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JEWISH STUDIES.

JEWISH STUDIES.

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1 AIZENBERG, SALO; BERENBAUM, MICHAEL (FOREWORD). Hatemail: Anti-semitism On Picture Postcards.
Jewish Publication Society, New York: 2013. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Today e-mail, Facebook, and Twitter are sometimes used to spread hateful messages and slurs masking as humor. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries postcards served this purpose. The images collected in this volume make it painfully clear that anti-Semitic propaganda did not simply begin with the Nazis. Nor was it the sole province of politicians, journalists, and rabble-rousers. One of the most virulent forms of anti-Semitism during this time was spread by quite ordinary people through postcards. Of the millions of postcards exchanged during their heyday of 1890 through 1920, a considerable percentage carried the anti-Semitic images that publishers churned out to meet public demand, reflecting deep-seated attitudes of society. Over 250 examples of such postcards, largely from the pre-Holocaust era, are reproduced here for the first time—selected, translated, and historically contextualized by one of the world's foremost postcard collectors. Although representing but a small sample of the many thousands that were in print, these examples nonetheless offer a disturbing glimpse—one shocking to the modern sensibility—into the many permutations of anti-Semitism eagerly circulated by millions of people. In so doing, they help us to better understand a phenomenon still pervasive today. Salo Aizenberg, one of the leading collectors of Judaica picture postcards, is the author of Postcards from the Holy Land: A Pictorial History of the Ottoman Era, 1880-1918. "Hatemail, with its powerful visuals and brief explanations that contextualize these visuals, is a work to be treasured. It is also one to be dreaded and feared."—Michael Berenbaum, director of the Sigi Ziering Institute at American Jewish University and author of Not Your Father's Anti-Semitism "Among the best ways to determine the nature and degree of bigotry in a society is through its popular folk culture, and there are few better sources of such culture than picture postcards. As a postcard collector myself, I can only marvel at what Salo Aizenberg has collected in this volume. These remarkable postcards will make you laugh, cry, and clench your fist in anger."—Alan Dershowitz, author of The Trials of Zion "These postcards are a powerful and disturbing reminder that hatred can be as marketable as a commodity as a scenic view."—Historical Novels Review Finalist in the 2013 National Jewish Book Awards in Visual Arts 
Price: 30.35 USD
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2 ASSAF, DAVID. Untold Tales Of The Hasidim: Crisis And Discontent In The History Of Hasidism.
University Press of New England: 2010. First Edition. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
This fascinating volume reveals some of the dark, dramatic episodes concealed in the folds of the hasidic —cloak—shocking events and anomalous figures in the history of Hasidism. Using tools of detection, Assaf extracts historical truth from a variety of sources by examining how the same events are treated in different memory traditions, whether hasidic, maskilic, or modern historical, and tells the stories of individuals from the hasidic elites who found themselves unable to walk the trodden path. By placing these episodes and individuals under his historical lens, Assaf offers a more nuanced historical portrayal of Hasidism in the nineteenth-century context. 
Price: 38.00 USD
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3 AUERBACH, JEROLD S. Rabbis And Lawyers: The Journey From Torah To Constitution.
Indiana University Press, Bloomington: 1993. 0253208432 / 9780253208439 s Softcover. Good condition. 

Price: 11.16 USD
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4 BEHAR, MOSHE (EDITOR); BENITE, ZVI BEN-DOR (EDITOR). Modern Middle Eastern Jewish Thought: Writings On Identity, Politics, And Culture, 1893-1958.
University Press of New England, Hanover: . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
This volume opens the canon of modern Jewish thought to the all too often overlooked writings of Jews from the Arab East, from the close of the nineteenth century to the middle of the twentieth. Whether they identified as Sephardim, Mizrahim, anticolonialists, or Zionists, these thinkers engaged the challenges and transformations of Middle Eastern Jewry in this decisive period. Moshe Behar and Zvi Ben-Dor Benite present Jewish culture and politics situated within overlapping Arabic, Islamic, and colonial contexts. The editors invite the reader to reconsider contemporary evocations of Levantine, Mizrahi, and Arab Jewish identities against the backdrop of writings by earlier Middle Eastern Jewish intellectuals who critically assessed or contested the implications of Western presence and Western Jewish presence in the Middle East; religion and secularization; and the rise of nationalism, communism, and Zionism, as well as the State of Israel. 
Price: 26.79 USD
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5 BENFORADO, SALLY. Bring Me More Stories: Tales Of The Sephardim.
Floricanto Press, Mountain View CA. 0915745674 / 9780915745678 s Softcover. Brand new book. 
