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1 ALMEIDA SANTOS, OSMAR DE. Brazilian Portuguese- English/ English- Brazilian Portuguese Dictionary And Phrasebook.
Hippocrene Books, New York: 0781810078 / 9780781810074 s Softcover. Brand new book. 
This bilingual dictionary and travel-oriented phrasebook focuses on the Portuguese of Brazil, which is spoken by more than 170 million people worldwide. * Over 6,000 total dictionary entries * Travel tips and cultural information * Colloquial Brazilian expressions and terms * Comprehensive grammar and pronunciation sections * Perfect for travelers, businesspersons, and students 
Price: 13.25 USD
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2 ANTONIL, ANDRE JOAO. Brazil At The Dawn Of The Eighteenth Century.
University Press of New England: . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
First published in 1711, Brazil at the Dawn of the Eighteenth Century describes the four major economic activities of the Brazilian colony. Half the book is devoted to the sugar industry and the social world of those who grew the sugarcane. Other sections give a detailed view of the tobacco industry. Further, this work describes where and how gold was extracted, the new and old routes connecting Minas Gerais with the coast, and the rough-and-tumble world of the miners. Antonil concludes with discussion of the economic importance of cattle, and information on Brazilian exports and taxes. No other work provides this level of eyewitness detail. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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3 ATENCIO, REBECCA J. Memory's Turn: Reckoning With Dictatorship In Brazil.
University of Wisconsin Press, Madison: 2014. Critical Human Rights Series. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
After twenty-one years of military dictatorship, Brazil returned to democratic rule in 1985. Yet over the following two decades, the country largely ignored human rights crimes committed by state security agents, crimes that included the torture, murder, and disappearance of those who opposed the authoritarian regime. In clear and engaging prose, Rebecca J. Atencio tells the story of the slow turn to memory in Brazil, a turn that has taken place in both politics and in cultural production. She shows how testimonial literature, telenovelas, literary novels, theatrical plays, and memorials have interacted with policies adopted by the Brazilian state, often in unexpected ways. Under the right circumstances, official and cultural forms of reckoning combine in Brazil to produce what Atencio calls cycles of cultural memory. Novel meanings of the past are forged, and new cultural works are inspired, thus creating the possibility for further turns in the cycle. The first book to analyze Brazil's reckoning with dictatorship through both institutional and cultural means, Memory's Turn is a rich, informative exploration of the interplay between these different modes of memory reconstruction. Jesse Lee Kercheval. Rebecca J. Atencio is an assistant professor of Brazilian literary and cultural studies at Tulane University. Founder of the blog Transitional Justice in Brazil, she lives in New Orleans, Louisiana. "An extremely well-written, engaging, and interesting contribution to the scholarship on postdictatorial memory construction in Latin America. Atencio allows readers to see the multiple and layered ways in which postconflict societies construct and contest the meanings of the past." —Michael J. Lazzara, author of Chile in Transition "A major book that takes the field of human rights in a new direction. Atencio enables us to see a powerful dialectic of culture and institutions and its relevance for understanding human rights."—Steve J. Stern, series editor 
Price: 25.60 USD
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4 BAIOCCHI, GIANPAOLO; HELLER, PATRICK & SILVA, MARCELO K. Bootstrapping Democracy: Transforming Local Governance And Civil Society In Brazil.
