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AMERICAN SOUTHWEST.

AMERICAN SOUTHWEST.

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1 Cities Of Gold: A Journey Across The American Southwest.
University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque: s Softcover. Brand new book. 
'This riveting true story recounts the author's journey on horseback across Arizona and New Mexico, retracing Coronado's desperate search for the legendary Seven Cities of Gold. First published in 1992 and now available only from UNM Press, this classic adventure tale reveals the Southwest as it was when Europeans first saw it and shows how much, and how little, it has changed. "The great myth of the American West," Preston writes, "is that there was a winning of it." Douglas Preston has written several books on the Southwest. He is also the coauthor of the novels Relic, Riptide, and Thunderhead (1999). 6 x 9.25 in., 480 pages, 1 map. "The Old West's last glimmers flicker through this piercingly beautiful adventure, an unforgettable saga in which Preston, astride his horse Popeye, traverses the desert and mountain wilderness of Arizona and New Mexico, retracing the trailblazing 1540-1541 expedition of Spanish explorer Francisco Vasquez de Coronado. . . . In place of the mythical winning of the West, Preston unfolds a harrowing tale of loss." -- Publishers Weekly "A vivid, often witty, account of riding through some of the most difficult terrain in the Southwest, and of some of the people, including Indians, who still live there. . . . the entire book is sheer pleasure to read." -- San Diego Union-Tribune "A fearful, fascinating tale." -- Los Angeles Times 
Price: 23.70 USD
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2 ADAMS, DAVID WALLACE. Three Roads To Magdalena: Coming Of Age In A Southwest Borderland, 1890-1990.
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: 2016. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
"Someday," Candelaria Garcia said to the author, "you will get all the stories." It was a tall order, in Magdalena, New Mexico, a once booming frontier town where Navajo, Anglo, and Hispanic people have lived in shifting, sometimes separate, sometimes overlapping worlds for well over a hundred years. But these were the stories, and this was the world, that David Wallace Adams set out to map, in a work that would capture the intimate, complex history of growing up in a Southwest borderland. At the intersection of memory, myth, and history, his book asks what it was like to be a child in a land of ethnic and cultural boundaries. The answer, as close to "all the stories" as one might hope to get, captures the diverse, ever-changing experience of a Southwest community defined by cultural borders—and the nature and role of children in defending and crossing those borders. In this book, we listen to the voices of elders who knew Magdalena nearly a century ago, and the voices of a younger generation who negotiated the community's shifting boundaries. Their stories take us to sheep and cattle ranches, Navajo ceremonies, Hispanic fiestas, mining camps, First Communion classes, ranch house dances, Indian boarding school drill fields, high school social activities, and children's rodeos. Here we learn how class, religion, language, and race influenced the creation of distinct identities and ethnic boundaries, but also provided opportunities for cross-cultural interactions and intimacies. And we see the critical importance of education, in both reinforcing differences and opening a shared space for those differences to be experienced and bridged. In this, Adams's work offers a close-up view of the transformation of one multicultural community, but also of the transformation of childhood itself over the course of the twentieth century. A unique blend of oral, social, and childhood history, Three Roads to Magdalena is a rare living document of conflict and accommodation across ethnic boundaries in our ever-evolving multicultural society. Published in Cooperation with the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Southern Methodist University About the Author David Wallace Adams is professor emeritus at the Cleveland State University. He is the author of Education for Extinction: American Indians and the Boarding School Experience, 1875--1928, also from Kansas. Choice Outstanding Academic Title. "The stories that [Adams] relates highlight the ways in which children in the Magdalena region internalized difference while simultaneously figuring out how to transcend the strictures of the worldview they had been raised with in order to find economic, social, and personal success. . . . Adams's writing style is engaging, and he presents readers with a plethora of intriguing stories from Magdalena." —H-Net Reviews "Throughout this account, the author successfully meshes children's experiences into a broader discussion of how family, community, religion, and place have influenced the coming-of-age process and identity formation."—Montana The Magazine of Western History 
Price: 33.20 USD
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3 ARRIGO, ANTHONY F. Imaging Hoover Dam: The Making Of A Cultural Icon.