n these short tales, author Benforado weaves together the oral history of a family of Sephardic Jews, from their close knit home in Turkey to their new lives in America. They are stories of a heritage that spans the globe, of centuries-old traditions transported to a different world, and of people who held tightly to the ways of their ancestors, who, like them, left their homes to settle in a strange new land. Following their exodus from Spain in 1492, Sephardic Jews were not allowed to remain on Spanish territories in North America, such as New Mexico and Colorado. Any Sephardim who chose not to leave, had to convert to Catholicism. Many chose to emigrate and leave Spain, their ancestral land forever. The hardships faced upon leaving Spain were horrific for the Spanish Jews. Paris vividly describes the following: Although some Jews "traveled by donkey," the Jews of Spain, for the most part, literally walked out of their country. These refugees were the "scholars, the sons and daughters of families who had served their monarchs. . . shoemakers, tanners, butchers, the old, the pregnant, [and] the young." Extraordinary weather conditions, in the heat of summer, and the harshness of the land caused many to endure severe suffering. The Sephardim who had so much pride in their achievements could not believe their banishment. Traveling conditions were quite dangerous, especially in unsafe ships. Yet, many chose exile, and as Paris explains, " Those who chose exile were, for the most part, the salt-of-the-earth of Spanish Jewry: the artisans, the tradesmen, and the women—the historical carriers of religious tradition." An extraordinary civilization was lost in Iberia, probably to never again regain its glory. Bring Me More Stories stands as a living testament to a people born of their Hispanic ancestry, Jewish tradition and immigrant experience. Gloria Golden, Author of 
Price: 21.80 USD
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6 BERKLEY, GEORGE E. Jews.
Branden Publishing Co., Boston: 1997. 0828320276 / 9780828320276 First Edition (Unstated). s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Are the Jews an ethnic or religious group, smarter or more materialistic? What is their prized occupation, their biggest vice? What makes them different from the Irish, what is behind the boom in matza-pizza marriages? More importantly, are they disappearing? Are Germans their natural enemies, and was the Holocaust a German-Austrian phenomenon? Were the Dutch really friendly? How hostile were the Poles? Who helped the Jews the most, the Catholics or the Protestants? Includes an Index. 
Price: 17.05 USD
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7 BLUMBERG, ILANA M. Houses Of Study: A Jewish Woman Among Books.
Jewish Publication Society, New York: 2009. Updated edition with discussion questions. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Houses of Study is an eloquent memoir of a Jewish woman's life and her efforts to reconcile the traditions of her faith with her belief in women's equality and the pull of modern American living. Ilana M. Blumberg traces her path from a childhood immersed in Hebrew and classical Judaic texts alongside Anglo-American novels and biographies to a womanhood where the two literatures suddenly represent mutually exclusive possibilities for life. Set in "houses of study," from a Jewish grammar school and high school to a Jerusalem yeshiva for women to a secular American university, her intimate and poignant memoir asks what happens when the traditional Jewish ideal of learning asserts itself in a woman directed by that same tradition toward a life of modesty, early marriage, and motherhood. This Bison Books edition is updated with discussion questions. Ilana M. Blumberg is an assistant professor of humanities, culture, and writing at James Madison College, Michigan State University. "Tension wraps around the pages of Blumberg's memoir, an ardent intellectual autobiography by a woman in love with both Jewish texts and secular literature. . . . [H]er memoir elucidates . . . the passion for study no matter what a person's gender."—Publishers Weekly "A book that deserves a serious readership: a memoir that reads like a poem, a voice that's intelligent, brave, passionate and conversant."—Sandee Brawarsky, Jewish Week "This book is a union of letters and texts no less magnetic; to enter Ilana Blumberg's houses of study is, invariably, to become ignited."—Lilith "This is a poignant and perceptive account of how a highly educated Jewish woman managed to combine her extensive Jewish knowledge with her insights into English literature. Her journey toward mature awareness, so well described here, has many impediments and we are privileged to take this trip with her."—Morton I. Teicher, National Jewish Post & Opinion "Blumberg's moving memoir begins with her experiences learning at a woman's seminary in Jerusalem after high school, and comes to a close with her reflections on the challenge of raising her daughter to be a committed Jewish woman. The author struggles throughout her work to make peace with traditional Judaism and modern notions of women's equality. Her experiences confirm and elucidate the complex negotiations in which any woman must engage in today's society. . . . While this title certainly belongs in a generalist's collection, Blumberg's work will also strengthen libraries that focus on gender, autobiography, and Jewish women's role in modernity."—Jewish Book World "In its originality of approach, vigor and beauty of style, and fierce honesty in naming and exploring uncharted territories, this book is a great contribution to women's studies, autobiography and memoir, and Jewish studies."—Mary Gordon, author of Final Payments and The Company of Women Winner of the 2008 Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature Choice Award 2007 National Jewish Book Award in Women Studies Runner-Up 
Price: 13.97 USD
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8 BOYARIN, JONATHAN. Mornings At The Stanton Street Shul: A Summer On The Lower East Side.
Fordham University Press, New York: 2011. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Jonathan Boyarin is Leonard and Tobee Kaplan Professor of Modern Jewish Thought at the University of North Carolina. 
Price: 76.00 USD
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9 BOYARIN, JONATHAN. Mornings At The Stanton Street Shul: A Summer On The Lower East Side.
Fordham University Press, New York: 2013. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Jonathan Boyarin is Leonard and Tobee Kaplan Professor of Modern Jewish Thought at the University of North Carolina. 
Price: 17.10 USD
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10 COHEN, SARAH BLACHER (EDITOR). From Hester Street To Hollywood: The Jewish American Stage And Screen.
Indiana University Press, Bloomington: 1986. 0253203708 / 9780253203700 s Softcover. Good reading copy with bumping and staining to bottom edge of book. 
Examines the influence of Jewish-American dramatists, nightclub performers, vaudeville entertainers and film makers from 1920 to the present. 
Price: 60.56 USD
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11 EISENBERG, ELLEN. Embracing A Western Identity: Jewish Oregonians, 1849-1950.
