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NATIVE AMERICANS.

NATIVE AMERICANS.

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1 A Nation In Transition: Douglas Henry Johnston And The Chickasaws, 1898-1939.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2009. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Chronicles the political life of an important Chickasaw leader Douglas Henry Johnston was governor of the Chickasaw Nation from 1898 to 1902 and from 1904 to 1939. His tenure in this position is the longest of any American Indian chief executive. In this much-anticipated biography, Michael Lovegrove chronicles Johnston's remarkable political life, telling the story of how he led his people—with diplomacy and efficiency—through the devastating dissolution of tribal lands at the beginning of the twentieth century and through the contentious struggles in the three decades that followed. Drawing on a range of sources, Lovegrove shows the enormous impact Governor Johnston had on the development of the Chickasaw Nation. A mild-mannered, intellectually gifted statesman, he stood steadfast at the helm of his people, helping them navigate federal allotment during the Dawes Commission era at the turn of the century. In his capacity as the federally appointed Chickasaw governor after Oklahoma statehood in 1907, Johnston led the Chickasaw and Choctaw Treaty Rights Association, which successfully fought the State of Oklahoma's efforts to tax allotment lands. The governor and his colleagues vigorously challenged these taxation initiatives in federal court, arguing that they violated the Dawes Act of 1887, the Atoka Agreement of 1897, and the Curtis Act of 1898. Fortunately, Johnston lived and led his people long enough to see new hope emerge in the Indian New Deal of the 1930s. A valuable addition to the history of the Chickasaw Nation, this richly textured historical narrative reveals the tribulations and accomplishments of a great statesman. Dr. Michael Lovegrove, historian and native Oklahoman, received his BA, MA, and PhD from the University of Oklahoma. He is a member of several historical societies, including a life member of the Oklahoma Historical Society and a charter member of the Chickasaw Historical Society. He is the past President of the Friends of the Oklahoma Historical Society Archives and has served on the Friends Board of Directors for ten years. He is a professor of history at Rose State College in Midwest City where he teaches United States History to 1877 and since 1877; History of the American West; and Oklahoma History. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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2 Chickasaw Journeys Activity Book.
White Dog Press, Ada: 2014. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Designed for children ages five to twelve, the Chickasaw Journeys Activity Book uses a variety of engaging activities to introduce Chickasaw history, language, and culture. Some activities can be completed from home, while others require children to visit historical and cultural sites within the Chickasaw Nation. Children have the opportunity to earn trade beads during their on-site visits and are granted membership to the Ofi' Tohbi Club, which includes a club patch and coin, upon completion of the book. 
Price: 14.20 USD
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3 Creating Christian Indians: Native Clergy In The Presbyterian Church. Bonnie Sue Lewis Anthropology / Archaeology / Ethnohistory , American Indian
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2003. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Histories of missions to American Indian communities usually tell a sad and predictable story about the destructive impact of missionary work on Native culture and religion. Many historians conclude that American Indian tribes who have maintained a cultural identity have done so only because missionaries were unable to destroy it. In Creating Christian Indians, Bonnie Sue Lewis relates how the Nez Perce and the Dakota Indians became Presbyterians yet incorporated Native culture and tradition into their new Christian identities. Lewis focuses on the rise of Native clergy and their forging of Christian communities based on American Indian values and notions of kinship and leadership. Originally, mission work among the Nez Perces and Dakotas revolved around white missionaries, but Christianity truly took root in nineteenth-century American Indian communities with the ordination of Indian clergy. Native pastors saw in Christianity a universal message of hope and empowerment. Educated and trained within their own communities, Native ministers were able to preach in their own languages. They often acted as cultural brokers between Indian and white societies, shaping Native Presbyterianism and becoming recognized leaders in both tribal and Presbyterian circles. In 1865 the Presbyterian Church ordained John B. Renville as the first Dakota Indian minister, and in 1879 Robert Williams became the first ordained Nez Perce. By 1930, nearly forty Dakotas, sixteen Nez Perces, a Spokane, and a Makah had been ordained. Lewis has mined church and archival records, including letters from Native ministers, to reveal ways in which early Indian pastors left a heritage of committed Presbyterian congregations and a vibrant spiritual legacy among their descendants. Bonnie Sue Lewis is Assistant Professor of Mission and Native American Christianity at the University of Dubuque Theological Seminary in Iowa. Bonnie Sue Lewis is Assistant Professor of Mission and Native American Christianity at the University of Dubuque Theological Seminary in Iowa. 