University of Nevada Press, Reno: 2014. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
The mighty Hoover Dam, starting as a dream of land developers and farmers, became the most ambitious civil engineering project of the Great Depression. This landmark in the middle of the Mojave Desert, holding back the largest man-made lake in America, also became, like Mount Rushmore or the Empire State Building, a visual and cultural icon. The power and meanings of this icon came not through a single image but via myriad visual representations, in government propaganda, advertising, journalism, and art. Even before it was built, these images were used to shape the public's perception of the project and frame the dam as the linchpin to an expanding American economic empire in the desert Southwest. Anthony F. Arrigo has researched a wide array of primary sources and archival materials to trace the project from its earliest representations in illustrations to the documentary photography of its construction and later depictions of the structure in commercial promotions, fine art photography, and paintings. Analyzing Hoover Dam through the trajectory of imagery across several decades, rather than the narrative of its construction, illuminates the underlying cultural and ecological imperatives in the drive to build it, including the influence of religious doctrine and the American agrarian movement. Arrigo also discusses various portrayals of laborers, women, minority groups, nature, and technology in this imagery. In time, the visual icon of power and domination was commercialized to sell cars, vacations, and more. Imaging Hoover Dam is an important work in both visual rhetoric and media studies. It will also intrigue readers interested in such varied topics as the history of the American Southwest, the Great Depression and the New Deal, social and environmental issues, and American popular culture. Anthony F. Arrigo is assistant professor of English at the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, where he specializes in visual communication, rhetorical theory, and cultural studies. "Arrigo's Imaging Hoover Dam makes an important contribution to the field of visual rhetoric. The author's arguments are clear and insightful. Both scholars and general readers in American cultural studies will enjoy this fascinating account of the making of a major icon of industrial modernism." -- Carole Blair, professor, communication studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 
Price: 47.45 USD
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4 COOK, MARY JEAN STRAW; HOLLENBACK, AMELIA. Immortal Summer: A Victorian Woman's Travels In The Southwest: The 1897 Letters And Photographs Of Amelia Hollenback.
Museum of New Mexico Press, Santa Fe. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Two sisters embark from Pennsylvania in search of experiences in the Indian Southwest, newly opened to intrepid travelers. At Hopi they meet the day's most famous photographers and bring back rare images of this and other Indian lands that stand today as an America coming to terms with itself through its female adventurers. 7 x 10 in. 184 pages 85 black-and-white photographs. Mary Jean Cook is a classical concert musician and historian living in Santa Fe, New Mexico. She is a founder of the Friends of the Palace of the Governors. "In the summer of 1897, two well-bred and educated East coast sisters, Amelia and Josephine Hollenback, embark on a three month journey to the then-relatively unknown American Southwest…[Amelia Hollenback's] letters and black-and-white photographs come alive over one hundred years later." -- Library Journal 
Price: 9.45 USD
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5 COOK, MARY JEAN STRAW; HOLLENBACK, AMELIA. Immortal Summer: A Victorian Woman's Travels In The Southwest: The 1897 Letters And Photographs Of Amelia Hollenback.
Museum of New Mexico Press, Santa Fe. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Two sisters embark from Pennsylvania in search of experiences in the Indian Southwest, newly opened to intrepid travelers. At Hopi they meet the day's most famous photographers and bring back rare images of this and other Indian lands that stand today as an America coming to terms with itself through its female adventurers. 7 x 10 in. 184 pages 85 black-and-white photographs. Mary Jean Cook is a classical concert musician and historian living in Santa Fe, New Mexico. She is a founder of the Friends of the Palace of the Governors. "In the summer of 1897, two well-bred and educated East coast sisters, Amelia and Josephine Hollenback, embark on a three month journey to the then-relatively unknown American Southwest…[Amelia Hollenback's] letters and black-and-white photographs come alive over one hundred years later." -- Library Journal 
Price: 12.30 USD
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6 CUTTER, CHARLES R. The Legal Culture Of Northern New Spain.