Oregon State University Press, Corvallis: 2015. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Not all of Oregon's pioneers were Christian farmers or bachelor prospectors. Indeed, many of the first brick buildings on Oregon's newly platted Main Streets were built by Jewish merchants whose services were essential to town founding and growth. In Embracing a Western Identity, Ellen Eisenberg places Jewish history in the larger context of western narratives, challenging the traditional view that the "authentic" North American Jewish experience stems from New York. The westward paths of Jewish Oregonians and their experiences of place shaped the communities, institutions, and identities they created, distinguishing them from other American Jewish communities. Eisenberg traces the Oregon Jewish experience from its pioneer beginnings in the mid-nineteenth century to the highly concentrated Portland communities of the mid-twentieth century. Drawing on extensive archival resources at the Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education, this historical commentary explores patterns of migration and settlement, the place of Jews in the state's ethnic landscape, their engagement in politics, the development of institutions, and their relationship to Zionism. Departing from familiar treatments of the Jewish experience, Embracing a Western Identity provides a critical look at the impact of place and opportunity upon the identities of migrants both as Oregonians and as American Jews. Readers and scholars interested in western history—religious, ethnic, expansionist, and otherwise—will enjoy Eisenberg's accessible writing style and rich photograph collection. 6 ķ 9 30 Black and White Photographs and Illustrations, Tables, Notes, Bibliography, Index, 304 pages. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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12 FADER, AYALA. Mitzvah Girls: Bringing Up The Next Generation Of Hasidic Jews In Brooklyn. Ayala Fader
Princeton University Press, Princeton: 2009. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Mitzvah Girls is the first booqk about bringing up Hasidic Jewish girls in North America, providing an in-depth look into a closed community. Ayala Fader examines language, gender, and the body from infancy to adulthood, showing how Hasidic girls in Brooklyn become women responsible for rearing the next generation of nonliberal Jewish believers. To uncover how girls learn the practices of Hasidic Judaism, Fader looks beyond the synagogue to everyday talk in the context of homes, classrooms, and city streets. Hasidic women complicate stereotypes of nonliberal religious women by collapsing distinctions between the religious and the secular. In this innovative book, Fader demonstrates that contemporary Hasidic femininity requires women and girls to engage with the secular world around them, protecting Hasidic men and boys who study the Torah. Even as Hasidic religious observance has become more stringent, Hasidic girls have unexpectedly become more fluent in secular modernity. They are fluent Yiddish speakers but switch to English as they grow older; they are increasingly modest but also fashionable; they read fiction and play games like those of mainstream American children but theirs have Orthodox Jewish messages; and they attend private Hasidic schools that freely adapt from North American public and parochial models. Investigating how Hasidic women and girls conceptualize the religious, the secular, and the modern, Mitzvah Girls offers exciting new insights into cultural production and change in nonliberal religious communities. Ayala Fader is assistant professor of anthropology at Fordham University, Lincoln Center. "Mitzvah Girls is a rigorous ethnographic study of the education of Hasidic girls in Brooklyn. It is entertaining and engaging, combining personal accounts and subjective prose with critical analysis. . . . [Fader] analyses the use of language in contexts such as the classroom, playtimes and mealtimes to demonstrate how notions of Hasidic femininity are inscribed and transmitted through ordinary linguistic discourse." - Giulia Miller, Times Higher Education "A compelling and intimate picture of a society largely closed to outsiders, tracing the girls' upbringing from early childhood until marriage."--Miriam Shaviv, Jewish Chronicle "As a monitor of socialization in the very personal, private worlds of Hasidic women, this book is fascinating. Although it focuses on this very special group, it opens many avenues of thought for readers not generally familiar with Hasidic women and their lives." - Sybil Kaplan, National Jewish Post and Opinion "For a window into the rarely seen and little understood (at least by secular Jews) world of Hasidim, read Mitzvah Girls. . . . Fader, an anthropologist, focuses on girls and how they view their lives. . . . She captures their voices, their dreams, their moral vision." Sandee Brawarsky, Jewish Woman "Fader relies on years of ethnographic fieldwork in the Borough Park neighborhood of Brooklyn during which she delved deeply into girls' everyday life and what she terms 'Hasidic English,' a Yiddish-inflected hybrid evolving among these women." - Josh Lambert, Tablet "Fascinating. . . . The work maintains a scholarly character and possesses the intellectual nature of a scientific exploration, while remaining a pleasurable casual read." - Jewish Book World 
Price: 38.00 USD
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13 FISHMAN, SYLVIA BARACK. Double Or Nothing? Jewish Families And Mixed Marriage.