Stanford University Press, Palo Alto: 2011. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Despite increasing interest in how involvement in local government can improve governance and lead to civic renewal, questions remain about participation's real impact. This book investigates participatory budgeting—a mainstay now of World Bank, UNDP, and USAID development programs—to ask whether its reforms truly make a difference in deepening democracy and empowering civil society. Looking closely at eight cities in Brazil, comparing those that carried out participatory budgeting reforms between 1997 and 2000 with those that did not, the authors examine whether and how institutional reforms take effect. Bootstrapping Democracy highlights the importance of local-level innovations and democratic advances, charting a middle path between those who theorize that globalization hollows out democracy and those who celebrate globalization as a means of fostering democratic values. Uncovering the state's role in creating an "associational environment," it reveals the contradictory ways institutional reforms shape the democratic capabilities of civil society and how outcomes are conditioned by relations between the state and civil society. Gianpaolo Baiocchi is Associate Professor of Sociology at Brown University. He is the author of Militants and Citizens: The Politics of Participatory Democracy in Porto Alegre (Stanford University Press, 2005) and Radicals in Power: The Workers' Party and Experiments in Urban Democracy in Brazil (2003). Patrick Heller is Associate Professor of Sociology at Brown University. He is the coauthor of Social Democracy in the Global Periphery: Origins and Prospects (2007) and author of The Labor Development: Workers and the Transformation of Capitalism in Kerala, India (1999). Marcelo Kunrath Silva is Associate Professor of Sociology and Rural Sociology at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. "Insightful, subtle, and persuasively argued, Bootstrapping Democracy is a wonderful contribution to political theory and comparative politics. Writing on Brazil's two-decade-long experiment in participatory budgeting, Baiocchi, Heller, and Silva defend democracy's great promise: to turn citizens from clients into self-governing agents who, deploying their human powers, direct politics to a common good."—Joshua Cohen, Stanford University "Baiocchi, Heller, and Silva go beyond examining the 'success' of participatory budgeting to assess its actual impact in terms of government services and the further development of civil society. This clear, original work fills a very large void and really is incomparable."—Philip Oxhorn, McGill University "Bootstrapping Democracy is an exciting breath of fresh air in an era when the intellectual debate on how to construct effective democratic politics seems in danger of becoming sterile. Baiocchi, Heller, and Silva put an impressive set of empirical data together with an original theoretical perspective to create a positive thesis that should have a powerful invigorating impact on the democracy debate." —Peter Evans, University of California, Berkeley Despite increasing interest in how involvement in local government can improve governance and lead to civic renewal, questions remain about participation's real impact. This book investigates participatory budgeting—a mainstay now of World Bank, UNDP, and USAID development programs—to ask whether its reforms truly make a difference in deepening democracy and empowering civil society. Looking closely at eight cities in Brazil, comparing those that carried out participatory budgeting reforms between 1997 and 2000 with those that did not, the authors examine whether and how institutional reforms take effect. Bootstrapping Democracy highlights the importance of local-level innovations and democratic advances, charting a middle path between those who theorize that globalization hollows out democracy and those who celebrate globalization as a means of fostering democratic values. Uncovering the state's role in creating an "associational environment," it reveals the contradictory ways institutional reforms shape the democratic capabilities of civil society and how outcomes are conditioned by relations between the state and civil society. Gianpaolo Baiocchi is Associate Professor of Sociology at Brown University. He is the author of Militants and Citizens: The Politics of Participatory Democracy in Porto Alegre (Stanford University Press, 2005) and Radicals in Power: The Workers' Party and Experiments in Urban Democracy in Brazil(2003). Patrick Heller is Associate Professor of Sociology at Brown University. He is the coauthor of Social Democracy in the Global Periphery: Origins and Prospects (2007) and author of The Labor Development: Workers and the Transformation of Capitalism in Kerala, India (1999). Marcelo Kunrath Silva is Associate Professor of Sociology and Rural Sociology at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. 
Price: 20.85 USD
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5 BAIOCCHI, GIANPAOLO; HELLER, PATRICK & SILVA, MARCELO K. Bootstrapping Democracy: Transforming Local Governance And Civil Society In Brazil.