Price: 33.44 USD
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4 Death Dances: Two Novellas On North American Indians.
Apple-wood Press, Cambridge 1979. 0918222087 / 9780918222084 First Edition (Unstated). s Softcover. Reading copy. 

Price: 15.20 USD
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5 Reasoning Together: The Native Critics Collective.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2008. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
A paradigm shift in American Indian literary criticism. This collectively authored volume celebrates a group of Native critics performing community in a lively, rigorous, sometimes contentious dialogue that challenges the aesthetics of individual literary representation. Janice Acoose infuses a Cree reading of Canadian Cree literature with a creative turn to Cree language; Lisa Brooks looks at eighteenth- and early-nineteenth-century Native writers and discovers little-known networks among them; Tol Foster argues for a regional approach to Native studies that can include unlikely subjects such as Will Rogers; LeAnne Howe creates a fictional character, Embarrassed Grief, whose problematic authenticity opens up literary debates; Daniel Heath Justice takes on two prominent critics who see mixed-blood identities differently than he does in relation to kinship; Phillip Carroll Morgan uncovers written Choctaw literary criticism from the 1830s on the subject of oral performance; Kimberly Roppolo advocates an intertribal rhetoric that can form a linguistic foundation for criticism. Cheryl Suzack situates feminist theories within Native culture with an eye to applying them to subjugated groups across Indian Country; Christopher B. Teuton organizes Native literary criticism into three modes based on community awareness; Sean Teuton opens up new sites for literary performance inside prisons with Native inmates; Robert Warrior wants literary analysis to consider the challenges of eroticism; Craig S. Womack introduces the book by historicizing book-length Native-authored criticism published between 1986 and 1997, and he concludes the volume with an essay on theorizing experience. Reasoning Together proposes nothing less than a paradigm shift in American Indian literary criticism, closing the gap between theory and activism by situating Native literature in real-life experiences and tribal histories. It is an accessible collection that will suit a wide range of courses—and will educate and energize anyone engaged in criticism of Native literature. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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6 The Gift Of The Sacred Pipe.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 1995. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
This book is an illustrated edition of Black Elk's account of the seven sacred rites of the Oglala Sioux. Vividly portraying the arrival of the White Buffalo Woman on the Plains, the paintings and charcoals by Vera Louise Drysdale highlight dramatic elements of the ancient rituals she imparted, and they show everyday objects that were sanctified in the Sioux cosmology. The sacred pipe is the central instrument in the holy rites of the Sioux people. The White Buffalo Woman appeared on the Plains to give the pipe to the Sioux so that they might "send their voices" to Wakan-Tanka, the Great Spirit. She related the seven rites of the pipe: the keeping of the soul, the rite of purification, crying for a vision, the Sun Dance, the making of relatives, preparation for womanhood, and the throwing of the ball that symbolizes the earth and gives strength to future generations. In this volume the rituals are condensed, but the continuity of Joseph Epes Brown's text is preserved. The original text, as given by Black Elk, was recorded in 1947; in 1953 the University of Oklahoma Press published it as The Sacred Pipe. Joseph Epes Brown (1920-2000) was an American scholar whose lifelong dedication to Native American traditions helped bring the study of American Indian religious traditions into higher education. His book, The Sacred Pipe, is an account of his discussions with the Lakota holy man, Black Elk. "I traveled among many of the prairie Indians," Brown said, "and after meeting the old Sioux priest Black Elk, I was asked by him to record the account he should give me of his ancient religion. This volume I really consider to be his work and his contribution to the Sioux." Vera Louise Drysdale, a professional artist and illustrator with numerous Indian portraits to her credit, worked for five years on the illustrations for The Gift of the Sacred Pipe. "Merely contemplating these mystical paintings moves the reader to a deeper understanding than is possible through words alone. Nevertheless, the accompanying description of rituals is authentic, direct, and convincing."—Southwestern Lore. "Your paintings are a delight to the eyes and heart, and your profound respect for the holiness of the White Buffalo Calf Woman, and for the Sacred Pipe she brought, clearly shines forth from those paintings." -Father Peter J. Powell, author of Sweet Medicine and People of the Sacred Mountain. "Done in spherical form, perhaps implying the universal outlook of the Sioux, these illustrations add visual dimension to the rich wording of Black Elk's account. Now readers will be better able to see the meaning of these rituals." - Journal of the West. 
