeGrand, coeditor of Close Encounters of Empire: Writing the Cultural History of U.S.-Latin American Relations "Draws from the best of historical and anthropological methods to document the ways in which courageous individuals and heroic families forged deeper ties of solidarity and built humane communities. Written with great passion and analytic precision, this book contributes to our understanding of an often overlooked facet of El Salvador's civil war and fitful democratic resurgence."—Greg Grandin, author of The Last Colonial Massacre 
Price: 28.45 USD
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9 NOLAN-FERRELL, CATHERINE A. Constructing Citizenship: Transnational Workers And Revolution On The Mexico-guatemala Border, 1880--1950.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2012. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, people living in the coffee-producing region of the Sierra Madre mountains along the Pacific Coast of Mexico and Guatemala paid little attention to national borders. The Mexican Revolution,—particularly during the 1930s reconstruction phase—ruptured economic and social continuity because access to revolutionary reforms depended on claiming Mexican national identity. Impoverished, often indigenous rural workers on both sides of the border used shifting ideas of citizenship and cultural belonging to gain power and protect their economic and social interests. With this book Catherine Nolan-Ferrell builds on recent theoretical approaches to state formation and transnationalism to explore the ways that governments, elites, and marginalized laborers claimed and contested national borders. By investigating how various groups along the Mexico-Guatemala border negotiated nationality, Constructing Citizenship offers insights into the complex development of transnational communities, the links between identity and citizenship, and the challenges of integrating disparate groups into a cohesive nation. Entwined with a labor history of rural workers, Nolan-Ferrell also shows how labor struggles were a way for poor Mexicans and migrant Guatemalans to assert claims to national political power and social inclusion. Combining oral histories with documentary research from local, regional, and national archives to provide a complete picture of how rural laborers along Mexico's southern border experienced the years before, during, and after the Mexican Revolution, this book will appeal not only to Mexicanists but also to scholars interested in transnational identity, border studies, social justice, and labor history. 
Price: 47.50 USD
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10 RICE, ROBERTA. The New Politics Of Protest: Indigenous Mobilization In Latin America's Neoliberal Era.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2012. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
In June 1990, Ecuador saw the first major indigenous rebellion within its borders since the colonial era. For weeks, indigenous protesters participated in marches, staged demonstrations, seized government offices, and blockaded roads. Since this insurrection, indigenous movements have become increasingly important in the fight against Latin American Neoliberalism. Roberta Rice's New Politics of Protest seeks to analyze when, where, and why indigenous protests against free-market reforms have occurred in Latin America. Comparing cases in Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and Chile, this book details the emergence of indigenous movements under and against neoliberal governments. Rice uses original field research and interviews with indigenous leaders to examine long-term patterns of indigenous political activism and overturn accepted theories on the role of the Indian in democracy. A useful and engaging study, The New Politics of Protest seeks to determine when indigenous movements become viable political parties. It covers the most recent rounds of protest to demonstrate how a weak and unresponsive government is more likely to experience revolts against unpopular reforms. This influential work will be of interest to scholars of Latin American politics and indigenous studies as well as anyone studying oppressed peoples who have organized nationwide strikes and protests, blocked economic reforms, toppled corrupt leaders, and even captured presidencies. 
Price: 47.50 USD
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