University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque: University of Notre Dame Press, Notre Dame: s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Spain's colonial rule rested on a judicial system that resolved conflicts and meted out justice. But just how was this legal order imposed throughout the New World? Re-created here from six hundred civil and criminal cases are the procedural and ethical workings of the law in two of Spain's remote colonies--New Mexico and Texas in the eighteenth century. Professor Cutter challenges the traditional view that the legal system was inherently corrupt and irrelevant to the mass of society, and that local judicial officials were uninformed and inept. Instead he found that even in peripheral areas the lowest-level officials--the alcalde or town magistrate--had a greater impact on daily life and a keener understanding of the law than previously acknowledged by historians. These local officials exhibited flexibility and sensitivity to frontier conditions, and their rulings generally conformed to community expectations of justice. By examining colonial legal culture, Cutter reveals the attitudes of settlers, their notions of right and wrong, and how they fixed a boundary between proper and improper actions. Charles R. Cutter, associate professor of history at Purdue University is a specialist on the Spanish borderlands. "A superlative work."--Marc Simmons, author of Spanish Government in New Mexico "The Legal Culture of Northern New Spain is a book that every person who studies the Hispanic culture in the United States should not only have on their bookshelf, but should actually read." - Southwestern American Literature "This is a book that every student of Borderlands must read."-- Journal of the West 
Price: 26.55 USD
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7 FARMER, JARED. Glen Canyon Dammed: Inventing Lake Powell And The Canyon Country.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Growth is a major issue in the contemporary American West, especially as more and more towns and states turn to tourism to spark their economies. But growth has a flip side—loss—about which we seldom think until something is irrevocably gone. Where once was Glen Canyon, with its maze of side-canyons leading to the Colorado River, now is Lake Powell, second largest reservoir in America, attracting some three million visitors a year. Many who come here think they have found paradise, and for good reason: it's beautiful. However, the loss of Glen Canyon was monumental—to many, a notorious event that remains unresolved. Focusing on the saddening, maddening example of Glen Canyon, Jared Farmer traces the history of exploration and development in the Four Corners region, discusses the role of tourism in changing the face of the West, and shows how the "invention" of Lake Powell has served multiple needs. He also seeks to identify the point at which change becomes loss: How do people deal with losing places they love? How are we to remember or restore lost places? By presenting Glen Canyon as a historical case study in exploitation, Farmer offers a cautionary tale for the future of this spectacular region. In assessing the necessity and impact of tourism, he questions whether merely visiting such places is really good for people's relationships with each other and with the land, suggesting a new ethic whereby westerners learn to value what remains of their environment. Glen Canyon Dammed was written so that the canyon country's perennial visitors might better understand the history of the region, its legacy of change, and their complicity in both. A sobering book that recalls lost beauty, it also speaks eloquently for the beauty that may still be saved. Jared Farmer's writing has appeared in the Journal of the Southwest, the Utah Historical Quarterly, and the Western Historical Quarterly. He lives in Provo, Utah. "Anyone interested in the history of place, the effects of tourism on the West, or a fresh approach to the story of Lake Powell should read this fine and complex book."—Environmental History "[Farmer] had not been born when Glen Canyon was dammed and Lake Powell created in 1963, but he has a superb sense of the glory of the place before the Bureau of Reclamation came and put it under water. . . . There are several stories in this book, each important and well-told. . . . A particularly eye-opening section of the book is devoted to federal reclamation and the Big Dam Era of engineered water. . . . From the title to the last poignant line of his book, Farmer is a soul-mate of writer John McPhee, who in 1971 said there is something inherently sinister about dams and their function of 'humiliating nature.'"—Rocky Mountain News 
Price: 21.80 USD
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8 FOLSOM, BRADLEY. Arredondo: Last Spanish Ruler Of Texas And Northeastern New Spain.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2017. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
In this biography of Joaquin de Arredondo, historian Bradley Folsom brings to life one of the most influential and ruthless leaders in North American history. Arredondo (1776-1837), a Bourbon loyalist who governed Texas and the other interior provinces of northeastern New Spain during the Mexican War of Independence, contended with attacks by revolutionaries, U.S. citizens, generals who had served in Napoleon's army, pirates, and various American Indian groups, all attempting to wrest control of the region. Often resorting to violence to deal with the provinces' problems, Arredondo was for ten years the most powerful official in northeastern New Spain. Folsom's lively account shows the challenges of governing a vast and inhospitable region and provides insight into nineteenth-century military tactics and Spanish viceregal realpolitik. When Arredondo and his army—which included Arredondo's protg, future president of Mexico Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna—arrived in Nuevo Santander in 1811, they quickly suppressed a revolutionary upheaval. Arredondo went on to expel an army of revolutionaries and invaders from the United States who had taken over Texas and declared it an independent republic. In the Battle of Medina, the bloodiest battle ever fought in Texas, he crushed the insurgents and followed his victory with a purge that reduced Texas's population by half. Over the following eight years, Arredondo faced fresh challenges to Spanish sovereignty ranging from Comanche and Apache raids to continued American incursion. In response, Arredondo ignored his superiors and ordered his soldiers to terrorize those who disagreed with him. Arredondo's actions had dramatic repercussions in Texas, Mexico, and the United States. His decision to allow Moses Austin to colonize Texas with Americans would culminate in the defeat of Santa Anna in 1836, but not before Santa Anna had made good use of the lessons in brutality he had learned so well from his mentor. 5 maps. 
