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LATINO STUDIES.

LATINO STUDIES.

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1 ACUĄA, RODOLFO F. The Making Of Chicana/o Studies: In The Trenches Of Academe.
Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick: 2011. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
The Making of Chicana/o Studies traces the philosophy and historical development of the field of Chicana/o studies from precursor movements to the Civil Rights era to today, focusing its lens on the political machinations in higher education that sought to destroy the discipline. As a renowned leader, activist, scholar, and founding member of the movement to establish this curriculum in the California State University system, which serves as a model for the rest of the country, Rodolfo F. AcuĖa has, for more than forty years, battled the trend in academia to deprive this group of its academic presence. The book assesses the development of Chicana/o studies (an area of studies that has even more value today than at its inception)--myths about its epistemological foundations have remained uncontested. AcuĖa sets the record straight, challenging those in the academy who would fold the discipline into Latino studies, shadow it under the dubious umbrella of ethnic studies, or eliminate it altogether. Building the largest Chicana/o studies program in the nation was no easy feat, especially in an atmosphere of academic contention. In this remarkable account, AcuĖa reveals how California State University, Northridge, was instrumental in developing an area of study that offers more than 166 sections per semester, taught by 26 tenured and 45 part-time instructors. He provides vignettes of successful programs across the country and offers contemporary educators and students a game plan--the mechanics for creating a successful Chicana/o studies discipline--and a comprehensive index of current Chicana/o studies programs nationwide. Latinas/os, of which Mexican Americans are nearly seventy percent, comprise a complex sector of society projected to be just shy of thirty percent of the nation's population by 2050. The Making of Chicana/o Studies identifies what went wrong in the history of Chicana/o studies and offers tangible solutions for the future. Rodolfo F. Acuna is a professor of Chicana/o studies at California State University, Northridge. As an activist, scholar, and founder of the largest Chicana/o studies department in the nation, he has been a contributor to the Mexican American community for decades. He has been honored with numerous awards, among them three Gustavus Myers awards for outstanding books on race relations in North America and is the winner of a Choice Outstanding Academic Title Award. Among his best-known books are Occupied America: A History of Chicanos, which is now in its 7th edition; Anything but Mexican: Chicanos in Contemporary Los Angeles; and most recently, Corridors of Migration. 
Price: 71.49 USD
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2 ACUĄA, RODOLFO F. The Making Of Chicana/o Studies: In The Trenches Of Academe.
Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick: 2011. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The Making of Chicana/o Studies traces the philosophy and historical development of the field of Chicana/o studies from precursor movements to the Civil Rights era to today, focusing its lens on the political machinations in higher education that sought to destroy the discipline. As a renowned leader, activist, scholar, and founding member of the movement to establish this curriculum in the California State University system, which serves as a model for the rest of the country, Rodolfo F. AcuĖa has, for more than forty years, battled the trend in academia to deprive this group of its academic presence. The book assesses the development of Chicana/o studies (an area of studies that has even more value today than at its inception)--myths about its epistemological foundations have remained uncontested. AcuĖa sets the record straight, challenging those in the academy who would fold the discipline into Latino studies, shadow it under the dubious umbrella of ethnic studies, or eliminate it altogether. Building the largest Chicana/o studies program in the nation was no easy feat, especially in an atmosphere of academic contention. In this remarkable account, AcuĖa reveals how California State University, Northridge, was instrumental in developing an area of study that offers more than 166 sections per semester, taught by 26 tenured and 45 part-time instructors. He provides vignettes of successful programs across the country and offers contemporary educators and students a game plan--the mechanics for creating a successful Chicana/o studies discipline--and a comprehensive index of current Chicana/o studies programs nationwide. Latinas/os, of which Mexican Americans are nearly seventy percent, comprise a complex sector of society projected to be just shy of thirty percent of the nation's population by 2050. The Making of Chicana/o Studies identifies what went wrong in the history of Chicana/o studies and offers tangible solutions for the future. Rodolfo F. Acuna is a professor of Chicana/o studies at California State University, Northridge. As an activist, scholar, and founder of the largest Chicana/o studies department in the nation, he has been a contributor to the Mexican American community for decades. He has been honored with numerous awards, among them three Gustavus Myers awards for outstanding books on race relations in North America and is the winner of a Choice Outstanding Academic Title Award. Among his best-known books are Occupied America: A History of Chicanos, which is now in its 7th edition; Anything but Mexican: Chicanos in Contemporary Los Angeles; and most recently, Corridors of Migration. 
