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UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION.

UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION.

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1 GIZZI, MICHAEL C. & R. CRAIG CURTIS The Fourth Amendment In Flux: The Roberts Court, Crime Control, And Digital Privacy.
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: 2016. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
When the Founders penned the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution, it was not difficult to identify the "persons, houses, papers, and effects" they meant to protect; nor was it hard to understand what "unreasonable searches and seizures" were. The Fourth Amendment was intended to stop the use of general warrants and writs of assistance and applied primarily to protect the home. Flash forward to a time of digital devices, automobiles, the war on drugs, and a Supreme Court dominated by several decades of the jurisprudence of crime control, and the legal meaning of everything from "effects" to "seizures" has dramatically changed. Michael C. Gizzi and R. Craig Curtis make sense of these changes in The Fourth Amendment in Flux. The book traces the development and application of search and seizure law and jurisprudence over time, with particular emphasis on decisions of the Roberts Court. Cell phones, GPS tracking devices, drones, wiretaps, the Patriot Act, constantly changing technology, and a political culture that emphasizes crime control create new challenges for Fourth Amendment interpretation and jurisprudence. This work exposes the tensions caused by attempts to apply pretechnological legal doctrine to modern problems of digital privacy. In their analysis of the Roberts Court's relevant decisions, Gizzi and Curtis document the different approaches to the law that have been applied by the justices since the Obama nominees took their seats on the court. Their account, combining law, political science, and history, provides insight into the courts small group dynamics, and traces changes regarding search and seizure law in the opinions of one of its longest serving members, Justice Antonin Scalia. At a time when issues of privacy are increasingly complicated by technological advances, this overview and analysis of Fourth Amendment law is especially welcome—an invaluable resource as we address the enduring question of how to balance freedom against security in the context of the challenges of the twenty-first century. Michael C. Gizzi is associate professor of criminal justice at Illinois State University. R. Craig Curtis is associate professor of political science at Bradley University. "An interesting and informative read."—Law Library Journal "A significant contribution to the literature on Fourth Amendment jurisprudence that is written clearly and concisely. It should be read by legal scholars and students, and anyone with an interest in how law enforcement interests collide with the privacy rights of citizens."—Craig Hemmens, Chair and Professor, Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Washington State University 
Price: 18.95 USD
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2 GIZZI, MICHAEL C. & R. CRAIG CURTIS The Fourth Amendment In Flux: The Roberts Court, Crime Control, And Digital Privacy.
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: 2016. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
When the Founders penned the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution, it was not difficult to identify the "persons, houses, papers, and effects" they meant to protect; nor was it hard to understand what "unreasonable searches and seizures" were. The Fourth Amendment was intended to stop the use of general warrants and writs of assistance and applied primarily to protect the home. Flash forward to a time of digital devices, automobiles, the war on drugs, and a Supreme Court dominated by several decades of the jurisprudence of crime control, and the legal meaning of everything from "effects" to "seizures" has dramatically changed. Michael C. Gizzi and R. Craig Curtis make sense of these changes in The Fourth Amendment in Flux. The book traces the development and application of search and seizure law and jurisprudence over time, with particular emphasis on decisions of the Roberts Court. Cell phones, GPS tracking devices, drones, wiretaps, the Patriot Act, constantly changing technology, and a political culture that emphasizes crime control create new challenges for Fourth Amendment interpretation and jurisprudence. This work exposes the tensions caused by attempts to apply pretechnological legal doctrine to modern problems of digital privacy. In their analysis of the Roberts Court's relevant decisions, Gizzi and Curtis document the different approaches to the law that have been applied by the justices since the Obama nominees took their seats on the court. Their account, combining law, political science, and history, provides insight into the courts small group dynamics, and traces changes regarding search and seizure law in the opinions of one of its longest serving members, Justice Antonin Scalia. At a time when issues of privacy are increasingly complicated by technological advances, this overview and analysis of Fourth Amendment law is especially welcome—an invaluable resource as we address the enduring question of how to balance freedom against security in the context of the challenges of the twenty-first century. Michael C. Gizzi is associate professor of criminal justice at Illinois State University. R. Craig Curtis is associate professor of political science at Bradley University. "An interesting and informative read."—Law Library Journal "A significant contribution to the literature on Fourth Amendment jurisprudence that is written clearly and concisely. It should be read by legal scholars and students, and anyone with an interest in how law enforcement interests collide with the privacy rights of citizens."—Craig Hemmens, Chair and Professor, Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Washington State University 
Price: 37.95 USD
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3 KYVIG, DAVID E. Explicit And Authentic Acts: Amending The U.s. Constitution 1776-2015, With A New Afterword.