Price: 18.95 USD
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7 ABBOTT, RAYMOND H. That Day In Gordon.
The Vanguard Press, New York: 1986. 0814909248 / 9780814909249 First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Library discard. Good condition. 
Deeply felt novel about the destiny of Black Horse, a Native American living on a South Dakota reservation. 
Price: 10.07 USD
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8 ACKERMAN, LILLIAN A. & KLEIN, LAURA F. (EDITORS). Women And Power In Native North America.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2000. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Since the colonization of indigenous peoples in North America, the roles of Native women within their societies have been concealed or, at best, misunderstood. By examining gender status, and particularly power, in ten culture areas, this volume, edited by Laura F. Klein and Lillian A. Ackerman, seeks to draw away the curtain of silence surrounding the lives of Native North American women. Power is understood to be manifested in a multiplicity of ways: through cosmology, economic control, and formal hierarchy. In the Native societies examined, power is continually created and redefined through individual life stages and through the history of the society. The important issue is autonomy-whether, or to what extent, individuals are autonomous in living their lives. Each author demonstrates that women in a particular cultural area of aboriginal North America had (and have) more power than many previous observers have claimed. In this volume: "Introduction," Laura F. Klein and Lillian A. Ackerman; "Gender in Inuit Society," Lee Guemple; "Mother as Clanswoman: Rank and Gender in Tlingit Society," Laura F. Klein; ''Asymmetric Equals: Women and Men Among the Chipewyan," Henry S. Sharp; "Complementary but Equal: Gender Status in the Plateau," Lillian A. Ackerman; "First Among Equals? The Changing Status of Seneca Women," Joy Bilharz; "Blackfoot Persons," Alice B. Kehoe; "Evolving Gender Roles in Porno Society," Victoria D. Patterson; "The Dynamics of Southern Paiute Women's Roles," Martha C. Knack; "The Gender Status of Navajo Women," Mary Shepardson; "Continuity and Change in Gender Roles at San Juan Pueblo," Sue-Ellen Jacobs; "Women's Status Among the Muskogee and Cherokee," Richard A. Sattler; "Gender and Power in Native North America: Concluding Remarks," Daniel Maltz and JoAllyn Archambault. Lillian A. Ackerman is a research anthropologist and Adjunct Associate Professor of Anthropology at Washington State University. Both have published extensively in Native American anthropology, focusing on women's roles. Laura F. Klein is Professor of Anthropology, Pacific Lutheran University. 
Price: 19.19 USD
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9 ACKERMAN, LILLIAN A. & KLEIN, LAURA F. (EDITORS). Women And Power In Native North America.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2000. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Since the colonization of indigenous peoples in North America, the roles of Native women within their societies have been concealed or, at best, misunderstood. By examining gender status, and particularly power, in ten culture areas, this volume, edited by Laura F. Klein and Lillian A. Ackerman, seeks to draw away the curtain of silence surrounding the lives of Native North American women. Power is understood to be manifested in a multiplicity of ways: through cosmology, economic control, and formal hierarchy. In the Native societies examined, power is continually created and redefined through individual life stages and through the history of the society. The important issue is autonomy-whether, or to what extent, individuals are autonomous in living their lives. Each author demonstrates that women in a particular cultural area of aboriginal North America had (and have) more power than many previous observers have claimed. In this volume: "Introduction," Laura F. Klein and Lillian A. Ackerman; "Gender in Inuit Society," Lee Guemple; "Mother as Clanswoman: Rank and Gender in Tlingit Society," Laura F. Klein; ''Asymmetric Equals: Women and Men Among the Chipewyan," Henry S. Sharp; "Complementary but Equal: Gender Status in the Plateau," Lillian A. Ackerman; "First Among Equals? The Changing Status of Seneca Women," Joy Bilharz; "Blackfoot Persons," Alice B. Kehoe; "Evolving Gender Roles in Porno Society," Victoria D. Patterson; "The Dynamics of Southern Paiute Women's Roles," Martha C. Knack; "The Gender Status of Navajo Women," Mary Shepardson; "Continuity and Change in Gender Roles at San Juan Pueblo," Sue-Ellen Jacobs; "Women's Status Among the Muskogee and Cherokee," Richard A. Sattler; "Gender and Power in Native North America: Concluding Remarks," Daniel Maltz and JoAllyn Archambault. Lillian A. Ackerman is a research anthropologist and Adjunct Associate Professor of Anthropology at Washington State University. Both have published extensively in Native American anthropology, focusing on women's roles. Laura F. Klein is Professor of Anthropology, Pacific Lutheran University. 