Price: 28.45 USD
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9 GOIN, PETER (PHOTOGRAPHY): PETER FRIEDERICI (ESSAYS). A New Form Of Beauty: Glen Canyon Beyond Climate Change.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2016. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
In Glen Canyon waters rose, inundating petroglyphs and creating Lake Powell. Now the Colorado River basin is experiencing the longest dry spell in modern history—one that shows alarming signs of becoming the new normal. In A New Form of Beauty photographer Peter Goin and writer Peter Friederici tackle science from the viewpoint of art, creating a lyrical exploration in words and photographs, setting Glen Canyon and Lake Powell as the quintessential example of the challenges of perceiving place in a new era of radical change. Through evocative photography and extensive reporting, the two document their visits to the canyon country over a span of many years. By motorboat and kayak, they have ventured into remote corners of the once-huge reservoir to pursue profound questions: What is this place? How do we see it? What will it become? Goin's full-color photographs are organized in three galleries—Flora and Fauna, Artifacts, and Low Water—interspersed with three essays by Friederici, and an epilogue gallery on Fire. The book includes two foldout photographs, which allow readers to fully see Lake Powell at high water and low water points Contemplating humanity's role in the world it is creating, Goin and Friederici ask if the uncertainties inherent in Glen Canyon herald an unpredictable new future for every place. They challenge us to question how we look at the world, how we live in it, and what the future will be. "Few have been more dedicated to tracing the past, present, and future of the American West than Peter Goin, whose photographs reveal our place in the landscape with a concerned and knowing eye. Yet never has his work felt more apocalyptic—Lake Powell, where we water-skied while Rome burned, offers a most fitting backdrop for our dire future. This is a sobering volume, and more than ever I feel I am looking at an elegy for the West."—Toby Jurovics, Chief Curator and Holland Curator of American Western Art, Joslyn Art Museum "The desert Southwest is a land of consummate paradox, and Lake Powell is, in a sense, the epicenter of paradox, disturbing and beautiful, inhumanly vast and yet vulnerable to anthropogenic impacts. A New Form of Beauty is an act of both grieving and celebration. Like the place it explores, this work is sublimely unsettling."—Scott Slovic, coeditor of Numbers and Nerves: Information, Emotion, and Meaning in a World of Data "This hauntingly beautiful book succeeds as an elegy on what we have lost and an introduction to an uncertain future."—Journal of Arizona History "Goin's photographs capture the dissonance of an environment evaporating before his eyes. The photos are infallibly stunning yet haunting."—Edible Baja Arizona 
Price: 38.00 USD
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10 HORTON, D. SETH & MYHREN, BRETT GARCIA (EDITORS). Road To Nowhere And Other New Stories From The Southwest.
University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque: 2013. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The Southwest of the twety-first century is full of surprises, and so is this collection of southwestern short stories published between 2007 and 2011. The writers represented here remind us that this is not the "Old Southwest" of gunfghters and sagebrush but, instead, a place of rock collectors, palm readers, and Russian mail-order brides. Well-known authors like Sallie Bingham, Ron Carlson, Laura Furman, and Dagoberto Gilb are joined here by exciting newcomers Eddie Chuculate, Don Waters, Claire Vaye Watkins, and others. D. Seth Horton is the editor of four previous collections of western short stories, most recently Best of the West 2011: New Stories from the Wide Side of the Missouri. Brett Garcia Myhren, an associate editor on Best of the West 2011: New Stories from the Wide Side of the Missouri, teaches at the University of Southern California and Saddleback College. "Jersey boy that I am, felt really happy when one of my stories, which happened to be set in New Mexico, found its way in to a previous number of this terrific anthology. And I am happier still to see another edition of it. What a good, good idea, and what fine stories, from some of our finest established writers, such as Ron Carlson, Laura Furman, Dagoberto Gilb, and Brad Watson, and from some new writers whose work we will remember well into the future. The landscape of a part of the country we love, the landscape of contemporary prose we love to read, the landscape of the human heart where we all remain residents, permanent and yet transient—these stories take you there." -- Alan Cheuse, author of To Catch the Lightning: A Novel of American Dreaming "The wise, tough depictions of these unforgettable roads to ruin will cause you surprise—and gratitude. The characters here are true creatures of the desert making their way through the Middle of Nowhere to Nowhere, through the dry river beds, the dry lake beds and wastelands, and to the irredeemable places of ghosts and gun culture. Always desiring to leave, they resolve to stay, to be damaged and to cause damage. They find no shelter from the truth of their choices, past and present. Reading this fine anthology is like traveling under the searing, purifying Southwest sky. 