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: 2016. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
In time for the 225th anniversary of the Bill of Rights, David Kyvig completed an Afterword to his landmark study of the process of amending the US Constitution. The Afterword discusses the many amendments, such those requiring a balanced federal budget or limiting the terms of members of Congress, that have been proposed since the book was originally published and why they failed of passage. At a time when prominent scholars and other public figures have called for a constitutional convention to write a new constitution, arguing that our current system of governance is unsustainable Kyvig reminds us of the high hurdles the founders created to amending the constitution and how they have served the country well, preventing the amendment process from being used by one faction to serve the passions of the moment. In his farewell address, President Washington reminded his audience that the Constitution, "till changed by an explicit and authentic act of the whole people, is sacredly obligatory upon all." He regarded the Constitution as a binding document worthy of devout allegiance, but also believed that it contains a clear and appropriate procedure for its own reform. David Kyvig's illuminating study provides the most complete and insightful history of that amendment process and its fundamental importance for American political life Over the course of the past two centuries, more than 10,000 amendments have been proposed by the method stipulated in Article V of the Constitution. Amazingly, only 33 have garnered the required two-thirds approval from both houses of Congress, and only 27 were ultimately ratified into law by the states. Despite their small number, those amendments have revolutionized American government while simultaneously legitimizing and preserving its continued existence. Indeed, they have dramatically altered the relationship between state and federal authority, as well as between government and private citizens. Kyvig reexamines the creation and operation of Article V, illuminating the process and substance of each major successful and failed effort to change the formal structure, duties, and limits of the federal government. He analyzes in detail the Founders' intentions; the periods of great amendment activity during the 1790s, 1860s, 1910s, and 1960s; and the considerable consequences of amendment failure involving slavery, alcohol prohibition, child labor, New Deal programs, school prayer, equal rights for women, abortion, balanced budgets, term limits, and flag desecration. About the Author David E. Kyvig was professor of history at the University of Akron. Henry Adams Prize, Bancroft Prize, Ohio History Association Book Prize. "Invaluable—not just for American constitutional historians but for the study of American history. And, if controversies over amending the Constitution continue to preoccupy the American people, Kyvig's splendid book should be at the focus of such debates."—Journal of American History "A magisterial overview." —The New Republic 
Price: 33.25 USD
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4 LEVINSON, SANFORD (EDITOR). Nullification And Secession In Modern Constitutional Thought,
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: 2016. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The Missouri legislature passes a bill to flout federal gun-control laws it deems unconstitutional. Texas refuses to recognize same-sex marriages, citing the state's sovereignty. The Tenth Amendment Center promotes the "Federal Health Care Nullification Act." In these and many other similar instances, the spirit of nullification is seeing a resurgence in an ever-more politically fragmented and decentralized America. What this means—in legal, cultural, and historical terms—is the question explored in Nullification and Secession in Modern Constitutional Thought. Bringing together a number of distinguished scholars, the book offers a variety of informed perspectives on what editor Sanford Levinson terms "neo-nullification," a category that extends from formal declarations on the invalidity of federal law to what might be called "uncooperative federalism." Mark Tushnet, Mark Graber, James Read, Jared Goldstein, Vicki Jackson, and Alison La Croix are among the contributors who consider a strain of federalism stretching from the framing of the Constitution to the state of Texas''s most recent threat to secede from the United States. The authors look at the theory and practice of nullification and secession here and abroad, discussing how contemporary advocates use the text and history