Price: 25.60 USD
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3 ALDAMA, FREDERICK LUIS WITH A FOREWORD BY ANA MARÍA SHUA. Long Stories Cut Short: Fictions From The Borderlands.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2017. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Art and bilingual prose illuminate hidden lives. Xbox videogamer cholo cyberpunks. Infants who read before they talk. Vatos locos, romancing abuelos, border crossers and border smugglers, drug kingpins, Latina motorbike riders, philosophically musing tweens, and so much more. The stories in this dynamic bilingual prose-art collection touch on the universals of romance, family, migration and expulsion, and everyday life in all its zany configurations. Each glimpse into lives at every stage—from newborns and children to teens, young adults, and the elderly—further submerges readers in psychological ups and downs. In a world filled with racism, police brutality, poverty, and tensions between haves and have-nots, these flashes of fictional insight bring gleaming clarity to life lived where all sorts of borders meet and shift. Frederick Luis Aldama and graphic artists from Mapache Studios give shape to ugly truths in the most honest way, creating new perceptions, thoughts, and feelings about life in the borderlands of the Amricas. Each bilingual prose-art fictional snapshot offers an unsentimentally complex glimpse into what it means to exist at the margins of society today. These unflinching and often brutal fictions crisscross spiritual, emotional, and physical borders as they give voice to all those whom society chooses not to see. Frederick Luis Aldama is Arts and Humanities Distinguished Professor of English and University Distinguished Scholar at The Ohio State University. He is founder and director of LASER, a mentoring and research hub for Latinos, and the author, co-author, and editor of twenty-six books, including Your Brain on Latino Comics: From Gus Arriola to Los Bros Hernandez and The Cinema of Robert Rodriguez.. "Buzzin' from start to finish, an unexpected bilingual knock-out punch!"—Juan Felipe Herrera "Aldama stuns, surprises, and delights. This is no small feat. He is a linguistic trapeze high-wire artist and delivers verbal theatrics, the likes of which will stay in your mind and heart for a very long time."—Denise Chavez 
Price: 18.95 USD
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4 BARNET-SANCHEZ, HOLLY & TIM DRESCHER. Give Me Life: Iconography And Identity In East L A Murals.
University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque: h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Chicanismo, the idea of what it means to be Chicano, was born in the 1970s, when grassroots activists, academics, and artists joined forces in the civil rights movimiento that spread new ideas about Mexican American history and identity. The community murals those artists painted in the barrios of East Los Angeles were a powerful part of that cultural vitality, and these artworks have been an important feature of LA culture ever since. This book offers detailed analyses of individual East LA murals, sets them in social context, and explains how they were produced. Leading experts on mural art, the authors use a distinctive methodology, analyzing the art from aesthetic, political, and cultural perspectives to show how murals and graffiti reflected and influenced the Chicano civil rights movement. 10 x 8 in., 440 pages, 191 color photos, 7 halftones, 11 maps. 
Price: 47.50 USD
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5 CAMMAROTA, JULIO. SueĖos Americanos: Barrio Youth Negotiating Social And Cultural Identities.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2008. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Education is a primary route to rewarding employment and economic security. It is particularly significant for the future prospects of children who are ethnic minorities, were born into disadvantaged economic circumstances, or are dealing with language barriers. For nearly eight years Julio Cammarota interviewed and observed Latino youth between the ages of seventeen and twenty-four who lived in a barrio in a city on the California coast. He conducted forty life interviews, selecting six people to investigate in depth. Twenty of the study participants worked at a fast-food restaurant, while the other twenty worked at a community cultural center. Focusing on the experiences of his subjects in the primary settings of family, work, and school, Cammarota structured his research to examine how Latino youth negotiate myriad social conditions and hostile economic and political pressures in their daily lives. His extensive interviews and incisive analyses illuminate the complex relationships among low-wage employment, cultural standards, education, class oppression, and gender expectations. Among other topics, Cammarota investigates how working affects Latino education; how gender influences social relationships and life choices; how Latinos and Latinas try to maintain their distinct ethnic identity while attempting to transcend marginalization; whether the Latino culture helps young people work hard for their families and for a better future; and how the connections and disconnections among work, family, and school constitute formative processes that shape the cultural identities of Latino youth. One of the most extensive studies of barrio youth available, SueŮos Americanos concludes with a discussion of social justice education for Latino youth and how this educational approach meets their academic needs while providing opportunities for self-determination and community activism. "Julio Cammarota's book is a fresh and insightful look at educating Latino/a youth in the United States. - Journal of American Ethnic History "Cammarota is a skilled writer who injects passion into this ethnographic study." - Multi-Cultural Review 
Price: 37.95 USD
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6 CAVALCANTI, H. B. Almost Home: A Brazilian American's Reflections On Faith, Culture, And Immigration.
