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READING.

READING.

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1 GLYNN, TOM. Reading Publics: New York City's Public Libraries, 1754-1911.
Fordham University Press, New York: 2014. Empire State Editions. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
On May 11, 1911, the New York Public Library opened its "marble palace for book lovers" on Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street. This was the city's first public library in the modern sense, a tax-supported, circulating collection free to every citizen. Since before the Revolution, however, New York's reading publics had access to a range of "public libraries" as the term was understood by contemporaries. In its most basic sense a public library in the eighteenth and most of the nineteenth centuries simply meant a shared collection of books that was available to the general public and promoted the public good. From the founding in 1754 of the New York Society Library up to 1911, public libraries took a variety of forms. Some of them were free, charitable institutions, while others required a membership or an annual subscription. Some, such as the Biblical Library of the American Bible Society, were highly specialized; others, like the Astor Library, developed extensive, inclusive collections. What all the public libraries of this period had in common, at least ostensibly, was the conviction that good books helped ensure a productive, virtuous, orderly republic—that good reading promoted the public good. Tom Glynn's vivid, deeply researched history of New York City's public libraries over the course of more than a century and a half illuminates how the public and private functions of reading changed over time and how shared collections of books could serve both public and private ends. Reading Publics examines how books and reading helped construct social identities and how print functioned within and across groups, including but not limited to socioeconomic classes. The author offers an accessible while scholarly exploration of how republican and liberal values, shifting understandings of "public" and "private," and the debate over fiction influenced the development and character of New York City's public libraries in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Reading Publics is an important contribution to the social and cultural history of New York City that firmly places the city's early public libraries within the history of reading and print culture in the United States. Tom Glynn is a librarian at Rutgers University, where he is the selector and liaison for British and American history, the history of science, American studies, and political science. "A deeply researched, well-written, and solid contribution to library history literature that will interest not only members of the library profession but also scholars and students of intellectual, cultural, social, urban, and print culture history whose own research has been heavily influenced by the rich collections Glynn discusses."—Wayne Wiegand, Professor of Library and Information Studies Emeritus, Florida State University. "A wonderful book. Thoroughly enjoyable." —Christine Pawley, University of Wisconsin-Madison 
Price: 23.75 USD
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2 GLYNN, TOM. Reading Publics: New York City's Public Libraries, 1754-1911.
Fordham University Press, New York: 2014. Empire State Editions. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
On May 11, 1911, the New York Public Library opened its "marble palace for book lovers" on Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street. This was the city's first public library in the modern sense, a tax-supported, circulating collection free to every citizen. Since before the Revolution, however, New York's reading publics had access to a range of "public libraries" as the term was understood by contemporaries. In its most basic sense a public library in the eighteenth and most of the nineteenth centuries simply meant a shared collection of books that was available to the general public and promoted the public good. From the founding in 1754 of the New York Society Library up to 1911, public libraries took a variety of forms. Some of them were free, charitable institutions, while others required a membership or an annual subscription. Some, such as the Biblical Library of the American Bible Society, were highly specialized; others, like the Astor Library, developed extensive, inclusive collections. What all the public libraries of this period had in common, at least ostensibly, was the conviction that good books helped ensure a productive, virtuous, orderly republic—that good reading promoted the public good. Tom Glynn's vivid, deeply researched history of New York City's public libraries over the course of more than a century and a half illuminates how the public and private functions of reading changed over time and how shared collections of books could serve both public and private ends. Reading Publics examines how books and reading helped construct social identities and how print functioned within and across groups, including but not limited to socioeconomic classes. The author offers an accessible while scholarly exploration of how republican and liberal values, shifting understandings of "public" and "private," and the debate over fiction influenced the development and character of New York City's public libraries in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Reading Publics is an important contribution to the social and cultural history of New York City that firmly places the city's early public libraries within the history of reading and print culture in the United States. Tom Glynn is a librarian at Rutgers University, where he is the selector and liaison for British and American history, the history of science, American studies, and political science. "A deeply researched, well-written, and solid contribution to library history literature that will interest not only members of the library profession but also scholars and students of intellectual, cultural, social, urban, and print culture history whose own research has been heavily influenced by the rich collections Glynn discusses."—Wayne Wiegand, Professor of Library and Information Studies Emeritus, Florida State University. "A wonderful book. Thoroughly enjoyable." —Christine Pawley, University of Wisconsin-Madison 
Price: 83.60 USD
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3 HALL, DONALD. To Read Literature: Fiction Poetry Drama.
Holt, Rinehart & Winston, New York: 1987. 0030062071 / 9780030062070 Second Edition. s Softcover. Good condition. 
Introduces the three principal types or genres of literature: fiction, poetry, and drama. Concentrates on how to read such literature. Includes an Index. 
Price: 7.55 USD
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4 MARTÍN-RODRÍGUEZ, MANUEL M. (EDITOR). With A Book In Their Hands: Chicano/a Readers And Readerships Across The Centuries.
University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque: 2017 s Softcover. Brand new book. 