Stanford University Press, Palo Alto: 2011. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Despite increasing interest in how involvement in local government can improve governance and lead to civic renewal, questions remain about participation's real impact. This book investigates participatory budgeting—a mainstay now of World Bank, UNDP, and USAID development programs—to ask whether its reforms truly make a difference in deepening democracy and empowering civil society. Looking closely at eight cities in Brazil, comparing those that carried out participatory budgeting reforms between 1997 and 2000 with those that did not, the authors examine whether and how institutional reforms take effect. Bootstrapping Democracy highlights the importance of local-level innovations and democratic advances, charting a middle path between those who theorize that globalization hollows out democracy and those who celebrate globalization as a means of fostering democratic values. Uncovering the state's role in creating an "associational environment," it reveals the contradictory ways institutional reforms shape the democratic capabilities of civil society and how outcomes are conditioned by relations between the state and civil society. Gianpaolo Baiocchi is Associate Professor of Sociology at Brown University. He is the author of Militants and Citizens: The Politics of Participatory Democracy in Porto Alegre (Stanford University Press, 2005) and Radicals in Power: The Workers' Party and Experiments in Urban Democracy in Brazil (2003). Patrick Heller is Associate Professor of Sociology at Brown University. He is the coauthor of Social Democracy in the Global Periphery: Origins and Prospects (2007) and author of The Labor Development: Workers and the Transformation of Capitalism in Kerala, India (1999). Marcelo Kunrath Silva is Associate Professor of Sociology and Rural Sociology at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. "Insightful, subtle, and persuasively argued, Bootstrapping Democracy is a wonderful contribution to political theory and comparative politics. Writing on Brazil's two-decade-long experiment in participatory budgeting, Baiocchi, Heller, and Silva defend democracy's great promise: to turn citizens from clients into self-governing agents who, deploying their human powers, direct politics to a common good."—Joshua Cohen, Stanford University "Baiocchi, Heller, and Silva go beyond examining the 'success' of participatory budgeting to assess its actual impact in terms of government services and the further development of civil society. This clear, original work fills a very large void and really is incomparable."—Philip Oxhorn, McGill University "Bootstrapping Democracy is an exciting breath of fresh air in an era when the intellectual debate on how to construct effective democratic politics seems in danger of becoming sterile. Baiocchi, Heller, and Silva put an impressive set of empirical data together with an original theoretical perspective to create a positive thesis that should have a powerful invigorating impact on the democracy debate." —Peter Evans, University of California, Berkeley Despite increasing interest in how involvement in local government can improve governance and lead to civic renewal, questions remain about participation's real impact. This book investigates participatory budgeting—a mainstay now of World Bank, UNDP, and USAID development programs—to ask whether its reforms truly make a difference in deepening democracy and empowering civil society. Looking closely at eight cities in Brazil, comparing those that carried out participatory budgeting reforms between 1997 and 2000 with those that did not, the authors examine whether and how institutional reforms take effect. Bootstrapping Democracy highlights the importance of local-level innovations and democratic advances, charting a middle path between those who theorize that globalization hollows out democracy and those who celebrate globalization as a means of fostering democratic values. Uncovering the state's role in creating an "associational environment," it reveals the contradictory ways institutional reforms shape the democratic capabilities of civil society and how outcomes are conditioned by relations between the state and civil society. Gianpaolo Baiocchi is Associate Professor of Sociology at Brown University. He is the author of Militants and Citizens: The Politics of Participatory Democracy in Porto Alegre (Stanford University Press, 2005) and Radicals in Power: The Workers' Party and Experiments in Urban Democracy in Brazil(2003). Patrick Heller is Associate Professor of Sociology at Brown University. He is the coauthor of Social Democracy in the Global Periphery: Origins and Prospects (2007) and author of The Labor Development: Workers and the Transformation of Capitalism in Kerala, India (1999). Marcelo Kunrath Silva is Associate Professor of Sociology and Rural Sociology at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. 
Price: 76.00 USD
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6 BOSI, ALFREDO; NEWCOMB, ROBERT PATRICK (TRANSLATOR). Brazil And The Dialectic Of Colonization.
