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ENVIRONMENT.

ENVIRONMENT.

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1 The Inquisition Of Climate Science.
Columbia University Press, New York: 2011. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Modern science is under the greatest and most successful attack in recent history. An industry of denial, abetted by news media and "info-tainment" broadcasters more interested in selling controversy than presenting facts, has duped half the American public into rejecting the facts of climate science—an overwhelming body of rigorously vetted scientific evidence showing that human-caused, carbon-based emissions are linked to warming the Earth. The industry of climate science denial is succeeding: public acceptance has declined even as the scientific evidence for global warming has increased. It is vital that the public understand how anti-science ideologues, pseudo-scientists, and non-scientists have bamboozled them. We cannot afford to get global warming wrong—yet we are, thanks to deniers and their methods. The Inquisition of Climate Science is the first book to comprehensively take on the climate science denial movement and the deniers themselves, exposing their lack of credentials, their extensive industry funding, and their failure to provide any alternative theory to explain the observed evidence of warming. In this book, readers meet the most prominent deniers while dissecting their credentials, arguments, and lack of objectivity. James Lawrence Powell shows that the deniers use a wide variety of deceptive rhetorical techniques, many stretching back to ancient Greece. Carefully researched, fully referenced, and compellingly written, his book clearly reveals that the evidence of global warming is real and that an industry of denial has deceived the American public, putting them and their grandchildren at risk. James Lawrence Powell was born and raised in Kentucky and graduated from Berea College. He received his Ph.D. in Geochemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and has had a distinguished career as a college teacher, college president, museum director, and author of books on earth science for general audiences. He serves as executive director of the National Physical Science Consortium, a partnership among government agencies and laboratories, industry, and higher education dedicated to increasing the number of American citizens with graduate degrees in the physical sciences and related engineering fields, emphasizing recruitment of a diverse applicant pool that includes women and minorities. He has taught at Oberlin College and has served as its acting president. He has also been president of Franklin and Marshall College, Reed College, the Franklin Institute Science Museum in Philadelphia, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History. Both Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush appointed Powell to the National Science Board. "This book is a winner, written in an easy, logical style with thorough and fascinating discussions of major deniers." — Orrin Pilkey, Duke University, coauthor of The Rising Sea "With the evidence for global warming so strong, why, Powell asks, does half the American public doubt it? His answer is a history of the campaign of denial, the most comprehensive and up-to-date history available. It is well written and well worth reading: this is the most important issue facing our generation." — Spencer Weart, author of The Discovery of Global Warming "This courageous and well-researched book exposes how ideologues and money combined to attack sound climate science." — Richard Somerville, University of California, San Diego, author of The Forgiving Air: Understanding Environmental Change, second edition "Powell consistently brings the sharp insight of a knowledgeable insider melded with the skepticism of a critical outsider to the most important issues in science. In his latest book—his best yet—he shows us the path to understanding climate change." — Peter D. Ward, The University of Washington "James Lawrence Powell's must-read book is a welcome addition to the growing literature debunking fossil fuel-funded, anti-science disinformation. As Powell makes clear, it is time for scientists to stand up and be counted." — Joseph Romm, editor of Climate Progress and senior fellow at American Progress "… this is a highly authoritative and accessible book that should be read by everyone who has any doubts about the reality of climate change." — Irish Times 
Price: 26.55 USD
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2 ADAMS, RUTH. Say No!
Rodale Press, Emmaus: 1971. 0878570020 / 9780878570027 First Printing. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. Dustjacket has a gash in the back and the cover is also faded. 

Price: 11.40 USD
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3 ANDREWS, THOMAS G. Coyote Valley: Deep History In The High Rockies.