of the Constitution to make their cases, and how very different texts and histories influence such movements outside of the United States—in Scotland, for instance, or Catalonia, or Quebec, or even England vis-ą-vis the European Union. Together these essays provide a nuanced account of the practical and philosophical implications of a concept that has marked America's troubled times, from the build-up to the Civil War to the struggle over civil rights to battles over the Second Amendment and Obamacare. Sanford Levinson is W. St. John Garwood and W. St. John Garwood, Jr. Centennial Chair in Law at the University of Texas School of Law and professor of government at the University of Texas at Austin. He is the author of many books, including Framed: America's 51 Constitutions and the Crisis of Governance. "This is a fascinating set of essays on the supposedly obsolete doctrine of nullification, and its political cousin, secession. Filled with historical and comparative insights, this book is essential reading for anyone interested in American federalism and federal systems generally."—Jack M. Balkin, Yale Law School "Sanford Levinson has assembled a probing set of contributions on a fascinating topic that is of immediate interest and has historical resonance. An outstanding group of scholars examines principled resistance to a constitutional order from many different angles, including useful comparative perspectives." —Stephen Griffin, author of Broken Trust: Dysfunctional Government and Constitutional Reform . 
Price: 23.70 USD
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5 LEVINSON, SANFORD (EDITOR). Nullification And Secession In Modern Constitutional Thought,
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: 2016. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
The Missouri legislature passes a bill to flout federal gun-control laws it deems unconstitutional. Texas refuses to recognize same-sex marriages, citing the state's sovereignty. The Tenth Amendment Center promotes the "Federal Health Care Nullification Act." In these and many other similar instances, the spirit of nullification is seeing a resurgence in an ever-more politically fragmented and decentralized America. What this means—in legal, cultural, and historical terms—is the question explored in Nullification and Secession in Modern Constitutional Thought. Bringing together a number of distinguished scholars, the book offers a variety of informed perspectives on what editor Sanford Levinson terms "neo-nullification," a category that extends from formal declarations on the invalidity of federal law to what might be called "uncooperative federalism." Mark Tushnet, Mark Graber, James Read, Jared Goldstein, Vicki Jackson, and Alison La Croix are among the contributors who consider a strain of federalism stretching from the framing of the Constitution to the state of Texas''s most recent threat to secede from the United States. The authors look at the theory and practice of nullification and secession here and abroad, discussing how contemporary advocates use the text and history of the Constitution to make their cases, and how very different texts and histories influence such movements outside of the United States—in Scotland, for instance, or Catalonia, or Quebec, or even England vis-ą-vis the European Union. Together these essays provide a nuanced account of the practical and philosophical implications of a concept that has marked America's troubled times, from the build-up to the Civil War to the struggle over civil rights to battles over the Second Amendment and Obamacare. Sanford Levinson is W. St. John Garwood and W. St. John Garwood, Jr. Centennial Chair in Law at the University of Texas School of Law and professor of government at the University of Texas at Austin. He is the author of many books, including Framed: America's 51 Constitutions and the Crisis of Governance. "This is a fascinating set of essays on the supposedly obsolete doctrine of nullification, and its political cousin, secession. Filled with historical and comparative insights, this book is essential reading for anyone interested in American federalism and federal systems generally."—Jack M. Balkin, Yale Law School "Sanford Levinson has assembled a probing set of contributions on a fascinating topic that is of immediate interest and has historical resonance. An outstanding group of scholars examines principled resistance to a constitutional order from many different angles, including useful comparative perspectives." —Stephen Griffin, author of Broken Trust: Dysfunctional Government and Constitutional Reform . 
Price: 42.75 USD
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