The University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, Milwaukee and London: . s Softcover. Brand new book. 

Price: 28.45 USD
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7 CHABRAM-DERNERSESIAN, ANGIE & DE LA TORRE, ADELA (EDITORS). Speaking From The Body: Latinas On Health And Culture.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2008. First Peoples Studies Series. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
In compelling first-person accounts, Latinas speak freely about dealing with serious health episodes as patients, family caregivers, or friends. They show how the complex interweaving of gender, class, and race impacts the health status of Latinas—and how family, spirituality, and culture affect the experience of illness. Here are stories of Latinas living with conditions common to many: hypertension, breast cancer, obesity, diabetes, depression, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, dementia, Parkinson's, lupus, and hyper/hypothyroidism. By bringing these narratives out from the shadows of private lives, they demonstrate how such ailments form part of the larger whole of Latina lives that encompasses family, community, the medical profession, and society. They show how personal identity and community intersect to affect the interpretation of illness, compliance with treatment, and the utilization of allopathic medicine, alternative therapies, and traditional healing practices. The book also includes a retrospective analysis of the narratives and a discussion of Latina health issues and policy recommendations. These Latina cultural narratives illustrate important aspects of the social contexts and real-world family relationships crucial to understanding illness. Speaking from the Body is a trailblazing collection of personal testimonies that integrates professional and personal perspectives and shows that our understanding of health remains incomplete if Latina cultural narratives are not included. Contains compelling first hand accounts of Latinas speaking freely about dealing with serious health episodes. —Dialogo Chabram-Dernersesian and de la Torre have compiled an excellent collection of Latina personal health narratives that helps readers better understand the insider, emic perspective on Latina worldviews surrounding health, illness and culture. — CHOICE 
Price: 25.60 USD
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8 FALCONER, BLAS (EDITOR); LOPEZ, LORRAINE M. (EDITOR). The Other Latin@: Writing Against A Singular Identity.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The sheernumber of different ethnic groups and cultures in the United States makes it tempting to classify them according to broad stereotypes, ignoring their unique and changing identities. Because of their growing diversity within the United States, Latinas and Latinos face this problem in their everyday lives. With cultural roots in Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, or a variety of other locales, Hispanic-origin people in the United States are too often consigned to a single category. With this book Blas Falconer and Lorraine M. Lopez set out to change this. The Other Latin@ is a diverse collection of essays written by some of the best emerging and established contemporary writers of Latin origin to help answer the question: How can we treat U.S. Latina and Latino literature as a definable whole while acknowledging the many shifting identities within their cultures? By telling their own stories, these authors illuminate the richness of their cultural backgrounds while adding a unique perspective to Latina and Latino literature. This book sheds light on the dangers of abandoning identity by accepting cultural stereotypes and ignoring diversity within diversity. These contributors caution against judging literature based on the race of the author and lament the use of the term Hispanic to erase individuality. Honestly addressing difficult issues, this book will greatly contribute to a better understanding of Latina and Latino literature and identity. 