Price: 18.95 USD
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10 ADAIR, JOHN. The Navajo And Pueblo Silversmiths.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 1989. Volume 25 in Civilization of the American Indian Series. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Probably no Native American handicrafts are more widely admired than Navajo weaving and Navajo and Pueblo silver work. This book, which is now in its third large printing, contains the most important and complete account of Indian jewelry fashioned by the Navajo, the Zuni, the Hopi, and other Pueblo peoples. "With the care of a meticulous and thorough scholar, the author has told the story of his several years' investigation of jewelry making among the Southwestern Indians," says The Dallas Times Herald. "So richly decorative are the plates he uses ... that the conscientious narrative is surrounded by an atmosphere of genuinely exciting visual experience." John Adair is a trained ethnologist who has lived and worked among these Indians. To prepare his book, Mr. Adair made an exhaustive examination of the principal museum collections of Navajo and Pueblo silver work, both early and modem, in Santa Fe, Colorado Springs, Chicago, New York, and Philadelphia. He visited trading posts in the Indian country and examined and photographed silver on the pawn racks and in important private collections. He lived for a time among the Navajo, watched them make their jewelry, and actually learned to work silver himself in the hogan of one of the leading artisans, Tom Burnsides. Many of the photographs he made at the time are used as illustrations in this book. He spent months among the Indians in New Mexico and Arizona and became personally acquainted with many of their silversmiths. Later, as field worker for the Indian Arts and Crafts Board, he studied the economics of Navajo and Pueblo silversmithing; and still later he became manager of the Navajo Arts and Crafts Guild, a tribal enterprise. The Navajo and Pueblo Silversmiths provides a full history of the craft and the actual names and localities of the pioneer craftsmen who introduced the art of the silversmith to their people. Despite its present high stage of development, with its many subtle and often exquisite designs, the art of working silver is not an ancient one among the Navajo and Pueblo Indians. There are men still living today who remember the very first silversmiths. Mr. Adair gives full details, as he observed them, of the methods and techniques of manufacture over a primitive forge with homemade tools. He tells both of the fine pieces made for trade among the Indians themselves and of the newer, cheaper types of jewelry produced for sale to tourists. He discusses standards and qualities of Indian silver and describes the work of the Indian schools in helping preserve traditional design in the fine silver of today. His excellent photographs of some of the most notable pieces, old and new, provide examples for evaluation. This volume, therefore, will serve the layman, the ethnologist, and the dealer alike as a guide to proper values in Indian silver jewelry, and will provide the basis for authoritative knowledge and appreciation of a highly skilled creative art. 28 black and white Illustrations, 262 pages, 5.5" x 8". John Adair, (1913-1997) was a founder of the Navajo Arts and Crafts Guild and the chief anthropologist on the staff of the Cornell Navajo Field Health Project. Adair received a bachelor's degree from the University of Wisconsin in 1937 and a doctorate from the University of New Mexico, where he studied from 1946 to 1948. He taught anthropology at Cornell early in his career and at San Francisco State University from 1964 to 1978. "With the care of a meticulous and thorough scholar, the author has told the story of his several years' investigation of jewelry making among the Southwestern Indians. So richly decorative are the plates he uses for his numerous illustrations showing the jewelry itself, that the conscientious narrative is surrounded by an atmosphere of genuinely exciting visual experience."-Dallas Morning News. "The wealth of detail, the exact documentation, and the excellent tables, charts and plates make The Navajo and Pueblo Silversmiths a book of exceptional worth."-American Sociological Review. "The analysis of the economic aspects of the craft is painstaking and well carried out. Reading between the lines one must inevitable envisage the long weary hours spent in traveling to the isolated hogans and trading posts in quest of these data. This is no armchair compilation, but one that carries with it the tang of juniper wood burning in winter hogans, of the wet earth after a sturdy 'he' rain and the odor of coffee and mutton cooking over open fires. It is a labor of love plus a lot of sweat."-New York Herald Tribune. "The most interesting thing about Navajo and Pueblo silver," he says, "is not the aesthetic object separated from its social setting and viewed abstractly in a museum case, nor yet the making of this object, but the sociological significance of the art form in Navajo and Pueblo culture. This whole aspect of the craft has hitherto been neglected, as it has been in the studies made of the arts of many other primitive peoples." For the first time in anthropological history, Mr. Adair presents the development of the Pueblo silversmiths and includes a roster of native Indian smiths which will delight the hearts of all collectors of silver. -New York Herald Tribune. 