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts and London England: 2015. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
What can we learn from a high-country valley tucked into an isolated corner of Rocky Mountain National Park? In this pathbreaking book, Thomas Andrews offers a meditation on the environmental and historical pressures that have shaped and reshaped one small stretch of North America, from the last ice age to the advent of the Anthropocene and the latest controversies over climate change. Large-scale historical approaches continue to make monumental contributions to our understanding of the past, Andrews writes. But they are incapable of revealing everything we need to know about the interconnected workings of nature and human history. Alongside native peoples, miners, homesteaders, tourists, and conservationists, Andrews considers elk, willows, gold, mountain pine beetles, and the Colorado River as vital historical subjects. Integrating evidence from several historical fields with insights from ecology, archaeology, geology, and wildlife biology, this work simultaneously invites scientists to take history seriously and prevails upon historians to give other ways of knowing the past the attention they deserve. From the emergence and dispossession of the Nuche—"the People"—who for centuries adapted to a stubborn environment, to settlers intent on exploiting the land, to forest-destroying insect invasions and a warming climate that is pushing entire ecosystems to the brink of extinction, Coyote Valley underscores the value of deep drilling into local history for core relationships—to the land, climate, and other species—that complement broader truths. This book brings to the surface the critical lessons that only small and seemingly unimportant places on Earth can teach. 352 pages, 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches, 25 halftones, 4 maps. Thomas G. Andrews is Associate Professor of History at the University of Colorado Boulder. "Andrews has both the broad vision and the penetrating focus that major historians need… Overall a compelling [book]."—Mark Abley, The Times Literary Supplement "Andrews covers much ground—eons of time, too—from the prehistoric era to the present to offer a 'deep history' of a small patch of ground in the Rockies… Those with environmental concerns and others with interests in Native history will derive much from Andrews' fine book."—P. D. Travis, Choice "In this gracefully written, insightful, deeply researched history of an under-studied part of North America, Andrews tells a story of the fracturing of an environmental order. The chronological scope and interdisciplinary breadth of the work are impressive. This is environmental history at its best."—Andrew Isenberg, author of Wyatt Earp: A Vigilante Life "Andrews has followed up his Bancroft Prize-winning Killing for Coal with an exquisitely wrought portrait of an out-of-the-way place that must be central to our understanding of the American West's past, present, and future: the headwaters of the Colorado River in what today is Rocky Mountain National Park. Coyote Valley is brilliant and beautiful, a must-read for anyone interested in the complex history of the nation's iconic landscapes."—Ari Kelman, author of A Misplaced Massacre: Struggling over the Memory of Sand Creek "Those interested to learn how historians now write about the ever-changing dynamics among people, nature, and culture need look no further than this book. Coyote Valley defines the cutting edge of environmental history."—Pekka Hämäläinen, author of The Comanche Empire 
Price: 28.45 USD
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4 BARNEY, GERALD O. The Citizen's Policy Guide To Environmental Issues: The Unfinished Agenda - A Task Force Report Sponsored By The Rockefeller Brothers Fund.
Thomas Y. Crowell Company, New York: 1977. 0690014813 / 9780690014815 First Edition (Unstated). h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 
Responding to a transformation in national consciousness profound enough to change mankind's course, The Unfinished Agenda is a major document in environmental planning. Examines in detail the web of interdependent factors that sustain our bodies and our civilizations - land, food, energy, minerals, water, air, and the support system provided by plant and other animal species - and the ways in which governmewnt, the scientific community, the private sector, and the individual alter the structure of that web, sometimes irreversibly, perhaps catastophically. Includes an Index. 
Price: 34.91 USD
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5 BERGMAN, CHARLES. Wild Echoes: Encounters With The Most Endangered Animals In North America.
Alaska Northwest Books, Bothell: 1991. 0882404040 / 9780882404042 First Edition. s Softcover. Good condition. 
Focusing on nine gravely threatened species, the book puts the reader on the hard edge of the dilemma. Contains eight pages of black & white photos and an Index. 
Price: 5.27 USD
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6 BLUM, ELIZABETH D. Love Canal Revisited: Race, Class, And Gender In Environmental Activism.