Price: 20.38 USD
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9 GARCÍA, IGNACIO M. White But Not Equal: Mexican Americans, Jury Discrimination, And The Supreme Court.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2008. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Check out "A Class Apart" - the new PBS American Experience documentary that explores this historic case! In 1952 in Edna, Texas, Pete Hernandez, a twenty-one-year-old cotton picker, got into a fight with several men and was dragged from a tavern, robbed, and beaten. Upon reaching his home he collected his .22-caliber rifle, walked two miles back to the tavern, and shot one of the assailants. With forty eyewitnesses and a confession, the case appeared to be open and shut. Yet Hernandez v. Texas turned into one of the nation's most groundbreaking Supreme Court cases. Ignacio Garcia's White But Not Equal explores this historic but mostly forgotten case, which became the first to recognize discrimination against Mexican Americans. Led by three dedicated Mexican American lawyers, the case argued for recognition of Mexican Americans under the 14th Amendment as a "class apart." Despite a distinct history and culture, Mexican Americans were considered white by law during this period, yet in reality they were subjected to prejudice and discrimination. This was reflected in Hernandez's trial, in which none of the selected jurors were Mexican American. The concept of Latino identity began to shift as the demand for inclusion in the political and judicial system began. Garcia places the Hernandez v. Texas case within a historical perspective and examines the changing Anglo-Mexican relationship. More than just a legal discussion, this book looks at the whole case from start to finish and examines all the major participants, placing the story within the larger issue of the fight for Mexican American civil rights. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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10 GARCÍA, JUAN R. Mexicans In The Midwest, 1900-1932.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2004 . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Early in this century, a few Mexican migrants began streaming northward into the Midwest, but by 1914 - in response to the war in Europe and a booming U.S. economy - the stream had become a flood. Barely a generation later, this so-called Immigrant Generation of Mexicans was displaced and returned to the U.S. Southwest or to Mexico. Drawing on both published works and archival materials, this new study considers the many factors that affected the process of immigration as well as the development of communities in the region. These include the internal forces of religion, ethnic identity, and a sense of nationalism, as well as external influences such as economic factors, discrimination, and the vagaries of U.S.-Mexico relations. Here is a book that persuasively challenges many prevailing assumptions about Mexican people and the communities they established in the Midwest. The author notes the commonalities and differences between Mexicans in that region and their compadres who settled elsewhere. He further demonstrates that although Mexicans in the Midwest maintained a strong sense of cultural identity, they were quick to adopt the consumer culture and other elements of U.S. life that met their needs. Focusing on a people, place, and time rarely covered before now, this wide-ranging work will be welcomed by scholars and students of history, sociology, and Chicano studies. General readers interested in ethnic issues and the multicultural fabric of American society will find here a window to the past as well as new perspectives for understanding the present and the future. "A must for scholars in the field of Mexican American studies. . . . A gripping narrative of the beginning of the Mexican migration to the Midwest and the conditions under which these migrants lived. He describes social and economic forces that shaped their lives, such as discrimination and overcrowded housing, as well as the mechanisms through which they survived." —Choice "Will be of great interest to scholars and students with diverse interests. . . . A 'must read' for students of Latin American, United States, and regional history; ethnic and diplomatic history; and those persons wishing to learn more about Mexicans in the Midwestern United States." —Journal of the West "An important book on a significant and neglected topic . . . Garcia's work takes a fundamental step in recording the part Mexicans played in the development of the Midwest." —Great Plains Quarterly "A solid general treatment of a Mexican generation in the Midwest and is sure to be widely consulted by both scholars and a general audience." —Journal of History 
Price: 23.70 USD
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11 GARCÍA, MARIO T. Literature As History: Autobiography, Testimonio, And The Novel In The Chicano And Latino Experience.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2016. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Historical documents—and, for that matter, historical sources—exist in many forms. The traditional archival sources such as official documents, newspapers, correspondence, and diaries can be supplemented by personal archives, oral histories, and even works of fiction in order for historians to illuminate the past. Literature as History offers a critical new path for Chicano and Latino history. Historian Mario T. Garcia analyzes prominent works of Chicano fiction, nonfiction, and autobiographical literature to explore how they can sometimes reveal even more about ordinary people's lives. Garcia argues that this approach can yield personal insights into historical events that more formal documents omit, lending insights into such diverse issues as gender identity, multiculturalism, sexuality, and the concerns of the working class. In a stimulating and imaginative look at the intersection of history and literature, Garcia discusses the meaning and intent of narratives. Literature as History represents a unique way to rethink history. Garcia, a leader in the field of Chicano history and one of the foremost historians of his generation, explores how Chicano historians can use Chicano and Latino literature as important historical sources. Autobiography, testimonio, and fiction are the genres the author researches to obtain new and insightful perspectives on Chicano history at the personal and grassroots levels. Breaking the boundaries between history and literature, Garcia provides a thought-provoking discussion of what constitutes a historical source. "Garcia's latest work changes the landscape of Chicano and Latino literature and history in profound ways."—Choice "An incisive exploration of the multiple tracks [Chicano and Latino] authors have taken in writing about themselves and their community."