'Why have I come?' you will ask, and 'Why would I ever leave?'" -- Kevin McIlvoy, author of The Complete History of New Mexico: Stories "In this book the Southwest emerges as a region dominated by short, intercut 'sights' rather than John Ford or Park Service panoramas. The views of the Southwest presented here are fleeting glances—a San Diego neighborhood glimpsed from a freeway on-ramp, a baby's cry heard in the desert night, freshly graded roads to subdivisions that don't yet exist. These stories force the Southwest to face itself in a future neither tourists nor locals could have foretold."-- Phillip Round, author of The Impossible Land: Story and Place in California's Imperial Valley 
Price: 23.70 USD
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11 JENKINS, JENNIFER L. Celluloid Pueblo: Western Ways Films And The Invention Of The Postwar Southwest.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2016. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
The five Cs of Arizona—copper, cattle, cotton, citrus, and climate—formed the basis of the state's livelihood and a readymade roster of subjects for films. With an eye on the developing national appetite for all things western, Charles and Lucile Herbert founded Western Ways Features in 1936 to document the landscape, regional development, and diverse cultures of Arizona, the U.S. Southwest, and northern Mexico. Celluloid Pueblo tells the story of Western Ways Features and its role in the invention of the Southwest of the imagination. Active during a thirty-year period of profound growth and transformation, the Herberts created a dynamic visual record of the region, and their archival films now serve as a time capsule of the Sunbelt in the mid-twentieth century. Drawing upon a ten-year career with Fox, Western Ways owner-operator Charles Herbert brought a newshound's sensibility and acute skill at in-camera editing to his southwestern subjects. The Western Ways films provided counternarratives to Hollywood representations of the West and established the regional identity of Tucson and the borderlands. Jennifer L. Jenkins's broad-sweeping book examines the Herberts' work on some of the first sound films in the Arizona borderlands and their ongoing promotion of the Southwest. The book covers the filmic representation of Native and Mexican lifeways, Anglo ranching and leisure, Mexican missions and tourism, and postwar borderlands prosperity and progressivism. The story of Western Ways closely follows the boom-and-bust arc of the midcentury Southwest and the constantly evolving representations of an exotic—but safe and domesticated—frontier. "[This] critical examination of the Western Ways films illustrates how one independent filmmaker reinforced and challenged the dominant images of the Southwest produced by Hollywood, and romanticized art and representations that promoted the region for commerce."—Mark Neumann, co-author of Recording Culture: Audio Documentary and the Ethnographic Experience "A welcome glimpse back in time to a beloved area."—Southwestern Historical Quarterly 
Price: 42.75 USD
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12 JUDD, DENNIS R.; WITT, STEPHANIE L. (EDITORS). Cities, Sagebrush, And Solitude: Urbanization And Cultural Conflict In The Great Basin.
University of Nevada Press, Reno: 2015. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Cities, Sagebrush, and Solitude explores the transformation of the largest desert in North America, the Great Basin, into America's last urban frontier. In recent decades Las Vegas, Reno, Salt Lake City, and Boise have become the anchors for sprawling metropolitan regions. This population explosion has been fueled by the maturing of Las Vegas as the nation's entertainment capital, the rise of Reno as a magnet for multitudes of California expatriates, the development of Salt Lake City's urban corridor along the Wasatch Range, and the growth of Boise's celebrated high-tech economy and hip urban culture. The blooming of cities in a fragile desert region poses a host of environmental challenges. The policies required to manage their impact, however, often collide with an entrenched political culture that has long resisted cooperative or governmental effort. The alchemical mixture of three ingredients—cities, aridity, and a libertarian political outlook—makes the Great Basin a compelling place to study. This book addresses a pressing question: are large cities ultimately sustainable in such a fragile environment? Dennis R. Judd is a professor of political science at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He has published numerous books, including City Politics: The Political Economy of Urban America. Stephanie L. Witt is a professor of public policy and administration at Boise State University. Her publications include Urban West: Governing Cities in Uncertain Times, coauthored with James B. Weatherby. 