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Thirty years after the headlines, Love Canal remains synonymous with toxic waste. When this neighborhood of Niagara Falls, New York, burst upon the nation's consciousness, the media focused on a working-class white woman named Lois Gibbs, who gained prominence as an activist fighting to save families from the poison buried beneath their homes. Her organization, the Love Canal Homeowners Association, challenged big government and big business—and ultimately won relocation. But as Elizabeth Blum now shows, the activists at Love Canal were a very diverse lot. Blum reveals that more lurks beneath the surface of this story than most people realize—and more than mere toxins. She takes readers behind the headlines to show that others besides Gibbs played important roles and to examine how race, class, and gender influenced the way people—from African American women to middle class white Christian groups—experienced the crisis and became active at Love Canal. Blum explores the often-rocky interracial relationships of the community, revealing how marginalized black women fought to be heard as they defined their environmental activism as an ongoing part of the civil rights struggle. And she examines how the middle-class Ecumenical Task Force—consisting of progressive, educated whites—helped to negotiate legal obstacles and to secure the means to relocate and compensate black residents. Blum also demonstrates how the crisis challenged gender lines far beyond casting mothers in activist roles. Women of the LCHA may have rejected feminism because of its anti-family stance, but they staunchly believed in their rights. And the incident changed the lives of working-class men, who found their wives in the front lines rather than in the kitchen. In addition, male bureaucrats and politicians ran into significant opposition from groups of both men and women who pressed for greater emphasis on health rather than economics for solutions to the crisis. No previous account of Love Canal has considered the plight of these other segments of the population. By doing so, Blum shows that environmental activism opens a window on broader social movements and ideas, such as civil rights and feminism. Her book moves the story of Love Canal well beyond its iconic legacy—the Superfund Act that makes polluters accountable—to highlight another vital legacy, one firmly rooted in race, class, and gender. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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7 BREWER, RICHARD. Conservancy
Dartmouth College Press / University Press of New England, Hanover: 2003. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
"Brewer...takes a panoramic view of land conservancy in the United States...[and] his book is also a how-to manual on establishing land trusts. Recommended for public and academic libraries supporting environmental policy or ecology programs."—Library Journal The first complete treatment of the U.S. land trust movement as a crucial feature of current efforts to protect the environment. Land trusts, or conservancies, protect land by owning it. Although many people are aware of a few large land trusts—The Nature Conservancy and the Trust for Public Land, for instance—there are now close to 1,300 local trusts, with more coming into being each month. American land trusts are diverse, shaped by their missions and adapted to their local environments. Nonetheless, all land trusts are private, non-profit organizations for which the acquisition and protection of land by direct action is the primary or sole mission. Nonconfrontational and apolitical, land trusts work with willing land owners in voluntary transactions. Although land trusts are the fastest-growing and most vital part of the land conservation movement today, this model of saving land by private action has become dominant only in the past two decades. Brewer tells why the advocacy model—in which private groups try to protect land by promoting government purchase or regulation— in the 1980s was eclipsed by the burgeoning land trust movement. He gives the public a much-needed primer on what land trusts are, what they do, how they are related to one another and to other elements of the conservation and environmental movements, and their importance to conservation in the coming decades. As Brewer points out, unlike other land-saving measures, land trust accomplishments are permanent. At the end of a cooperative process between a landowner and the local land trust, the land is saved in perpetuity. Brewer's book, the first comprehensive treatment of land trusts, combines a historical overview of the movement with more specific information on the different kinds of land trusts that exist and the problems they face. The volume also offers a "how-to" approach for persons and institutions interested in donating, selling, or buying land, discusses four major national land trusts (The Nature Conservancy, Trust for Public Land, American Farmland Trust, and Rails-to-Trails Conservancy); and gives a generous