University of Illinois Press, Urbana and Chicago: 2015. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The provocative classic in its first-ever English translation A classic of Brazilian literary criticism and historiography, Brazil and the Dialectic of Colonization explores the unique character of Brazil from its colonial beginnings to its emergence as a modern nation. This translation presents the thought of Alfredo Bosi, one of contemporary Brazil's leading intellectuals, to an English-speaking audience. Portugal extracted wealth from its Brazilian colony. Slaves--first indigenous peoples, later Africans--mined its ore and cut its sugarcane. From the customs of the colonists and the aspirations of the enslaved rose Brazil. Bosi scrutinizes signal points in the creation of Brazilian culture--the plays and poetry, the sermons of missionaries and Jesuit priests, the Indian novels of José de Alencar and the Voices of Africa of poet Castro Alves. His portrait of the country's response to the pressures of colonial conformity offers a groundbreaking appraisal of Brazilian culture as it emerged from the tensions between imposed colonial control and the African and Amerindian cults--including the Catholic-influenced ones--that resisted it. Wide-ranging and provocative, Brazil and the Dialectic of Colonization reconceives the material and symbolic processes behind colonization, and daringly links the economic practices of its agents to their means of survival, their memory, their ways of representing themselves and others, and their desires and hopes. Alfredo Bosi is the director of the Institute of Advanced Studies at the University of Sčo Paolo. He is the author of A Concise History of Brazilian Literature. Robert Patrick Newcomb is an associate professor of Luso-Brazilian studies at the University of California, Davis. "This classic of Brazilian literary and social criticism defies the artificial boundaries dividing the colonial from the modern, the religious from the secular, or 'high' from 'popular' culture. This singular survey offers a penetrating interpretation of the moral dynamics and contradictions that characterized missionaries, sculptors, poets, novelists, popular artists, and lawyers across three centuries. Ranging widely from elite literary texts and baroque sculpture to 'archaic' Catholic folk images and positivist reveries, it offers a dazzling exegesis of language, metaphor, and allegory while connecting past and present as a spiral through time within the Luso-Brazilian colonial space. . . . A must-read tour de force."--John D. French, author of Drowning in Laws: Labor Law and Brazilian Political Culture "In an array of masterfully crafted literary and cultural analyses, this book sheds light on the experience of people who navigate the troubled waters of the colonial condition. Moved by those who lacked an established voice in the colonial world, Bosi explores the inner drama of those who witnessed and wrote about a Brazil in the making: surrounded by the illiterate, where did their loyalties lie?"--Pedro Meira Monteiro, Princeton University "A modern Brazilian classic. Written by a distinguished professor of literature, the essay ranges across several disciplines. Each chapter is organized around a particular moment in national history, illustrating fundamental themes of Brazilian culture. In the final chapter, the author relates what Robert Redfield called the Great Tradition ('high' culture) to the Little Tradition (popular culture), showing how they have borrowed and adapted from each other across the centuries."--Joseph L. Love, former director, Lemann Institute of Brazilian Studies, University of Illinois Funds for the publication of this translation were provided by the Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and by the Ministerio da Cultura do Brasil / Fundaćčo Biblioteca Nacional. 
Price: 33.25 USD
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7 BOSI, ALFREDO; NEWCOMB, ROBERT PATRICK (TRANSLATOR). Brazil And The Dialectic Of Colonization.
University of Illinois Press, Urbana and Chicago: 2015. h Hardcover as issued without dustjacket. Brand new book. 
The provocative classic in its first-ever English translation A classic of Brazilian literary criticism and historiography, Brazil and the Dialectic of Colonization explores the unique character of Brazil from its colonial beginnings to its emergence as a modern nation. This translation presents the thought of Alfredo Bosi, one of contemporary Brazil's leading intellectuals, to an English-speaking audience. Portugal extracted wealth from its Brazilian colony. Slaves--first indigenous peoples, later Africans--mined its ore and cut its sugarcane. From the customs of the colonists and the aspirations of the enslaved rose Brazil. Bosi scrutinizes signal points in the creation of Brazilian culture--the plays and poetry, the sermons of missionaries and Jesuit priests, the Indian novels of José de Alencar and the Voices of Africa of poet Castro Alves. His portrait of the country's response to the pressures of colonial conformity offers a groundbreaking appraisal of Brazilian culture as it emerged from the tensions between imposed colonial control and the African and Amerindian cults--including the Catholic-influenced ones--that resisted it. Wide-ranging and provocative, Brazil