—Southwestern Historical Quarterly "Fascinating and compelling."—Western Historical Quarterly "[Literature as History] offers an extraordinary example of how to provide historical validity and marry fiction with history."—Bulletin of Spanish Studies "Literature as History reexamines the unresolved relationship between a community's cultural artifacts and its lived historical experience. By approaching literary texts as important parts of the Chicana/o and Latina/o archive, Garcia's study will be instructive for young scholars in a variety of academic disciplines. More important, it will provide teachers a road map for revealing to their students the complexity of the past and its relevance for their present and their future."—George Mariscal, author of Brown-Eyed Children of the Sun: Lessons from the Chicano Movement, 1965-1975 "Finally, a much-needed extensive history of Chicano literature as historical discourse. Amply footnoted, the work covers all genres, thus giving the reader a vision rarely found in any other available work. In brief, a keeper and well worth the reader's time."—Rolando Hinojosa-Smith, author of A Voice of My Own: Essays and Stories 
Price: 52.25 USD
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12 GARCÍA-ROMERO, ANNE. The Fornes Frame: Contemporary Latina Playwrights And The Legacy Of Maria Irene Fornes.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2016. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
A key way to view Latina plays today is through the foundational frame of playwright and teacher Maria Irene Fornes, who has trained a generation of theatre artists and transformed the field of American theatre. Fornes, author of Fefu and Her Friends and Sarita and a nine-time Obie Award winner, is known for her plays that traverse cultural, spiritual, and aesthetic borders. In The Fornes Frame: Contemporary Latina Playwrights and the Legacy of Maria Irene Fornes, Anne Garcia-Romero considers the work of five award-winning Latina playwrights in the early twenty-first century, offering her unique perspective as a theatre studies scholar who is also a professional playwright. The playwrights in this book include Pulitzer Prize-winner Quiara Alegria Hudes; Obie Award-winner Caridad Svich; Karen Zacarias, resident playwright at Arena Stage in Washington, DC; Elaine Romero, member of the Goodman Theatre Playwrights Unit in Chicago, Illinois; and Cusi Cram, company member of the LAByrinth Theater Company in New York City. Using four key concepts—cultural multiplicity, supernatural intervention, Latina identity, and theatrical experimentation—Garcia-Romero shows how these playwrights expand past a consideration of a single culture toward broader, simultaneous connections to diverse cultures. The playwrights also experiment with the theatrical form as they redefine what a Latina play can be. Following Fornes's legacy, these playwrights continue to contest and complicate Latina theatre. "A privileged insider look into the works of these five outstanding playwrights."—Teresa Marrero, co-editor of Out of the Fringe: Contemporary Latina/Latino Theatre and Performance Anne Garcia-Romero is a playwright and scholar of theater studies. She is a founding member of the Latinx Theatre Commons and is the Thomas J. and Robert T. Rolfs Assistant Professor of Film, Television and Theatre at the University of Notre Dame. "The author's conclusions about Fornes and the generation of Latina dramatists are incredibly important and insightful."—Tiffany Ana Lopez, editor of Growing up Chicana/o: An Anthology "It takes time to appreciate fully the impact of a writer's work and her teachings. This eloquent book is the result of Fornes's legacy and the many Latina writers she inspired."—Nilo Cruz, author of Anna in the Tropics 
Price: 23.70 USD
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13 GARRISON, PHILIP. Because I Don't Have Wings: Stories Of Mexican Immigrant Life.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2006. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
For Mexican workers, the agricultural valleys of the inland Northwest are a long way from home. But there they have established communities, settlements recent enough that it feels like these newly arrived immigrant mexicanos are pioneers, still getting used to the Anglos and to each other. This book looks at the inner lives of Mexican immigrants in a northwestern U.S. boomtown, a loose collection of families from Michoacan and surrounding states living a mere 150 miles from Canada. They are more isolated than most mexicano communities closer to home, and they endure severe winters that make life more difficult still. Neighborhoods form, dissolve, and re-form. Family members who leave may stay in touch, but friends very often simply vanish, leaving only their nicknames behind. Without a market or a plaza, residents meet at weddings, christenings, and funerals—or at the food bank. Philip Garrison has spent most of his life in this region and shares in vivid prose tales of immigrant life, both contemporary and historical, revealing the dual lives of first-generation Mexican immigrants who move smoothly between the Yakima Valley and their homes in Mexico. And with a scholar's eye he examines figures of speech that reflect mexicano feelings about immigrant life, offering glimpses of adaptation through offhand remarks, family spats, and town gossip. Written with irony but bursting with compassion, Because I Don't Have Wings features vivid characters, telling anecdotes, and poignant reflections on life, unfolding an immigrant's world strikingly different from the one we usually read about. Adaptation, persistence, and survival, we learn, are traits that mexicano culture values. We also learn that, over time, mexicano immigrants don't merely adapt to the culture of el norte, they transform it. "he weaves together the centuries-old history of the immigrants' origins in Michoacan, their cultural and religious customs, and their struggle to keep these traditions alive." —Booklist "A rich mass of imaginative impressions in subtly researched pieces, stylistically polished, candid, and authentic in perspective." —Tucson Weekly "This book is strong and bold . . . and undeniably strange. The details of lives played out in the shadows are surreal, sometimes haunting, often deeply moving. It's an eye-opener that all Americans should read." —Luis Urrea, author of Nobody's Son "No one has written with greater insight and honesty about Mexican immigration than Philip Garrison. In this important book, he locates the turbulent interface of Hispanic and mainstream American cultures, and dwells there, alert, observant, empathic." —John Witte, editor of Northwest Review 
Price: 16.10 USD
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14 GÓMEZ-QUIĄONES, JUAN & VÁSQUEZ, IRENE. Making Aztlan: Ideology And Culture Of The Chicana And Chicano Movement, 1966-1977.