sampling of information about the activities and accomplishments of smaller, local trusts nationwide. Throughout, the book is enriched by historical narrative, analysis of successful land trusts, and information on the how and why of protecting land, as well as Brewer's intimate knowledge of ecological systems, biodiversity, and the interconnectedness of human and non-human life forms. Conservancy is a must-read volume for people interested in land conservation—including land trust members, volunteers and supporters—as well as anyone concerned about land use and the environment. "A must-read for people interested in land conservation! Written for land trust members, volunteers and supporters —as well as anyone concerned about land use and the environment. This is the first comprehensive treatment of land trusts that combines a historical overview of the movement with more specific information on the different kinds of land trusts that exist and the problems they face."—The Land Trust Alliance "This book fills a void. It is the first to comprehensively trace the history, the people, the spirit, and the present state of the art in land trusts. It is a helpful guide for community planners, land trust board members, employees, donors, and persons interested in the conservation ethic of our time."—Planning and Zoning Newsl "The book is an important contribution to understanding a new and growing segment of the conservation movement. It is well written, and the author's style, one that should appeal to a broad audience, makes it an enjoyable read."—Human Ecology Richard Brewer is Professor Emeritus, Department of Biological Sciences, Western Michigan University. He has served as the President of the Southwest Michigan Land Conservancy and the Kalamazoo Nature Center, and he has chaired the Michigan Technical Committee for the Endangered Species Program (Birds). His books include The Science of Ecology (1994) and The Atlas of Breeding Birds of Michigan (1991). 
Price: 21.80 USD
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8 BROOKS, DAVID. Restoring The Shining Waters: Superfund Success At Milltown, Montana.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2015. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
No sooner had the EPA established the Superfund program in 1980 to clean up the nation's toxic waste dumps and other abandoned hazardous waste sites, than a little Montana town found itself topping the new program's National Priority List. Milltown, a place too small to warrant a listing in the U.S. Census, sat alongside a modest hydroelectric dam at the confluence of the Clark Fork and Blackfoot Rivers. For three-quarters of a century, arsenic-laced waste from some of the world's largest copper-mining operations had accumulated behind the dam. Soon, Milltown became the site of Superfund's first dam removal and watershed restoration, marking a turning point in U.S. environmental history. The story of this dramatic shift is the tale of individuals rallying to reclaim a place they valued beyond its utility. In Restoring the Shining Waters, David Brooks gives an intimate account of how local citizens—homeowners, university scientists, county health officials, grassroots environmentalists, business leaders, and thousands of engaged residents—brought about the removal of Milltown Dam. Interviews with townspeople, outside environmentalists, mining executives, and federal officials reveal how the everyday actions of individuals got the dam removed and, in the process, pushed Superfund to allow more public participation in decision making and to emphasize restoration over containment of polluted environments. A federal program designed to deal with the toxic legacies of industrialization thus became a starting point for restoring America's most damaged environments, largely through the efforts of local communities. With curiosity, conviction, and a strong sense of place, the small town of Milltown helped restore an iconic western river valley—and in doing so, shaped the history of Superfund and modern environmentalism. 17 black-and-white Illustrations, 1 map, 280 pages, 6" x 9". David Brooks is lead historian and Vice President of the Heritage Research Center in Missoula, Montana. He teaches history of the American West at the University of Montana. "At last, the Clark Fork River has found its historian. David Brooks's treatment of the Clark Fork and the Milltown Dam is beautifully written, exhaustively researched, thorough, and fair. In the spirit of Edward Abbey, Restoring the Shining Waters tells the story of what legal monkey-wrenching can do to save America's impounded waterways. It is a model study in environmental history and political risk taking—the definitive account of a long and arduous struggle to restore a significant and lovely river."—David M. Emmons, author of The Butte Irish: Class and Ethnicity in an American Mining Town, 1875-1925 
Price: 33.20 USD
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9 BROOKS, KARL BOYD. Before Earth Day: The Origins Of American Environmental Law, 1945-1970.