Brandeis University Press / University Press of New England, Hanover: 2004. Brandeis Series in American Jewish History, Culture and Life & HBI Series on Jewish Women h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
A lively and accessible look at Jewish intermarriage and its familial and cultural effects. Some observers believe America's promises are dramatically fulfilled by marriage across boundaries. Following their hearts rather than familial and communal preferences, intermarried couples illustrate the triumph of such Romantic values as the sanctity of the individual and the sacredness of personal passions. Intermarriages are also touted as emblems of increased tolerance. If intermarriage is a blessing, American Jews are among the prime beneficiaries. Recent statistical studies show that about half of all recent marriages involving a Jew have been to non-Jews. Many of these Jews maintain at least some ties to their own ethnoreligious heritage. At the same time, very few of the non-Jews marrying Jewish men and women today convert to Judaism. The same cultural tolerance that nurtures mixed marriage also promotes the idea that each partner can maintain his or her own distinctive, premarriage identity. Thus, the homes they form include two religious identities, and, often, two or more ethnic identities. The American Jewish resistance to intermarriage held by earlier generations has given way to the view that intermarriage is normative in the American milieu. But what is the impact of mixed marriage on Jews and Judaism? Concerned that intermarriage may weaken American Jewish vitality, many wonder: Will the blessing of American openness cause Jewish culture to be virtually loved out of existence in twenty-first-century America? This provocative question frames Fishman's study. Drawing on more than 250 original interviews with mixed-married men and women, focus group discussions with their teenaged children, materials produced by communal, secular, and religious organizations, and conferences, books, and films created by and for interfaith audiences, Fishman examines family dynamics in mixed-married households. She looks at the responses of Jewish and non-Jewish family and friends. She investigates how the "December dilemma" plays itself out in diverse mixed Jewish households and explores popular cultural depictions of mixed marriages in fiction, film, television, and in material artifacts such as the "Mixed Message Greeting Card Company." Fishman concludes with a look at Jewish communal responses from rabbis, schools, and synagogues, and the Jewish community to the potential demographic crisis resulting from mixed marriages. While understanding and accepting the cultural imperatives that have produced high intermarriage rates, Fishman emphasizes the key role of education in creating Jews who seek to remain affiliated. As one reviewer points out, her book offers a "well-thought-out response to a problem that has generated more hysteria than reasoned analysis." "Using her analysis of 254 original interviews with mixed marriage families, group discussions, as well as the latest survey data from the 2000 National Population Survey, Professor Fishman skillfully explores the impact of this phenomenon and what it means for the future . . . [by] stressing the important role of education in maintaining Jewish affiliation. In a fascinating section Fishman examines depictions of intermarriage in contemporary films, books and television. This book is a serious and valuable analysis of a phenomenon that is changing the parameters of American Jewish life."—Jewish Orthodox Feminist Alliance Journal "The book intersperses comments from the respondents into the text, which makes for interesting, accessible reading and also humanizes these much-discussed issues. Fishman also shows how interfaith families are depicted in American literature, film and popular culture and looks at the issue of intermarriage in Jewish societies historically."—New York Jewish Week " . . . Whereas previous studies have focused on numbers —thus providing a snapshot in time—[Fishman] brings the carefully researched stories of 254 mixed-married, intermarried and converted adults. [Fishman] goes beyond the statistics to provide a picture of how their religious identity evolved over the course of marriage. In the process, she ends up describing an enormous hybrid sub-culture of North American Judeo-Christian families, that differs 'strikingly' from all other American Jews . . . [An] insightful book."—Jerusalem Post Sylvia Barack Fishman directs the program in Contemporary Jewish Life in the Near Eastern and Judaic Studies Department at Brandeis University, where she is a Professor. She is co-director of the Hadassah-Brandeis Institute. Her most recent book, Jewish Life and American Culture (2000) explored the way American Jews negotiate the Jewish and secular pieces of their lives. Her earlier books include A Breath of Life: Feminism in the American Jewish Community (1993), named a 1994 Honor Book by the National Jewish Book Council; Follow My Footprints: Changing Images of Women in American Jewish Fiction (1992); and Changing Minds: Feminism in Contemporary Orthodox Jewish Life (2000). "Fishman...employs the social scientist's eye to explore family dynamics in order to illuminate the larger social and psychological dimensions of mixed marriages . . . Fishman's research reaches beyond the topic of mixed marriage to describe the complexion of American life in general, its perceptions, strengths and stereotypes . . . Given the high percentage of intermarried families, this book should find a ready audience that will resonate with the experiences of Fishman's interviewees."— Publishers Weekly 
Price: 28.50 USD
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14 FISHMAN, SYLVIA BARACK. Double Or Nothing? Jewish Families And Mixed Marriage.
Brandeis University Press / University Press of New England, Hanover: 2004. 1584654600 / 9781584654605 Brandeis Series in American Jewish History, Culture and Life & HBI Series on Jewish Women s Softcover. Brand new book. 