Price: 18.95 USD
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11 AHTONE, HEATHER & BAHTI, MARK T. (EDITORS). Hopituy.
Fred Jones, Jr. Museum of Art, Norman: 2015. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
For the Hopi people of the southwestern United States, katsinam are spiritual beings that guide cultural practices devoted to the search for balance with the people's earthly existence. The physical representations of the katsinam have become an integral part of the Southwest's artistic signature, with as many as 300 distinct spirits identified in the Hopi pantheon. Hopituy examines six katsina figure types as depicted across 170 objects from the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art permanent collections in diverse media, including woodcarving, painting, basketry, and ceramics. This publication explores how Hopi artists express the relationship between traditional protocol, cultural beliefs, and artistic license. The essays provide a helpful introduction to the artistic diversity that expresses the culture and beliefs of the Hopi people and a narrative context for the full-color images of selected works from the 2013 exhibition. Works for the publication were drawn from the FJJMA's permanent collections, including those given by James T. Bialac, University of Oklahoma President and Mrs. David L. Boren, Richard H. and Adeline J. Fleischaker, Dr. and Mrs. R. E. Mansfield, Tom F. Meaders, and Rennard Strickland, as well as the Eugene B. Adkins Collection, which is jointly stewarded with the Philbrook Museum of Art in Tulsa. 89 color and 1 black and white Illustrations, 96 pages, 9" x 12". 
Price: 15.15 USD
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12 ALI, SALEEM H. Mining The Environment And Indigenous Development Conflicts.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
From sun-baked Black Mesa to the icy coast of Labrador, native lands for decades have endured mining ventures that have only lately been subject to environmental lwa and treaty rights. This book gets to the heart of resource conflicts and environmental impact assessment by asking why indigenous communities support environmental causes in some cases of mining development but not in others. Saleem Ali examines environmental conflicts between mining companies and indigenous communities and with rare objectivity offers a comparative study of the factors leading to those conflicts. Mining, the Environment, and Indigenous Development Conflicts presents four cases from the United States and Canada: the Navajos and Hopis with Peabody Coal in Arizona; the Chippewas with the Crandon Mine proposal in Wisconsin; the Chipewyan Inuits, Déné and Cree with Cameco in Saskatchewan; and the Innu and Inuits with Inco in Labrador. These cases exemplify different historical relationships with government and industry and provide an instance of high and low levels of Native resistance in each country. Through these cases, Ali analyzes why and under what circumstances tribes agree to negotiated mining agreements on their lands, and why some negotiations are successful and others not. Ali challenges conventional theories of conflict based on economic or environmental cost-benefit analysis, which do not fully capture the dynamics of resistance. He proposes that the underlying issue has less to do with environmental concerns than with sovereignty, which often complicates relationships between tribes and environmental organizations. Activist groups, he observes, fail to understand such tribal concerns and often have problems working with tribes on issues where they may presume a common environmental interest. This book goes beyond popular perceptions of environmentalism to provide a detailed picture of how and when the concerns of industry, society, and tribal governments may converge and when they conflict. As demands for domestic energy exploration increase, it offers clear guidance for such endeavors when native lands are involved. 
Price: 31.30 USD
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13 ALLEN, PAULA GUNN. Grandmothers Of The Light: A Medicine Woman's Sourcebook.