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Most Americans—even environmentalists—date the emergence of laws protecting nature to the early 1970s. But Karl Boyd Brooks shows that, far from being a product of that activist decade, American environmental law emerged well before the first Earth Day, often in unexpected places far from Capitol Hill. Surveying the landscape from the end of World War II to Earth Day 1970, Brooks traces a dramatic shift in Americans' relationship to the environment and the emergence of new environmental statutes. He takes readers into legislative hearing rooms, lawyers' conferences, and administrators' offices to describe how Americans forged a new body of law that reflected their hopes for rescuing the land from air pollution, deforestation, and other potential threats. For while previous law had treated nature as a commodity, more and more Americans had come to see it as a national treasure worth preserving. Brooks explores the way key features of the New Deal's legal legacy influenced environmental law. This path-breaking environmental history examines how cultural, intellectual, and economic changes in postwar America brought about new solutions to environmental problems that threatened public health and degraded natural aesthetics. Visiting riverbanks and freeways, duck blinds and airsheds, Before Earth Day reveals the new strategies and efforts by which the unceasing process of legal change created environmental law. And through real-world examples—how Los Angelenos pressed cases about water and air quality, how an Idaho lawyer helped clients pursue new environmental regulations, how citizens challenged government and corporate plans to dam rivers—Brooks demonstrates that key changes in property, procedure, contract, and other legal rules in those early years stimulated the national environmental laws to come. Gracefully written and meticulously researched, Brooks's work dramatically updates our understanding of the origins of environmental law. By taking the postwar years more seriously, he shows that earlier actions across the country played a central role in shaping the structure and goals of well-known federal laws passed during the "environmental decade" of the seventies. Before Earth Day describes nothing less than an entirely new way of thinking, as environmental law emerged from local jurisdictions to reshape national agendas, firing the popular imagination and only then remodeling law school curricula. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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10 BROOKS, KARL BOYD. Before Earth Day: The Origins Of American Environmental Law, 1945-1970.
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: . h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Most Americans—even environmentalists—date the emergence of laws protecting nature to the early 1970s. But Karl Boyd Brooks shows that, far from being a product of that activist decade, American environmental law emerged well before the first Earth Day, often in unexpected places far from Capitol Hill. Surveying the landscape from the end of World War II to Earth Day 1970, Brooks traces a dramatic shift in Americans' relationship to the environment and the emergence of new environmental statutes. He takes readers into legislative hearing rooms, lawyers' conferences, and administrators' offices to describe how Americans forged a new body of law that reflected their hopes for rescuing the land from air pollution, deforestation, and other potential threats. For while previous law had treated nature as a commodity, more and more Americans had come to see it as a national treasure worth preserving. Brooks explores the way key features of the New Deal's legal legacy influenced environmental law. This path-breaking environmental history examines how cultural, intellectual, and economic changes in postwar America brought about new solutions to environmental problems that threatened public health and degraded natural aesthetics. Visiting riverbanks and freeways, duck blinds and airsheds, Before Earth Day reveals the new strategies and efforts by which the unceasing process of legal change created environmental law. And through real-world examples—how Los Angelenos pressed cases about water and air quality, how an Idaho lawyer helped clients pursue new environmental regulations, how citizens challenged government and corporate plans to dam rivers—Brooks demonstrates that key changes in property, procedure, contract, and other legal rules in those early years stimulated the national environmental laws to come. Gracefully written and meticulously researched, Brooks's work dramatically updates our understanding of the origins of environmental law. By taking the postwar years more seriously, he shows that earlier actions across the country played a central role in shaping the structure and goals of well-known federal laws passed during the "environmental decade" of the seventies. Before Earth Day describes nothing less than an entirely new way of thinking, as environmental law emerged from local jurisdictions to reshape national agendas, firing the popular imagination and only then remodeling law school curricula. 
Price: 37.95 USD
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11 BROWN, DONA. Back To The Land: The Enduring Dream Of Self-sufficiency In Modern America.