A lively and accessible look at Jewish intermarriage and its familial and cultural effects. Some observers believe America's promises are dramatically fulfilled by marriage across boundaries. Following their hearts rather than familial and communal preferences, intermarried couples illustrate the triumph of such Romantic values as the sanctity of the individual and the sacredness of personal passions. Intermarriages are also touted as emblems of increased tolerance. If intermarriage is a blessing, American Jews are among the prime beneficiaries. Recent statistical studies show that about half of all recent marriages involving a Jew have been to non-Jews. Many of these Jews maintain at least some ties to their own ethnoreligious heritage. At the same time, very few of the non-Jews marrying Jewish men and women today convert to Judaism. The same cultural tolerance that nurtures mixed marriage also promotes the idea that each partner can maintain his or her own distinctive, premarriage identity. Thus, the homes they form include two religious identities, and, often, two or more ethnic identities. The American Jewish resistance to intermarriage held by earlier generations has given way to the view that intermarriage is normative in the American milieu. But what is the impact of mixed marriage on Jews and Judaism? Concerned that intermarriage may weaken American Jewish vitality, many wonder: Will the blessing of American openness cause Jewish culture to be virtually loved out of existence in twenty-first-century America? This provocative question frames Fishman's study. Drawing on more than 250 original interviews with mixed-married men and women, focus group discussions with their teenaged children, materials produced by communal, secular, and religious organizations, and conferences, books, and films created by and for interfaith audiences, Fishman examines family dynamics in mixed-married households. She looks at the responses of Jewish and non-Jewish family and friends. She investigates how the "December dilemma" plays itself out in diverse mixed Jewish households and explores popular cultural depictions of mixed marriages in fiction, film, television, and in material artifacts such as the "Mixed Message Greeting Card Company." Fishman concludes with a look at Jewish communal responses from rabbis, schools, and synagogues, and the Jewish community to the potential demographic crisis resulting from mixed marriages. While understanding and accepting the cultural imperatives that have produced high intermarriage rates, Fishman emphasizes the key role of education in creating Jews who seek to remain affiliated. As one reviewer points out, her book offers a "well-thought-out response to a problem that has generated more hysteria than reasoned analysis." "Using her analysis of 254 original interviews with mixed marriage families, group discussions, as well as the latest survey data from the 2000 National Population Survey, Professor Fishman skillfully explores the impact of this phenomenon and what it means for the future . . . [by] stressing the important role of education in maintaining Jewish affiliation. In a fascinating section Fishman examines depictions of intermarriage in contemporary films, books and television. This book is a serious and valuable analysis of a phenomenon that is changing the parameters of American Jewish life."—Jewish Orthodox Feminist Alliance Journal "The book intersperses comments from the respondents into the text, which makes for interesting, accessible reading and also humanizes these much-discussed issues. Fishman also shows how interfaith families are depicted in American literature, film and popular culture and looks at the issue of intermarriage in Jewish societies historically."—New York Jewish Week " . . . Whereas previous studies have focused on numbers —thus providing a snapshot in time—[Fishman] brings the carefully researched stories of 254 mixed-married, intermarried and converted adults. [Fishman] goes beyond the statistics to provide a picture of how their religious identity evolved over the course of marriage. In the process, she ends up describing an enormous hybrid sub-culture of North American Judeo-Christian families, that differs 'strikingly' from all other American Jews . . . [An] insightful book."—Jerusalem Post Sylvia Barack Fishman directs the program in Contemporary Jewish Life in the Near Eastern and Judaic Studies Department at Brandeis University, where she is a Professor. She is co-director of the Hadassah-Brandeis Institute. Her most recent book, Jewish Life and American Culture (2000) explored the way American Jews negotiate the Jewish and secular pieces of their lives. Her earlier books include A Breath of Life: Feminism in the American Jewish Community (1993), named a 1994 Honor Book by the National Jewish Book Council; Follow My Footprints: Changing Images of Women in American Jewish Fiction (1992); and Changing Minds: Feminism in Contemporary Orthodox Jewish Life (2000). "Fishman...employs the social scientist's eye to explore family dynamics in order to illuminate the larger social and psychological dimensions of mixed marriages . . . Fishman's research reaches beyond the topic of mixed marriage to describe the complexion of American life in general, its perceptions, strengths and stereotypes . . . Given the high percentage of intermarried families, this book should find a ready audience that will resonate with the experiences of Fishman's interviewees."— Publishers Weekly 
Price: 16.34 USD
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15 FONER, PHILLIP S. The Jews In American History, 1654-1865.
International Publishers, New York: 1945. s Softcover. Good reading copy. 
Chapters include "Jews in Colonial America," "Jews and the American Revolution," "Jews and Jeffersonian Democracy," "Jews in the War of 1812," "The Jewish Community on the Eve of Civil War," "Jews and the Anti-Slavery Movement," "Jews and the Civil War." Bibliography and appendices also included. 
Price: 33.49 USD
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16 GOETSCHEL, WILLI. The Discipline Of Philosophy And The Invention Of Modern Jewish Thought.