Beacon Press, Boston: 1991. 0807081027 / 9780807081020 h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 

Price: 11.16 USD
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14 ANDERSON, GARY CLAYTON. Ethnic Cleansing And The Indian: The Crime That Should Haunt America.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2014. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
How Anglo-American settlers and their governments committed crimes against Native Americans—but not genocide. Mention "ethnic cleansing" and most Americans are likely to think of "sectarian" or "tribal" conflict in some far-off locale plagued by unstable or corrupt government. According to historian Gary Clayton Anderson, however, the United States has its own legacy of ethnic cleansing, and it involves American Indians. In Ethnic Cleansing and the Indian, Anderson uses ethnic cleansing as an analytical tool to challenge the alluring idea that Anglo-American colonialism in the New World constituted genocide. Beginning with the era of European conquest, Anderson employs definitions of ethnic cleansing developed by the United Nations and the International Criminal Court to reassess key moments in the Anglo-American dispossession of American Indians. Euro-Americans' extensive use of violence against Native peoples is well documented. Yet Anderson argues that the inevitable goal of colonialism and U.S. Indian policy was not to exterminate a population, but to obtain land and resources from the Native peoples recognized as having legitimate possession. The clashes between Indians, settlers, and colonial and U.S. governments, and subsequent dispossession and forcible migration of Natives, fit the modern definition of ethnic cleansing. To support the case for ethnic cleansing over genocide, Anderson begins with English conquerors' desire to push Native peoples to the margin of settlement, a violent project restrained by the Enlightenment belief that all humans possess a "natural right" to life. Ethnic cleansing comes into greater analytical focus as Anderson engages every major period of British and U.S. Indian policy, especially armed conflict on the American frontier where government soldiers and citizen militias alike committed acts that would be considered war crimes today. Drawing on a lifetime of research and thought about U.S.-Indian relations, Anderson analyzes the Jacksonian "Removal" policy, the gold rush in California, the dispossession of Oregon Natives, boarding schools and other "benevolent" forms of ethnic cleansing, and land allotment. Although not amounting to genocide, ethnic cleansing nevertheless encompassed a host of actions that would be deemed criminal today, all of which had long-lasting consequences for Native peoples. Gary Clayton Anderson, Professor of History at the University of Oklahoma, is author of The Conquest of Texas: Ethnic Cleansing in the Promised Land, 1820-1875. The Indian Southwest, 1580-1830 won the publication award from the San Antonio Conservation Society. ."Gary Clayton Anderson has uttered the words that most American historians have, for a variety of reasons, been unwilling to use. In evaluating American Indian policy as an early example of ethnic cleansing, he has launched an important debate. More than just a rephrasing of existing historical narratives, Ethnic Cleansing and the Indian contains important new research."—Richard White, author of The Middle Ground: Indians, Empires, and Republics in the Great Lakes Region, 1650-1815 
Price: 28.93 USD
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15 ANDERSON, GARY CLAYTON. Ethnic Cleansing And The Indian: The Crime That Should Haunt America.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2014. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
How Anglo-American settlers and their governments committed crimes against Native Americans—but not genocide. Mention "ethnic cleansing" and most Americans are likely to think of "sectarian" or "tribal" conflict in some far-off locale plagued by unstable or corrupt government. According to historian Gary Clayton Anderson, however, the United States has its own legacy of ethnic cleansing, and it involves American Indians. In Ethnic Cleansing and the Indian, Anderson uses ethnic cleansing as an analytical tool to challenge the alluring idea that Anglo-American colonialism in the New World constituted genocide. Beginning with the era of European conquest, Anderson employs definitions of ethnic cleansing developed by the United Nations and the International Criminal Court to reassess key moments in the Anglo-American dispossession of American Indians. Euro-Americans' extensive use of violence against Native peoples is well documented. Yet Anderson argues that the inevitable goal of colonialism and U.S. Indian policy was not to exterminate a population, but to obtain land and resources from the Native peoples recognized as having legitimate possession. The clashes between Indians, settlers, and colonial and U.S. governments, and subsequent dispossession and forcible migration of Natives, fit the modern definition of ethnic cleansing. To support the case for ethnic cleansing over genocide, Anderson begins with English conquerors' desire to push Native peoples to the margin of settlement, a violent project restrained by the Enlightenment belief that all humans possess a "natural right" to life. Ethnic cleansing comes into greater analytical focus as Anderson engages every major period of British and U.S. Indian policy, especially armed conflict on the American frontier where government soldiers and citizen militias alike committed acts that would be considered war crimes today. Drawing on a lifetime of research and thought about U.S.