First Place Winner of the 2015 International Latino Book Award for Best Latino Focused Nonfiction Book Literary history is a history of reading. What happens during the act of reading is the subject of the branch of literary scholarship known as reader-response theory. Does the text guide the reader? Does the reader operate independently of the text? Questions like these shape the approach of the essays in this book, edited by a scholar known for his groundbreaking work in using reader-response theory as a window into Chicana and Chicano literature. Manuel M. Martin-Rodriguez has overseen several research projects aimed at documenting Chicana and Chicano reading practices and experiences. Here he gathers diverse and passionate accounts of reading drawn from that research. For many, books served as refuges from the sorrows of a childhood marked by violence or parental abandonment. Several of the contributors here salute the roles of teachers in introducing poetry and stories into their lives. Manuel M. Martin-Rodriguez is a professor of literature and a founding faculty member of the School of Social Sciences, Humanities and Arts at the University of California, Merced. "Highly recommended." --Choice " With a Book in their Hands is a fine scholarly and literary contribution to Chicano/a and Chicano/a-related fields of study, further unveiling the richness and complexity of Mexican American (reading) history from the late sixteenth century to the present." -- SHARP News "Refreshingly inclusive and analytically rigorous. . . . ( With a Book in Their Hands) magnifies the too often neglected history of reading in the Chicano/a experience. This unique intellectual sensibility captures the importance of constructing an accessible literary history and canon that prioritizes identifying, fleshing out, and learning from the act of reading." --New Mexico Historical Review 
Price: 33.20 USD
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5 MARTÍN-RODRÍGUEZ, MANUEL M. (EDITOR). With A Book In Their Hands: Chicano/a Readers And Readerships Across The Centuries.
University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque: 2017 h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
First Place Winner of the 2015 International Latino Book Award for Best Latino Focused Nonfiction Book Literary history is a history of reading. What happens during the act of reading is the subject of the branch of literary scholarship known as reader-response theory. Does the text guide the reader? Does the reader operate independently of the text? Questions like these shape the approach of the essays in this book, edited by a scholar known for his groundbreaking work in using reader-response theory as a window into Chicana and Chicano literature. Manuel M. Martin-Rodriguez has overseen several research projects aimed at documenting Chicana and Chicano reading practices and experiences. Here he gathers diverse and passionate accounts of reading drawn from that research. For many, books served as refuges from the sorrows of a childhood marked by violence or parental abandonment. Several of the contributors here salute the roles of teachers in introducing poetry and stories into their lives. Manuel M. Martin-Rodriguez is a professor of literature and a founding faculty member of the School of Social Sciences, Humanities and Arts at the University of California, Merced. "Highly recommended." --Choice " With a Book in their Hands is a fine scholarly and literary contribution to Chicano/a and Chicano/a-related fields of study, further unveiling the richness and complexity of Mexican American (reading) history from the late sixteenth century to the present." -- SHARP News "Refreshingly inclusive and analytically rigorous. . . . ( With a Book in Their Hands) magnifies the too often neglected history of reading in the Chicano/a experience. This unique intellectual sensibility captures the importance of constructing an accessible literary history and canon that prioritizes identifying, fleshing out, and learning from the act of reading." --New Mexico Historical Review 
Price: 42.75 USD
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6 WILLIAMS, ABIGAIL. The Social Life Of Books: Reading Together In The Eighteenth-century Home.
Yale University Press, New Haven: 2017. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
A vivid exploration of the evolution of reading as an essential social and domestic activity during the eighteenth century. Two centuries before the advent of radio, television, and motion pictures, books were a cherished form of popular entertainment and an integral component of domestic social life. In this fascinating and vivid history, Abigail Williams explores the ways in which shared reading shaped the lives and literary culture of the time, offering new perspectives on how books have been used by their readers, and the part they have played in middle-class homes and families. Drawing on marginalia, letters and diaries, library catalogues, elocution manuals, subscription lists, and more, Williams offers fresh and fascinating insights into reading, performance, and the history of middle-class home life. Abigail Williams is Lord White Fellow and Professor of Eighteenth-Century Studies at St. Peter's College, University of Oxford. She is author of Poetry and the Creation of a Whig Literary Culture: 1680-1714 and the editor of Jonathan Swift's Journal to Stella. 368 pages, 6 1/8 x 9 1/4, 57 black-and-white illustrations. "This is a magnificent achievement. Williams approaches the history of reading from a wide purview, offering research into the price of books, on literacy, and on circulating libraries, book shops, book clubs and other forms of book sharing, including book theft. It makes a very compelling case for the cultures of sociable reading in eighteenth-century Britain."—Markman Ellis, Queen Mary University of London "This book confidently explores a fascinating topic. Its strength lies in its sheer wealth of examples, especially the many cases recovered from provincial archives that freshly illustrate the habits and eccentricities of eighteenth-century readers. This is a book that any reader with an interest in the eighteenth century will enjoy and value."—John Mullan, University College London "A comprehensive account, impressively documented and vividly illustrated, of the social history of reading, by an author whose own reading skills are matched by her brilliantly mastered erudition."—Claude Rawson, Maynard Mack Professor of English Emeritus, Yale University "The Social Life of Books is a magnificent, genuinely innovative achievement that will appeal not only to scholars of literature and book history, not only to historians, but to all lovers of books and reading."—Markman Ellis, Queen Mary University of London "A lively survey . . . Williams's book is welcome because her research and insights make us conscious of how we, today, use books."—John Sutherland, New York Times Book Review "Williams's charming pageant of anecdotes, as revealed in diaries, letters and marginalia, conjures a world strikingly different from our own but surprisingly similar in many ways, a time when reading was on the rise and whole worlds sprang up around it."—Washington Post "The prose is never less than clear and engaging, the scholarship is meticulous, and the material is both accessible to rank beginners and useful for old hands. This major work will change the way one thinks about reading, particularly in 18th-century Britain."—Choice "The inestimable value of Williams's book is that it offers us, beyond the shrewd and apt commentary, new things to understand and to feel among the sheer diversity and number of its eloquent lives."—Min Wild, TLS "This lively and original study, richly documented and happily free of jargon… has brought to life the story of how print worked on people in the past."—Toby Barnard, Dublin Review of Books "[A] charming study."—New Criterion 
Price: 38.00 USD
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