Fordham University Press, New York: 2015. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Exploring the subject of Jewish philosophy as a controversial construction site of the project of modernity, this book examines the implications of the different and often conflicting notions that drive the debate on the question of what Jewish philosophy is or could be. The idea of Jewish philosophy begs the question of philosophy as such. But "Jewish philosophy" does not just reflect what "philosophy" lacks. Rather, it challenges the project of philosophy itself. Examining the thought of Spinoza, Moses Mendelssohn, Heinrich Heine, Hermann Cohen Franz Rosenzweig, Martin Buber, Margarete Susman, Hermann Levin Goldschmidt, and others, the book highlights how the most philosophic moments of their works are those in which specific concerns of their "Jewish questions" inform the rethinking of philosophy's disciplinarity in principal terms. The long overdue recognition of the modernity that informs the critical trajectories of Jewish philosophers from Spinoza and Mendelssohn to the present emancipates not just "Jewish philosophy" from an infelicitous pigeonhole these philosophers so pointedly sought to reject but, more important, emancipates philosophy from its false claims to universalism. Willi Goetschel is Professor of German and Philosophy at the University of Toronto. "In this stunningly erudite and imaginative study, Willi Goetschel argues that it is precisely because the very notion of a Jewish philosophy is contested that one may discern its overarching significance. While dilating on the "particularistic" concerns of their community from the perspective of universal reason, Jewish philosophers in effect challenge philosophy to revise its conception of the unity of truth and to embrace difference and alterity as defining constituents of the universal."—Paul Mendes-Flohr, Divinity School, The University of Chicago "Goetschel's new book is provocative, compelling, and profound. Tracing the influence of the thought of Spinoza, Mendelssohn, Rosenzweig, and Susman, among others, he shows how philosophy's claim to universality is necessarily undermined through its complex and troubled relation to Jewish philosophy. This book dramatically and definitively refigures the distinction between Greek and Hebrew thought upon which contemporary Western philosophy rests. The Discipline of Philosophy and the Invention of Modern Jewish Thought is essential reading for anyone interested in how philosophy became what it is and provides well-grounded hope for what it still could become."—Moira Gatens, The University of Sydney "A lively and intriguing account of many of the leading thinkers and controversies in Jewish philosophy, the text never fails to be both intelligent and provocative."—Oliver Leaman, University of Kentucky "Goetschel persuasively argues for Jewish philosophy as a field that does not articulate the meaning of an identity-stance, but as a mode of inquiry that shows how the practice of philosophy has not yet, and perhaps never will, reach the universality at which it aims. For him, only such a critical spirit can portend a better future and produce a robust civil society. He shows us how his view continues the arguments of the earliest strata of modern Jewish philosophy, how many contemporary academics have gone wrong in thinking that Jewish philosophy is a discipline that puts forth a unique positive content, and offers readers two Swiss Jewish exemplars -- Margarete Susman and Hermann Levin Goldschmidt -- from whom scholars can reclaim the field's original critical energy."—Martin Kavka, Florida State University "Goetschel's new book is provocative, compelling, and profound. Tracing the influence of the thought of Spinoza, Mendelssohn, Rosenzweig, and Susman, among others, he shows how philosophy's claim to universality is necessarily undermined through its complex and troubled relation to Jewish philosophy This book dramatically and definitively refigures the distinction between Greek and Hebrew thought upon which contemporary Western philosophy rests. . . . Essential reading for anyone interested in how philosophy became what it is . . . what it still could become." —Moira Gatens, University of Sidney 
Price: 33.25 USD
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17 GOETSCHEL, WILLI. The Discipline Of Philosophy And The Invention Of Modern Jewish Thought.
Fordham University Press, New York: 2012. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Exploring the subject of Jewish philosophy as a controversial construction site of the project of modernity, this book examines the implications of the different and often conflicting notions that drive the debate on the question of what Jewish philosophy is or could be. The idea of Jewish philosophy begs the question of philosophy as such. But "Jewish philosophy" does not just reflect what "philosophy" lacks. Rather, it challenges the project of philosophy itself. Examining the thought of Spinoza, Moses Mendelssohn, Heinrich Heine, Hermann Cohen Franz Rosenzweig, Martin Buber, Margarete Susman, Hermann Levin Goldschmidt, and others, the book highlights how the most philosophic moments of their works are those in which specific concerns of their "Jewish questions" inform the rethinking of philosophy's disciplinarity in principal terms. The long overdue recognition of the modernity that informs the critical trajectories of Jewish philosophers from Spinoza and Mendelssohn to the present emancipates not just "Jewish philosophy" from an infelicitous pigeonhole these philosophers so pointedly sought to reject but, more important, emancipates philosophy from its false claims to universalism. Willi Goetschel is Professor of German and Philosophy at the University of Toronto. "In this stunningly erudite and imaginative study, Willi Goetschel argues that it is precisely because the very notion of a Jewish philosophy is contested that one may discern its overarching significance. While dilating on the "particularistic" concerns of their community from the perspective of universal reason, Jewish philosophers in effect challenge philosophy to revise its conception of the unity of truth and to embrace difference and alterity as defining constituents of the universal."—Paul Mendes-Flohr, Divinity School, The University of Chicago "Goetschel's new book is provocative, compelling, and profound. Tracing the influence of the thought of Spinoza, Mendelssohn, Rosenzweig, and Susman, among others, he shows how philosophy's claim to universality is necessarily undermined through its complex and troubled relation to Jewish philosophy. This book dramatically and definitively refigures the distinction between Greek and Hebrew thought upon which contemporary Western philosophy rests. The Discipline of Philosophy and the Invention of Modern Jewish Thought is essential reading for anyone interested in how philosophy became what it is and provides well-grounded hope for what it still could become."—Moira Gatens, The University of Sydney "A lively and intriguing account of many of the leading thinkers and controversies in Jewish philosophy, the text never fails to be both intelligent and provocative."—Oliver Leaman, University of Kentucky "Goetschel persuasively argues for Jewish philosophy as a field that does not articulate the meaning of an identity-stance, but as a mode of inquiry that shows how the practice of philosophy has not yet, and perhaps never will, reach the universality at which it aims. For him, only such a critical spirit can portend a better future and produce a robust civil society. He shows us how his view continues the arguments of the earliest strata of modern Jewish philosophy, how many contemporary academics have gone wrong in thinking that Jewish philosophy is a discipline that puts forth a unique positive content, and offers readers two Swiss Jewish exemplars -- Margarete Susman and Hermann Levin Goldschmidt -- from whom scholars can reclaim the field's original critical energy."—Martin Kavka, Florida State University "Goetschel's new book is provocative, compelling, and profound. Tracing the influence of the thought of Spinoza, Mendelssohn, Rosenzweig, and Susman, among others, he shows how philosophy's claim to universality is necessarily undermined through its complex and troubled relation to Jewish philosophy This book dramatically and definitively refigures the distinction between Greek and Hebrew thought upon which contemporary Western philosophy rests. . . . Essential reading for anyone interested in how philosophy became what it is . . . what it still could become." —Moira Gatens, University of Sidney 
Price: 76.00 USD
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18 GOODMAN, PAUL. History Of The Jews.