-Indian relations, Anderson analyzes the Jacksonian "Removal" policy, the gold rush in California, the dispossession of Oregon Natives, boarding schools and other "benevolent" forms of ethnic cleansing, and land allotment. Although not amounting to genocide, ethnic cleansing nevertheless encompassed a host of actions that would be deemed criminal today, all of which had long-lasting consequences for Native peoples. Gary Clayton Anderson, Professor of History at the University of Oklahoma, is author of The Conquest of Texas: Ethnic Cleansing in the Promised Land, 1820-1875. The Indian Southwest, 1580-1830 won the publication award from the San Antonio Conservation Society. ."Gary Clayton Anderson has uttered the words that most American historians have, for a variety of reasons, been unwilling to use. In evaluating American Indian policy as an early example of ethnic cleansing, he has launched an important debate. More than just a rephrasing of existing historical narratives, Ethnic Cleansing and the Indian contains important new research."—Richard White, author of The Middle Ground: Indians, Empires, and Republics in the Great Lakes Region, 1650-1815 
Price: 18.95 USD
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16 ANDERSON, GARY CLAYTON. The Indian Southwest, 1580-1830: Ethnogenesis And Reinvention.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2009. Volume 232 in the Civilization of the American Indian Series. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
How southwestern Indian peoples adapted to European conquest. The Indian Southwest, 1580-1830 demonstrates that, in the face of European conquest, severe drought, and disease, Indians in the Southwest proved remarkably adaptable and dynamic, remaining independent actors and even prospering. Some tribes temporarily joined Spanish missions or assimilated into other tribes. Others survived by remaining on the fringe of Spanish settlement, migrating, and expanding exchange relationships with other tribes. Still others incorporated remnant bands and individuals and strengthened their economic systems. The vibrancy of southwestern Indian societies today is due in part to the exchange-based political economies their ancestors created almost three centuries ago. Gary Clayton Anderson, Professor of History at the University of Oklahoma, is author of The Conquest of Texas: Ethnic Cleansing in the Promised Land, 1820-1875. The Indian Southwest, 1580-1830 won the publication award from the San Antonio Conservation Society. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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17 ANDERSON, JEFFREY D. Arapaho Women's Quillwork: Motion, Life, And Creativity.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2013. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The first comprehensive examination of this distinctly female art form More than a hundred years ago, anthropologists and other researchers collected and studied hundreds of examples of quillwork once created by Arapaho women. Since that time, however, other types of Plains Indian art, such as beadwork and male art forms, have received greater attention. In Arapaho Women's Quillwork, Jeffrey D. Anderson brings this distinctly female art form out of the darkness and into its rightful spotlight within the realms of both art history and anthropology. Beautifully illustrated with more than 50 color and black-and-white images, this book is the first comprehensive examination of quillwork within Arapaho ritualized traditions. Until the early twentieth century and the disruption of removal, porcupine quillwork was practiced by many indigenous cultures throughout North America. For Arapahos, quillwork played a central role in religious life within their most ancient and sacred traditions. Quillwork was manifest in all life transitions and appeared on paraphernalia for almost all Arapaho ceremonies. Its designs and the meanings they carried were present on many objects used in everyday life, such as cradles, robes, leanback covers, moccasins, pillows, and tipi ornaments, liners, and doors. Anderson demonstrates how, through the action of creating quillwork, Arapaho women became central participants in ritual life, often studied as the exclusive domain of men. He also shows how quillwork challenges predominant Western concepts of art and creativity: adhering to sacred patterns passed down through generations of women, it emphasized not individual creativity, but meticulous repetition and social connectivity—an approach foreign to many outside observers. Drawing on the foundational writings of early-nineteenth-century ethnographers, extensive fieldwork conducted with Northern Arapahos, and careful analysis of museum collections, Arapaho Women's Quillwork masterfully shows the importance of this unique art form to Arapaho life and honors the devotion of the artists who maintained this tradition for so many generations. Jeffrey D. Anderson is Professor of Anthropology at Hobart and William Smith Colleges. He is the author of One Hundred Years of Old Man Sage: An Arapaho Life Story and The Four Hills of Life: Northern Arapaho Knowledge and Life Movement. 