University of Wisconsin Press, Madison: . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
For many, "going back to the land" brings to mind the 1960s and 1970s—hippie communes and the Summer of Love, The Whole Earth Catalog and Mother Earth News. More recently, the movement has reemerged in a new enthusiasm for locally produced food and more sustainable energy paths. But these latest back-to-the-landers are part of a much larger story. Americans have been dreaming of returning to the land ever since they started to leave it. In Back to the Land, Dona Brown explores the history of this recurring impulse. Back-to-the-landers have often been viewed as nostalgic escapists or romantic nature-lovers. But their own words reveal a more complex story. In such projects as Gustav Stickley's Craftsman Farms, Frank Lloyd Wright's "Broadacre City," and Helen and Scott Nearing's quest for "the good life," Brown finds that the return to the farm has meant less a going-backwards than a going-forwards, a way to meet the challenges of the modern era. Progressive reformers pushed for homesteading to help impoverished workers get out of unhealthy urban slums. Depression-era back-to-the-landers, wary of the centralizing power of the New Deal, embraced a new "third way" politics of decentralism and regionalism. Later still, the movement merged with environmentalism. To understand Americans' response to these back-to-the- land ideas, Brown turns to the fan letters of ordinary readers— retired teachers and overworked clerks, recent immigrants and single women. In seeking their rural roots, Brown argues, Americans have striven above all for the independence and self-sufficiency they associate with the agrarian ideal. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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12 CAHALANE, VICTOR H. (EDITOR); CANDY, ROBERT (ILLUSTRATOR). Alive In The Wild.
Prentice-Hall, Englewod Cliffs: 1970. 1302221600 h Hardcover with dustjacket. Very good condition. 
The alligator, buffalo, sea lion, caribou, grizzly bear, and golden eagle: the life stories of these and many other fascinating animals are told by 35 outstanding North American naturalists. Includes an Index and numerous drawings. 
Price: 3.66 USD
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13 CARSON, RACHEL L. The Sea Around Us.
Oxford University Press, London: 1951. h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Fair condition. Cover has slight chips and scratches. Water stains on pages. 
Here is an enthralling, informative story of the dominating feature of our planet, the ocean. Told with literary skill and scientific accuracy, The Sea Around Us focuses on what is humanly interesting and significant in the life history of the ocean. Includes an Index. 
Price: 7.60 USD
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14 CARSON, RACHEL L. The Sea Around Us.
Oxford University Press, London: 1951. Fifteenth Printing. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Fair condition. Dustjacket is quite worn. 
Here is an enthralling, informative story of the dominating feature of our planet, the ocean. Told with literary skill and scientific accuracy, The Sea Around Us focuses on what is humanly interesting and significant in the life history of the ocean. Includes an Index. 
Price: 7.84 USD
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15 CARSON, RACHEL L. The Sea Around Us.
Oxford University Press, London: 1951. Forteenth Printing. h Hardcover in protective mylar cover. Good condition. 
Here is an enthralling, informative story of the dominating feature of our planet, the ocean. Told with literary skill and scientific accuracy, The Sea Around Us focuses on what is humanly interesting and significant in the life history of the ocean. Includes an Index. 
Price: 7.84 USD
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16 CARSON, RACHEL L. The Sea Around Us.
New American Library, New York: 1961. Nineteenth Printing. s Softcover. Good condition. 
Here is an enthralling, informative story of the dominating feature of our planet, the ocean. Told with literary skill and scientific accuracy, The Sea Around Us focuses on what is humanly interesting and significant in the life history of the ocean. Includes an Index. 
Price: 2.85 USD
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17 CHRISTENSEN, LAIRD; CRIMMEL, HAL (EDITORS). Teaching About Place: Learning From The Land.