Price: 41.52 USD
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13 KESSELL, JOHN L. Whither The Waters: Mapping The Great Basin From Bernardo De Miera To John C. Fremont.
University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque: 2017. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Bernardo de Miera y Pacheco (1713-1785) is remembered today not only as colonial New Mexico's preeminent religious artist, but also as the cartographer who drew some of the most important early maps of the American West. His "Plano Geographico" of the Colorado Plateau and Great Basin, revised by his hand in 1778, influenced other mapmakers for almost a century. This book places the man and the map in historical context, reminding readers of the enduring significance of Miera y Pacheco. Later Spanish cartographers, as well as Baron Alexander von Humboldt, Captain Zebulon Montgomery Pike, and Henry Schenck Tanner, projected or expanded upon the Santa Fe cartographer's imagery. By so doing, they perpetuated Miera y Pacheco's most notable hydrographic misinterpretations. Not until almost seventy years after Miera did John Charles Frmont take the field and see for himself whither the waters ran and whither they didn't. 9.5 x 11 in. 120 pages 55 color plates. John L. Kessell, a professor emeritus of history at the University of New Mexico, is the author or editor of many books, including Remote Beyond Compare: Letters of don Diego de Vargas to His Family from New Spain to New Mexico, 1675-1706 (UNM Press). 
Price: 28.45 USD
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14 LAMAR, HOWARD ROBERTS. The Far Southwest 1846-1912: A Territorial History.
University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque. Revised Edition. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
This revision of a classic study long recognized as the most insightful and original account of the territorial period in the American Southwest will be welcomed by all readers of western history. The Far Southwest traces the history of New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, and Arizona from 1846 to 1912. Lamar analyzes the evolution of American political and economic systems to show, in particular, their impact on the racial and ethnic groups already present in the Southwest in 1846. In describing how American government and institutions such as the two-party system, trial by jury, and free schools were established in the Far Southwest, Lamar also puts into perspective both the local territorial history and the relationship between the region and the nation, particularly as regards issues of land tenure and church-state relations. This revision to the 1966 edition includes a new introduction, substantial additions to the bibliography, and some changes to the text and notes. Includes an Index. Howard R. Lamar is Sterling Professor Emeritus of History at Yale and a former president of that university. "The scope of this excellent book is large, in both geography and chronology." -- The Journal of American History "A unique, interpretive study."-- Choice "There is no better general political history for any of the four territories, or any other far western territories."-- Utah Historical Quarterly "Howard R. Lamar, with rare insight and a skillful pen, throws into bold relief the personalities, forces, and circumstances prominent in the 'politics of development' in each territory."-- Pacific Historical Review 
Price: 33.20 USD
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15 LAWRENCE, DEBORAH & LAWRENCE, JON. Contesting The Borderlands: Interviews On The Early Southwest.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2016. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Conflict and cooperation have shaped the American Southwest since prehistoric times. For centuries indigenous groups and, later, Spaniards, French, and Anglo-Americans met, fought, and collaborated with one another in this border area stretching from Texas through southern California. To explore the region's complex past from prehistory to the U.S. takeover, this book uses an unusual multidisciplinary approach. In interviews with ten experts, Deborah and Jon Lawrence discuss subjects ranging from warfare among the earliest ancestral Puebloans to intermarriage and peonage among Spanish settlers and the Indians they encountered. The scholars interviewed form a distinguished array of archaeologists, anthropologists, ethnohistorians, and historians: Juliana Barr, Brian DeLay, Richard and Shirley Flint, John Kessell, Steven LeBlanc, Mark Santiago, Polly Schaafsma, David J. Weber, and Michael Wilcox. All speak forthrightly about complex and controversial issues, and they do so with minimal academic jargon and temporizing, bringing the most reliable information to bear on every subject they discuss. Themes the authors address include the origin and scope of conflicts between ethnic groups and the extent of accommodation, cooperation, and cross-cultural adaptation