Price: 20.85 USD
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18 ANDERSON, JEFFREY D. Arapaho Women's Quillwork: Motion, Life, And Creativity.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2013. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
The first comprehensive examination of this distinctly female art form More than a hundred years ago, anthropologists and other researchers collected and studied hundreds of examples of quillwork once created by Arapaho women. Since that time, however, other types of Plains Indian art, such as beadwork and male art forms, have received greater attention. In Arapaho Women's Quillwork, Jeffrey D. Anderson brings this distinctly female art form out of the darkness and into its rightful spotlight within the realms of both art history and anthropology. Beautifully illustrated with more than 50 color and black-and-white images, this book is the first comprehensive examination of quillwork within Arapaho ritualized traditions. Until the early twentieth century and the disruption of removal, porcupine quillwork was practiced by many indigenous cultures throughout North America. For Arapahos, quillwork played a central role in religious life within their most ancient and sacred traditions. Quillwork was manifest in all life transitions and appeared on paraphernalia for almost all Arapaho ceremonies. Its designs and the meanings they carried were present on many objects used in everyday life, such as cradles, robes, leanback covers, moccasins, pillows, and tipi ornaments, liners, and doors. Anderson demonstrates how, through the action of creating quillwork, Arapaho women became central participants in ritual life, often studied as the exclusive domain of men. He also shows how quillwork challenges predominant Western concepts of art and creativity: adhering to sacred patterns passed down through generations of women, it emphasized not individual creativity, but meticulous repetition and social connectivity—an approach foreign to many outside observers. Drawing on the foundational writings of early-nineteenth-century ethnographers, extensive fieldwork conducted with Northern Arapahos, and careful analysis of museum collections, Arapaho Women's Quillwork masterfully shows the importance of this unique art form to Arapaho life and honors the devotion of the artists who maintained this tradition for so many generations. Jeffrey D. Anderson is Professor of Anthropology at Hobart and William Smith Colleges. He is the author of One Hundred Years of Old Man Sage: An Arapaho Life Story and The Four Hills of Life: Northern Arapaho Knowledge and Life Movement. 
Price: 37.95 USD
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19 ANDERSSON, RANI-HENRIK. The Lakota Ghost Dance Of 1890.
University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln and London: 2008. First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
A broad range of perspectives from Natives and non-Natives makes this book the most complete account and analysis of the Lakota ghost dance ever published. A revitalization movement that swept across Native communities of the West in the late 1880s, the ghost dance took firm hold among the Lakotas, perplexed and alarmed government agents, sparked the intervention of the U.S. Army, and culminated in the massacre of hundreds of Lakota men, women, and children at Wounded Knee in December 1890. Although the Lakota ghost dance has been the subject of much previous historical study, the views of Lakota participants have not been fully explored, in part because they have been available only in the Lakota language. Moreover, emphasis has been placed on the event as a shared historical incident rather than as a dynamic meeting ground of multiple groups with differing perspectives. In The Lakota Ghost Dance of 1890, Rani-Henrik Andersson uses for the first time some accounts translated from Lakota. This book presents these Indian accounts together with the views and observations of Indian agents, the U.S. Army, missionaries, the mainstream press, and Congress. This comprehensive, complex, and compelling study not only collects these diverse viewpoints but also explores and analyzes the political, cultural, and economic linkages among them. Rani-Henrik Andersson is an Academy of Finland Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Helsinki. "For the first time, historical perspective from Lakota accounts, both written and oral, have been given their rightful place, along with accounts from various Indian agents and the U.S. Army. . . . This book is the most well-rounded account of the subject to date."—Linda Wommack, True West 
Price: 47.74 USD
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20 ARCHULETA, MARGARET L.; CHILD, BRENDA J. & LOMAWAIMA, K. TSIANINA (EDITORS). Away From Home: American Indian Boarding School Experiences, 1879-2000.
Heard Museum, Phoenix. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
"Artfully weaving old photographs, first-person accounts, and well-organized text and verse, the editors present important and predominantly Native views of some 'good, bad, and ugly' aspects of Indian boarding school life.— Choice Margaret L. Archuleta is the curator of fine art for the Heard Museum. She has curated numerous exhibitions and has several publications to her credit on the subject of Native American fine art. Brenda J. Child is an associate professor of American studies and American Indian studies at the University of Minnesota. K. Tsianina Lomawaima has been a professor of American Indian studies at the University of Arizona since 1994. She earned her MA and PhD in anthropology from Stanford University. 7 x 11 inches, 144 pages 150 duotone photographs 
Price: 28.45 USD
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