University of Nevada Press, Reno: 2008. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
These sixteen new essays offer new insights into the practice of teaching about place. The astonishing mobility of modern Americans and the homogenizing tendencies of our economy and society have left us detached from an authentic connection to place and knowledge of the regions we occupy. This detachment not only prevents us from protecting the ecosystems we inhabit but frustrates our innate craving to feel rooted. The seventeen writers who contribute to Teaching About Place - all of them distinguished environmental educator - reflect on the challenges of teaching students about place and their connection to it. In some cases, this effort involves exploring a specific bioregion, its nature, history, and culture, and the impact of human presence. In others, teaching involves more conceptual activities, such as examining the perceptions that connect us to a place or comparing feminist and bioregionalist notions of home. Sometimes, teaching involves a range of interdisciplinary activities; other times, students engage in direct observation of a neglected or unappreciated setting in order to discover the factors that foster the ecological, emotional, and economic health of a place. The settings discussed in these essays are remarkably diverse: the Hudson River Valley; the Los Angeles Basin; the Green Mountains of Vermont; the Salt Lake Valley; the South Carolina piedmont; a coastal Maine salt marsh; the Nebraska prairie; a degraded creek in Idaho; Houston's heavily industrialized landscape; eastern Washington State; the Yellowstone ecosystem; and Dinosaur National Monument, which straddles the Utah-Colorado border. In each case, the author found ways to engage students - even the nontraditional or resistant - and to produce meaningful insights into the role of humans in the communities of life that share our world. Teaching About Place is an important record of experiments in the growing practice of place-based pedagogy, examining both the possibilities and the limitations of this approach. It is also fascinating reading for anyone curious about the natural world around us and the ways humans understand, use, and sometimes abuse the environments that we inhabit. Laird Christensen is associate professor of English and Environmental Studies at Green Mountain College, where he also directs the environmental studies graduate program. He has published many poems and numerous essays on environmental subjects. Hal Crimmel is associate professor of English at Weber State University. He is the author of Dinosaur: Four Seasons on the Green and Yampa Rivers, editor of Teaching in the Field: Working with Students in the Outdoor Classroom, and has published numerous essays on wilderness and outdoor-related topics. "This book unites narratives from the most renowned environmental educators working today into a powerful collection that convincingly argues for the benefit of place-based environmental education." - Corey Lewis, author of Reading the Trail: Exploring the Literature and Natural History of the California Crest "The book is an important record of experiments in the growing practice of place-based pedagogy, examining both the possibilities and the limitations of this approach. It is also fascinating reading for anyone curious about the natural world and the ways we humans understand, use, and sometimes abuse the environments we inhabit. - Abstracts of Public Administration, Development, and Environment Contents Contributors: SueEllen Campbell, Laird Christensen, Hal Crimmel, Terrell Dixon, John Elder, Cheryll Glotfelty, Ellen Goldey, Greg Gordon, Rochelle Johnson, John Lane, Paul Lindholdt, Jeffrey Mathes McCarthy, Bradley John Monsma, John Price, Kent C. Ryden, Lisa Slappey, Ann Zwinger, and Susan Zwinger 
Price: 23.70 USD
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18 COHEN, RICHARD E. Washington At Work: Back Rooms And Clean Air.
Macmillan Publishing Co., New York: 1992. 0023231904 / 9780023231902 Fifth printing. s Softcover. Good condition. 
Explains and analyzes the largest, most complex, and most expensive environmental law ever passed by the United States Congress. Captures the complexity of the legislative process without losing the reader in a morass of detail. Includes an Index. 
Price: 28.45 USD
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19 CONKLIN, EDWIN GRANT. Heredity And Environment In The Development Of Man.
Princeton University Press, Princeton: 1917. First Edition. h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Good condition considering its age. 

Price: 19.95 USD
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20 CONSUMER GUIDE EDITORS. Energy Savers Catalog
Beekman House, New York: 1979 . 0517305887 / 9780517305881 h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 

Price: 4.51 USD
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