University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque: 2014. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
This book provides a long-needed overview of the Chicana and Chicano movement's social history as it grew, flourished, and then slowly fragmented. The authors examine the movement's origins in the 1960s and 1970s, showing how it evolved from a variety of organizations and activities united in their quest for basic equities for Mexican Americans in U.S. society. Within this matrix of agendas, objectives, strategies, approaches, ideologies, and identities, numerous electrifying moments stitched together the struggle for civil and human rights. Gomez-QuiĖones and Vasquez show how these convergences underscored tensions among diverse individuals and organizations at every level. Their narrative offers an assessment of U.S. society and the Mexican American community at a critical time, offering a unique understanding of its civic progress toward a more equitable social order. Juan Gomez-QuiĖones is a professor of history at UCLA. His earlier books include Mexican American Labor, 1790-1990, Roots of Chicano Politics, 1600-1940, and Chicano Politics: Reality and Promise, 1940-1990, all published by the University of New Mexico Press. Irene Vasquez is the director of Chicana and Chicano Studies at the University of New Mexico. She is coauthor of Latino-Latino Americanos, 2000: Things Social Do Not Melt into the Air and coeditor of The Borders in All of Us: New Approaches to Global Diasporic Studies. 6 x 9 in., 496 pages 28 halftones. 
Price: 42.94 USD
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15 HERRERA-SOBEK, MARÍA & HELENA MARÍA VIRAMONTES (EDITORS). Chicana Creativity And Criticism: New Frontiers In American Literature.
University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque: 2017. Second Edition. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
This provocative combination of original poetry, prose, criticism, and visual art documents the continuing growth of literature by and about Chicanas. Through innovative use of language and images, the artists represented here explore female sexuality, economic and social injustice, gender roles, and the contributions of critical theory. Chicana Creativity and Criticism, first published in 1988, includes poetry by Lorna Dee Cervantes, Lucha Corpi, Evangelina Vigil-PiĖon, Denise Chavez, and Naomi QuiĖonez; prose by Alma E. Cervantes, Helena Maria Viramontes, Roberta Fernandez, and Sheila Ortiz Taylor; criticism by Tey Diana Rebolledo, Yvonne Yarbro-Bejarano, Norma Alarcon, and Maria Herrera-Sobek; and art by Carmen Lomas Garza, Yreina Cervantez, and Laura Aguilar. 6.125 x 9.25 in,. 304 pages, 11 halftones. Maria Herrera-Sobek, Professor of Chicano Studies, is the Luis Leal Endowed Chair at the University of California, Santa Barbara and the Associate Director of the Center for Chicano Studies. She is co-organizing the East/West Chicano Institute to be held at Cornell University in conjunction with UCSB's Center for Chicano Studies. A renowned literary critic, poet, and folklore specialist, Dr. Herrera Sobek has published numerous books, articles and scholarly essays. Her books include The Bracero Experience: Elite Lore versus Folklore, Northward Bound: The Mexican Immigrant Experience in Ballad and Song, and The Mexican Corrido: A Feminist Analysis. Helena Maria Viramontes is professor and Director of Creative Writing at Cornell University. ". . . an impressive collage that documents literature by and about Chicanas." -- American Literature "Through innovative use of language and images . . . This provocative combination of original poetry, prose, criticism, and visual art documents the continuing growth of literature by and about Chicanas." --Hispanic Outlook ". . . offers a genuine and symptomatic literary plenty . . . a stunning collage-canvas of a bound and exposed female upper torso set between the American and Mexican flags." -- The Year's Work 
Price: 26.55 USD
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16 HIGH, CASEY. Victims And Warriors: Violence, History, And Memory In Amazonia.