J. M. Dent and Sons LTD., London: 1939. Revised Edition. h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Good condition. 
Details the History of the Jews with emphasis on the early years of Judaism, through pre World War II. Includes an Index. 
Price: 52.01 USD
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19 GRENVILLE, J. A. S. & RAPHAEL GROSS (EDITORS). Leo Baeck Institute Year Book 2003 (xlviii)
Berghahn Books, Oxford: 2003. 1571814752 / 9781571814753 First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 
Articles are in four sections: I. Religious Renewal - "Moses Mendelssohn's First Hebrew Publication: An Annotated Translation of the Kohelet Mussar" by Edward Breuer and David Sorkin and "The Dialectics of Religious Reform: The Hamburger Israelitische in Its Local Context 1817-1938" by Adreas Bramer; II. Jewish Social Life, Antisemitism and Jewish Reactions in Imperial Germany and during the Weimar Republic - Unter Uns: Jews Socialising with other Jews in Imperial Germany" by Marion Kaplan. "Ahlwardt on Trial: Reactions to the Antisemitic Agitation of the 1890s in Germany" by Christoph Jahr, "Tagesordnung Judenfrage -- A German Debate in the Early Stages of the Weimar Republic" by Jurgen Matthaus, "Leopold Jessner: German Theatre and Jewish Identity" by Anat Feinberg, and Fritz Rathenau (1875-1949). On Antisemitism, Acculturation and Slavophobia: An Attempted Reconstruction" by Christian Scholzel; III. Shattered Hopes Under National Socialism: "Emancipation and Assimilation in the German-Jewish Discourse of the 1930s" by Guy Miron, "Kurt Singer's Shattered Hopes" by Adam J. Sacks, and "Hans Litten 1903-2003: The Public Use of a Biography" by Stefanie Schuler-Springorum, and IV. "The German 'Righteous' Among the Nations": An Historical Appraisal" by Daniel Fraenkel. Includes an Index. 
Price: 23.47 USD
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20 GROSSMAN, AVRAHAM. Pious And Rebellious: Jewish Women In Medieval Europe.
Brandeis University Press, Waltham / University Press of New England: 2004. 1584653922 / 9781584653929 Tauber Institute for the Study of European Jewry Series & HBI Series on Jewish Women. h Hardcover, no dustjacket (as issued). Brand new book. 
The first complete look at the social status and daily life of medieval Jewish women. This volume, an amazing act of historical recovery and reconstruction, offers a comprehensive examination of Jewish women in Europe during the High Middle Ages (1000-1300). Avraham Grossman covers multiple aspects of women's lives in medieval Jewish society, including the image of woman, the structure of the family unit, age at marriage, position in family and society, her place in economic and religious life, her education, her role in family ceremonies, violence against women, and the position of the divorce and the widow in society. Grossman shows that the High Middle Ages saw a distinct improvement in the status of Jewish women in Europe relative to their status during the Talmudic period and in Muslim countries. If, during the twelfth century, rabbis applauded women as "pious and pure" because of their major role in the martyrdom of the Crusades of 1096, then by the end of the thirteenth century, rabbis complained that women were becoming bold and rebellious. Two main factors fostered this change: first, the transformation of Jewish society from agrarian to "bourgeois," with women performing an increasingly important function in the family economy; and second, the openness toward women in Christian Europe, where women were not subjected to strict limitations based upon conceptions of modesty, as was the case in Muslim countries. The heart of Grossman's book concerns the improvement of Jewish women's lot, and the efforts of secular and religious authorities to impede their new-found status. Bringing together a variety of sources including halakhic literature, biblical and talmudic exegesis, ethical literature and philosophy, love songs, folklore and popular literature, gravestones, and drawings, Grossman's book reconstructs the hitherto unrecorded lives of Jewish women during the Middle Ages. "It was long accepted that Jewish women in medieval times held little power and no leadership roles; there are few manuscripts or print sources describing their lives and no known works written by women, except for a handful of poems. That's why Avraham Grossman's Pious and Rebellious… is so welcome." —Hadassah Magazine "...[S]uch facets of the subject as the Jewish philosophy of women, marriage and family, economic status, culture and education, and role in religious life receive extended development. ... Highly Recommended."—Choice "These studies are thoroughly absorbing in every detail, and give an important voice to women whose voices have become almost completely muted over time, even though in their own age they were heard louder and clearer than ever before."