that also ensued. Seven interviews explore how Indians forced colonizers to modify their behavior. All of the experts explain how they deal with incomplete or biased sources to achieve balanced interpretations. As the authors point out, no single discipline provides a complete, accurate historical picture. Spanish documents must be sifted for political and ideological distortion, the archaeological record is incomplete, and oral traditions erode and become corrupted over time. By assembling the most articulate practitioners of all three approaches, the authors have produced a book that will speak to general readers as well as scholars and students in a variety of fields. Deborah Lawrence is an emeritus faculty member in the English Department, California State University, Fullerton, and author of Writing the Trail: Five Women's Frontier Narratives. Jon Lawrence is retired as Professor of Physics at the University of California, Irvine. The Lawrences coedit Desert Tracks, the quarterly of the Southern Trails chapter of the Oregon-California Trail Association, and are coauthors of Violent Encounters: Interviews on Western Massacres. "In Contesting the Borderlands, Deborah and Jon Lawrence solicit lively, in-depth interviews with many of our leading scholars to capture the conflict-laden realities of historical New Spain's northern frontier as well as the contests over evidence and interpretation that shape our understanding. From one controversial topic to another, we hear the people behind the prose bringing each story to life. The conversation with the late David J. Weber—among the last we will hear from his penetrating and humane mind—is alone worth having."—James F. Brooks, author of Captives and Cousins: Slavery, Kinship, and Community in the Southwest Borderlands "Deborah and Jon Lawrence deliver nothing less than an engaging and stimulating experience that equips the reader with a thousand-year fusion of borderlands ethnography and history. Insightful, broadly cross-disciplinary, informative, and exceptionally readable, what these nine authors have to say encapsulates the most recent and best borderlands interpretative scholarship."—Janet Fireman, former editor-in-chief, California History 
Price: 23.70 USD
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16 LOEFFLER, JACK & MEREDITH DAVIDSON (EDITORS). Voices Of Counterculture In The Southwest.
Museum of New Mexico Press, Santa Fe: 2017. h Hardcover. Brand new book. 
This book pays homage to the counterculture movement through the words and photographs of a select gathering of people who lived it. At its height in the late 1960s and early 1970s, the counterculture movement permeated every region of America as thousands of activists took on the establishment. Although counterculture has often been trivialized as "dirty hippies" and "sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll," committed activists formed powerful strands of resistance to the political/military/industrial complex. American Indians, Hispanos, Blacks, and Anglos joined in marches and protests—often at their peril. Veterans of Haight-Ashbury in San Francisco, communards in northern New Mexico, practitioners of drug-induced mysticism, disciplined seekers of spiritual awakening, back-to-the-landers, defenders of wilderness—counterculturalists all—questioned, reframed, and redefined American and global perspectives that remain to this day. The American Southwest became a haven for individuals from both coasts seeking refuge in this vast landscape. Many found an affinity with the native cultures and local inhabitants who were already here. Others joined forces to combat the Vietnam War, racial discrimination, and pillaging of the environment. Still others founded communes based on diverse cultures of practice. Movement leaders organized community events, protests, and spoke for their generation; many used their talents as writers, musicians, artists, and photographers to express their angst and promote change. Jack Loeffler draws from his extensive archive of recorded interviews and transcribed conversations with contemporaries—among them writers, artists, elders, activists, and scholars—including Philip Whalen, Gary Snyder, Edward Abbey, Shonto Begay, Camillus Lopez, Tara Evonne Trudell, Roberta Blackgoat, Richard Grow, Alvin Josephy, David Brower, Dave Foreman, Elinor Ostrom, Fritjof Capra, and Melissa Savage. The book includes personal essays by Yvonne Bond, Peter Coyote, Lisa Law, Peter Rowan, Siddiq Hans von Briesen, Art Kopecky, Bill Steen, Sylvia Rodriguez, Enrique R. Lamadrid, Levi Romero, Rina Swentzell, Gary Paul Nabhan, Meredith Davidson, and Jack Loeffler. It includes photographs by Lisa Law, Seth Roffman, Terrence Moore, and others. 9.5" x 7.5", 208 Pages, 88 color and black-and-white photographs, Hardcover. 
Price: 33.20 USD
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17 MARSHALL, ANN; ZEPEDA, OFELIA (INTRODUCTORY ESSAY). Rain: Native Expressions From The American Southwest.