University of Illinois Press, Urbana and Chicago: 2015. h Hardcover as issued without dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Ancient ways and modern life among the Waorani of Ecuador In 1956, a group of Waorani men killed five North American missionaries in Ecuador. The event cemented the Waorani's reputation as "wild Amazonian Indians" in the eyes of the outside world. It also added to the myth of the violent Amazon created by colonial writers and still found in academia and the state development agendas across the region. Victims and Warriors examines contemporary violence in the context of political and economic processes that transcend local events. Casey High explores how popular imagery of Amazonian violence has become part of Waorani social memory in oral histories, folklore performances, and indigenous political activism. As Amazonian forms of social memory merge with constructions of masculinity and other intercultural processes, the Waorani absorb missionaries, oil development, and logging depredations into their legacy of revenge killings and narratives of victimhood. High shows that these memories of past violence form sites of negotiation and cultural innovation, and thus violence comes to constitute a central part of Amazonian sociality, identity, and memory. Casey High is a lecturer in social anthropology at the University of Edinburgh. He is coeditor of The Anthropology of Ignorance: An Ethnographic Approach. "What do Bruce Lee, American missionaries being speared to death, Amerindians dancing in a national pride day, urban warrior performances, and a deeply felt sense of victimhood possibly have in common? In a refined narrative, Casey High weaves together memories, facts and fantasies as these occur in contemporary Ecuadorian Amazonia, offering us a fascinating picture of Waorani life today. This highly original book takes us a step further in the understanding of current sociocultural transformations among Amazonian indigenous peoples."--Carlos Fausto, National Museum, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro "Insightful and terrifically readable. Victims and Warriors is a timely, innovative look at how Waorani use images of their violent past to craft new forms of masculinity and identity that remain remarkably resistant to gender hierarchy and sexual antagonism."--Beth Conklin, author of Consuming Grief: Compassionate Cannibalism in an Amazonian Society "Usually Waorani voices are distorted due to some other outside agenda, but here we have a nuanced account that communicates their experiences, remembrances, and perspective. Being able to hear what Waorani people think and say about violent encounters and violence in general, as well as Christianity, development, and other topics related to Waorani life and history, makes for a compelling read."--Michael A. Uzendoski, author of The Ecology of the Spoken Word: Amazonian Storytelling and Shamanism among the Napo Runa 
Price: 90.25 USD
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17 HIGH, CASEY. Victims And Warriors: Violence, History, And Memory In Amazonia.
University of Illinois Press, Urbana and Chicago: 2015. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Ancient ways and modern life among the Waorani of Ecuador In 1956, a group of Waorani men killed five North American missionaries in Ecuador. The event cemented the Waorani's reputation as "wild Amazonian Indians" in the eyes of the outside world. It also added to the myth of the violent Amazon created by colonial writers and still found in academia and the state development agendas across the region. Victims and Warriors examines contemporary violence in the context of political and economic processes that transcend local events. Casey High explores how popular imagery of Amazonian violence has become part of Waorani social memory in oral histories, folklore performances, and indigenous political activism. As Amazonian forms of social memory merge with constructions of masculinity and other intercultural processes, the Waorani absorb missionaries, oil development, and logging depredations into their legacy of revenge killings and narratives of victimhood. High shows that these memories of past violence form sites of negotiation and cultural innovation, and thus violence comes to constitute a central part of Amazonian sociality, identity, and memory. Casey High is a lecturer in social anthropology at the University of Edinburgh. He is coeditor of The Anthropology of Ignorance: An Ethnographic Approach. "What do Bruce Lee, American missionaries being speared to death, Amerindians dancing in a national pride day, urban warrior performances, and a deeply felt sense of victimhood possibly have in common? In a refined narrative, Casey High weaves together memories, facts and fantasies as these occur in contemporary Ecuadorian Amazonia, offering us a fascinating picture of Waorani life today. This highly original book takes us a step further in the understanding of current sociocultural transformations among Amazonian indigenous peoples."--Carlos Fausto, National Museum, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro "Insightful and terrifically readable. Victims and Warriors is a timely, innovative look at how Waorani use images of their violent past to craft new forms of masculinity and identity that remain remarkably resistant to gender hierarchy and sexual antagonism."--Beth Conklin, author of Consuming Grief: Compassionate Cannibalism in an Amazonian Society "Usually Waorani voices are distorted due to some other outside agenda, but here we have a nuanced account that communicates their experiences, remembrances, and perspective. Being able to hear what Waorani people think and say about violent encounters and violence in general, as well as Christianity, development, and other topics related to Waorani life and history, makes for a compelling read."--Michael A. Uzendoski, author of The Ecology of the Spoken Word: Amazonian Storytelling and Shamanism among the Napo Runa 