—The Forward Professor Avraham Grossman, the noted Israeli historian of Jewish learning in the Middle Ages, has lately written a book unmatched in its erudition, reliability and composition. A topic many talk about but few have the facts—Jewish women in the Middle Ages-- has found its mentor. The master touched it and it sparkles." —David Weiss Halivni, The L.N. Littauer Professor of Classical Jewish Civilization, Columbia University "This pioneering synthesis addresses an issue standing at the cutting edge of contemporary historiography with sensitivity, respect for evidence, and sovereign mastery of a diverse and daunting corpus of texts." —David Berger, Broeklundian Professor of History, Brooklyn College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York The Table of Contents of this book is as follows: INTRODUCTION • The Historical Background • Sources • The Chronological and Geographical Framework • THE IMAGE OF THE WOMAN: PARTNER OR THE "OTHER"? • The Creation and the Superiority of Man • The Temptation in the Garden of Eden and the Superiority of Man • Characteristics of Woman and the Superiority of Man • Women and Sorcery • The "Medical Inferiority" of Women and the Superiority of Men • The Obligation to Perform Mitzvot and the Superiority of Man • Expressions in Praise of Women and their Perception as "Partner" • Between Image and Reality • AGE AT MARRIAGE • The Talmudic Heritage • The Sitation in Babylonia in the Eighth and Ninth Centuries • The Situation in Non-Jewish Society • The Situation in Jewish Society during the Tenth through Thirteenth Centuries • Factors Causing the Large Number of Childhood Marriages • Results of Early Marriage • ENGAGEMENT, BETROTHAL, AND THE CHOICE OF A MARRIAGE PARTNER • The Ceremonies and their Development • The Ban in Ashkenaz against Cancelling Engagements • Choice of Marriage Partner • Consensual MArriage in Christian Europe • The Institution of Matchmaking and Its Place in Jewish Society • MONOGAMY AND POLYGAMY • The Biblical and Talmudic Heritage • The Situation in Ashkenaz • Polygamy in Spain • The Atmosphere in the Polygamous Family • Levirate Marriage and Bigamy • FEMININE MODESTY AND WOMEN'S ROLE IN SUPPORTING THE FAMILY • The Talmudic Tradition • Modesty in Muslim Society • Modesty in Jewish Society in Muslim Countries • The "Miqveh Rebellion" in Egypt • The Sitation in Jewish Society in Spain • Feminine Modesty and Women's Work in Christian Europe • The Situation in AShkenazic Jewish Society • Changes in the LEgal Status of Women • WOMAN AS WIFE AND MOTHER AND HER ECONOMIC STATUS • The Woman within Her Home • Prostitution and Concubinage • The Woman's Economic Status • WOMEN'S CULTURE AND EDUCATION • The Talmudic Heritage • The Situation in Muslim Society • The Situation in Christian Society • The Stance of the Jewish Sages in the Middle Ages • Learned Women • Education of Women in Jewish Society • Girls' Education and Erudition in Ashkenaz • The Situation in Spain • Education of Jewish Women in Italy and Sicily • THE ROLE OF WOMEN IN RELIGIOUS LIFE AND IN FAMILY CEREMONIES • The Biblical and Talmudic Heritage • The Role of Women in Relgious Life in Christian Europe • The PErformance of Time-Linked Positive Commandments • Women in the Synagogue • Women in the Celebration of Passover • Women Circumcisers • Women as Ritual Slaughterers • Fast Days and Acts of Charity by Women • REfraining from Eating Meat During the Season of Mourning • Women as Bearers of Halakhic Traditions • The Role of Women in Family Ceremonies • WOMEN'S ROLE IN JEWISH MARTYRDOM IN EUROPE IN THE ELEVENTH TO THIRTEENTH CENTURIES • The DEscriptions of Women in Chronicles about the Pogroms • The Historical Reliability of the Descriptions in the Chronicles • The Role of Women in Jewish Martyrdom According to Christian Sources • The "Beauty" and "Purity" of the Women • Kiddush Hashem and the Cultural and Social Status of the Women • The Descrip=tion in the Chronicles and the Public Image • Between the Chronicles of 1096 and Sfer Zekhirah • VIOLENCE TOWARD WOMEN • The Tamuldic Tradition • The Situation in Christian and Muslim Society • The Position of the Babylonian Geonim • The Position of the Spanish Sages • Maimonides' Position • The Situation in France and Italy • The Situation in Germany • Wife Beating for "Education" • Summary: Between Theory and Reality • THE DIVORCÉE AND THE "REBELLIOUS WIFE" • The Biblical and Talmudic Heritage • The Attitude of Medieval Jewish Sages to Divorce • Grounds for Divorce • The Change at the Beginning of the Geonic Period • The Retreat from the Taqqanah of Moredet during the Twelfth Century • The Proliferation of Divorce in Ashkenaz in the Thirteenth Century and Thereafter • "Rebellion" of Women in Christian Society • Divorce in Spain • The Attitude of the Divorce • THE WIDOW AND THE "MURDEROUS WIFE" • The Large Number of Widows • The Biblical and Talmudic Heritage • The Situation in Non-Jewish Society • Life Expectancy in Europe • The Situation in Jewish Society: The Attitude to the Widow's Remarriage • The Commonness of Widowhood and its Social Significance • The Widow's Economic Rights • The "Murderous Wife" (Qatlanit) • SUMMARY: WOMAN'S STATUS IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE • The Positive Changes • Negative Changes • The Silencing of Creativity • Between "Pious" and "Rebellious" Women • NOTES • GLOSSARY • BIBLIOGRAPHY • INDEX. CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title 2005. Avraham Grossman is Professor of Jewish History at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, a member of the Israeli National Academy of Sciences, and recipient of the prestigious Israel Prize and Bialik Prize for Jewish Studies. "Avraham Grossman is an erudite and intellectually honest scholar who is helping to draw a true picture of Jewish women's lives."—Jewish Book World 
Price: 61.75 USD
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