Museum of New Mexico Press, Santa Fe. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Explores the synergetic relationship between rain and the indigenous peoples of the arid and semi-arid Southwest. Takes an approach to Native American art by tying it directly to the life force of the tribes of the Southwest. It is a glimpse into the arts of southwestern tribes and a shimmering portrait of the desert's oldest miracle. 8.5 x 11 in. 144 pages 160 color images. Ann Marshall, Ph.D., is director of research and interpretation at the Heard Museum in Phoenix, Arizona. Her publications include Home: Native People of the Southwest and a history of the Heard Museum's collections. "Depicted are designs on paintings, pottery, textiles, baskets, kachinas, sculpture, jewelry and even musical instruments, showing the importance of the life-giving rain to these people." -- Southwest Books of The Year 
Price: 28.45 USD
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18 MATLOCK, GARY (TEXT); WARREN, SCOTT (PHOTOGRAPHS). Enemy Ancestors: The Anasazi World With A Guide To Sites.
Northland Publishing, Flagstaff: 1991. 0873584589 / 9780873584586 Second Printing. s Softcover. Very good condition. 
Bridges the gap between the many basic books on the Anasazi and the technical publications written by and for archaeologists and anthropologists. It will interest the armchair traveler as well as the person who seeks enlightened participation in the archaeological drama of the Southwest; in addition to covering the geographical, geological, cultural, and domestic contexts of the Anasazi, there is also valuable information on backcountry ethics, field dating methods, and more. 
Price: 38.48 USD
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19 MCPHERSON, ROBERT S. Sacred Land, Sacred View: Navajo Perceptions Of The Four Corners Region.
University Press of Colorado, Boulder: . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Dramatic geographical formations tower over the Four Corners country in the southwestern United States. The mountains, cliffs, and sandstone spires, familiar landmarks for anglo travelers, orient Navajos both physically and spiritually. In Sacred Land, Sacred View, Robert McPherson describes the mythological significance of these landmarks. Navajos read their environment as a spiritual text: the gods created the physical world to help, teach, and protect people through an integrated system of beliefs represented in nature. The author observes that the Middle East is of "no greater import to Christians than the Dine's holy land is to Navajos." He continues: "Sacred mountains circumscribe the land, containing the junction of the San Juan River and Mancos Creek, where Born for Water invoked supernatural aid to overcome danger and death and where, at the Bear's Ears formation, good triumphed over evil." The more one learns about the Dine, the more one inevitably admires their way of perceiving and interpreting what lies just beyond the focus of human vision. Their renowned respect for nature and way of living in harmony with the environment derive from their religious traditions. Robert S. McPherson: Robert S. McPherson is a professor of history at Utah State University, Blanding Campus and has published widely on Navajo and Ute history and culture. 
Price: 12.54 USD
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20 MERGEN, BERNARD. At Pyramid Lake.
University of Nevada Press, Reno: 2014. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Pyramid Lake is one of the largest lakes in the Great Basin, the terminus of the Truckee River flowing from Lake Tahoe into northern Nevada. This desert oasis, with a surface area of nearly two hundred square miles, is a unique geological feature and was home to the Paiute for thousands of years before the arrival of explorer John C. Frmont in 1844. For the Paiute, it was a spiritual center that provided life-sustaining resources, such as the cui-ui, a fish unique to the lake and now endangered. For the ranchers and farmers who settled on tribal lands, the waters that flowed into it were necessary to raise cattle and crops. Mergen tells how these competing interests have interacted with the lake and with each other, from the Paiute War of 1860 to the present. The lake's very existence was threatened by dams and water diversion; it was saved by tribal claims, favorable court decisions, improved water laws, and the rise of environmentalism. At Pyramid Lake is about more than Indians and water wars, however. It is the story of railroads on the reservation and the role of federal, state, and private groups interested in sportfishing. It is about scientists, artists, and tourists who were captivated by the lake's beauty. Finally, it is also a story of the lake as a place of spiritual renewal and celebration. Mergen grew up near its shores in the 1940s and returned frequently through the years. In this cultural history, he combines his personal remembrances with other source material, including novels, poetry, newspaper and magazine journalism, unpublished manuscripts, and private conversations, to paint a fascinating portrait of one of Nevada's natural wonders. Bernard Mergen is professor emeritus of American studies at George Washington University. His publications include Weather Matters: An American Cultural History Since 1900 and Snow in America. A native of Reno, Nevada, he lives in Franklin, West Virginia. "The book's breadth and depth add a great deal to our understanding of our northern Nevada locale and its context in a wider historic and literary milieu." -- Ann Ronald, author of Friendly Fallout, 1953 New York Times story, April 23, 2013, on saving the nearly extinct Lahontan cutthroat trout in Pyramid Lake. 
Price: 25.60 USD
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