Price: 26.60 USD
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18 LACKIE, JOYCE. I Don't Cry, But I Remember: A Mexican Immigrant's Story Of Endurance.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2012. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
When Viviana Salguero came to the United States in 1946, she spoke very little English, had never learned to read or write, and had no job skills besides housework or field labor. She worked eighteen-hour days and lived outdoors as often as not. And yet she raised twelve children, shielding them from her abusive husband when she dared, and shared in both the tragedies and accomplishments of her family. Through it all, Viviana never lost her love for Mexico or her gratitude to the United States for what would eventually become a better life. Though her story is unique, Viviana Salguero could be the mother, grandmother, or great-grandmother of immigrants anywhere, struggling with barriers of gender, education, language, and poverty. In I Don't Cry, But I Remember, Joyce Lackie shares with us an intimate portrait of Viviana's life. Based on hours of recorded conversations, Lackie skillfully translates the interviews into an engaging, revealing narrative that details the migrant experience from a woman's point of view and fills a gap in our history by examining the role of women of color in the American Southwest. The book presents VivanaŐ†s life not only as a chronicle of endurance, but as a tale of everyday resistance. What she lacks in social confidence, political strength, and economic stability, she makes up for in dignity, faith, and wisdom. Like all good oral history, Salguero's accounts and Lackie's analyses contribute to our understanding of the past by exposing the inconsistencies and contradictions in our remembrances. This book will appeal to ethnographers, oral historians, students and scholars of Chicana studies and women's studies, as well as general readers interested in the lives of immigrant women. 
Price: 25.60 USD
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19 LAZO DE LA VEGA, SANDRA & STEIGENGA, TIMOTHY J. Against The Tide: Immigrants, Day Laborers, And Community In Jupiter, Florida.
The University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, Milwaukee and London: . s Softcover. Brand new book. 

Price: 25.60 USD
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20 LÓPEZ-CALVO, IGNACIO. Latino Los Angeles In Film And Fiction: The Cultural Production Of Social Anxiety.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2014. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Los Angeles has long been a place where cultures clash and reshape. The city has a growing number of Latina/o authors and filmmakers who are remapping and reclaiming it through ongoing symbolic appropriation. In this illuminating book, Ignacio Lopez-Calvo foregrounds the emotional experiences of authors, implicit authors, narrators, characters, and readers in order to demonstrate that the evolution of the imaging of Los Angeles in Latino cultural production is closely related to the politics of spatial location. This spatial-temporal approach, he writes, reveals significant social anxieties, repressed rage, and deep racial guilt. Latino Los Angeles in Film and Fiction sets out to reconfigure the scope of Latino literary and cultural studies. Integrating histories of different regions and nations, the book sets the interplay of unresolved contradictions in this particular metropolitan area. The novelists studied here stem from multiple areas, including the U.S. Southwest, Guatemala, and Chile. The study also incorporates non-Latino writers who have contributed to the Latino culture of the city. The first chapter examines Latino cultural production from an ecocritical perspective on urban interethnic relations. Chapter 2 concentrates on the representation of daily life in the barrio and the marginalization of Latino urban youth. The third chapter explores the space of women and how female characters expand their area of operations from the domestic space to the public space of both the barrio and the city. A much-needed contribution to the fields of urban theory, race critical theory, Chicana/o-Latina/o studies, and Los Angeles writing and film, Lopez-Calvo offers multiple theoretical perspectives—including urban theory, ecocriticism, ethnic studies, gender studies, and cultural studies—contextualized with notions of transnationalism and post-nationalism. "Latino Los Angeles in Film and Fiction places Chicano and Latino culture under an illuminating spotlight…Lopez-Calvo's book is a superb example of contemporary culturalwriting, avant-garde and challenging in its own right…terse, systematic, poignant."—David Lau, BOOM "For the many AATSP members who have already begun to include the Hispanic United States as a component in Bilingual and Multicultural Studies programs, or who wish to do so, Latino Los Angeles in Film and Fiction helps us expand our horizons by identifying key texts that graphically portray life and death in the largest urban concentration of Hispanic origin people in the United States."—Project Muse "Highly recommended."—Choice Reviews "A lively, accessible, and engaging survey of the Latina/o imaginary in Los Angeles fiction and film."—George Lipsitz, author of The Possessive Investment in Whiteness: How White People Profit from Identity Politics "A wonderful, at times revelatory, reconstruction of the debate about the meaning and future of Los Angeles."—Mike Davis, author of City of Quartz Latino Los Angeles in Film and Fiction 
Price: 30.88 USD
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