and the Dialectic of Colonization reconceives the material and symbolic processes behind colonization, and daringly links the economic practices of its agents to their means of survival, their memory, their ways of representing themselves and others, and their desires and hopes. Alfredo Bosi is the director of the Institute of Advanced Studies at the University of Sčo Paolo. He is the author of A Concise History of Brazilian Literature. Robert Patrick Newcomb is an associate professor of Luso-Brazilian studies at the University of California, Davis. "This classic of Brazilian literary and social criticism defies the artificial boundaries dividing the colonial from the modern, the religious from the secular, or 'high' from 'popular' culture. This singular survey offers a penetrating interpretation of the moral dynamics and contradictions that characterized missionaries, sculptors, poets, novelists, popular artists, and lawyers across three centuries. Ranging widely from elite literary texts and baroque sculpture to 'archaic' Catholic folk images and positivist reveries, it offers a dazzling exegesis of language, metaphor, and allegory while connecting past and present as a spiral through time within the Luso-Brazilian colonial space. . . . A must-read tour de force."--John D. French, author of Drowning in Laws: Labor Law and Brazilian Political Culture "In an array of masterfully crafted literary and cultural analyses, this book sheds light on the experience of people who navigate the troubled waters of the colonial condition. Moved by those who lacked an established voice in the colonial world, Bosi explores the inner drama of those who witnessed and wrote about a Brazil in the making: surrounded by the illiterate, where did their loyalties lie?"--Pedro Meira Monteiro, Princeton University "A modern Brazilian classic. Written by a distinguished professor of literature, the essay ranges across several disciplines. Each chapter is organized around a particular moment in national history, illustrating fundamental themes of Brazilian culture. In the final chapter, the author relates what Robert Redfield called the Great Tradition ('high' culture) to the Little Tradition (popular culture), showing how they have borrowed and adapted from each other across the centuries."--Joseph L. Love, former director, Lemann Institute of Brazilian Studies, University of Illinois Funds for the publication of this translation were provided by the Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and by the Ministerio da Cultura do Brasil / Fundaćčo Biblioteca Nacional. 
Price: 90.25 USD
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8 BURNS, E. BRADFORD. A History Of Brazil.
Columbia University Press, New York: 1980. 0231047495 / 9780231047494 Second Edition. s Softcover. Very good condition. 
A panoramic interpretation of the Brazilian past from discovery to the present that treats the economic, social, cultural and political evolutions of Latin America's largest nation. Includes an Index. 
Price: 14.25 USD
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9 DAVIS, SHELTON H. Victims Of The Miracle: Development And The Indians Of Brazil.
Cambridge University Press, Cambridge: 1977. 0521217385 / 9780521217385 First Printing. h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Good condition. Library discard. 
The central contention of this book is that the massive amount of disease, death, and human suffering unleashed upon Brazilian Indians in the early 1970s is a direct result of the economic development policies of the military government of Brazil. Includes an Index. 
Price: 29.55 USD
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10 DUFFY, EVE M. & METCALF, ALIDA C. The Return Of Hans Staden: A Go-between In The Atlantic World.
The Johns Hopkins Universiy Press, Baltimore and London: 2011. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Hans Staden's sixteenth-century account of shipwreck and captivity by the Tupinambá Indians of Brazil was an early modern bestseller. This retelling of the German sailor's eyewitness account known as the True History shows both why it was so popular at the time and why it remains an important tool for understanding the opening of the Atlantic world. Eve M. Duffy and Alida C. Metcalf carefully reconstruct Staden's life as a German soldier, his two expeditions to the Americas, and his subsequent shipwreck, captivity, brush with cannibalism, escape, and return. The authors explore how these events and experiences were recreated in the text and images of the True History. Focusing on Staden's multiple roles as a go-between, Duffy and Metcalf address many of the issues that emerge when cultures come into contact and conflict. An artful and accessible interpretation, The Return of Hans Staden takes a text best known for its sensational tale of cannibalism and shows how it can be reinterpreted as a window into the precariousness of lives on both sides of early modern encounters, when such issues as truth and lying, violence, religious belief, and cultural difference were key to the formation of the Atlantic world. Eve M. Duffy is the director of the Program in the Humanities and Human Values at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Alida C. Metcalf is the Harris Masterson, Jr. Professor of History at Rice University and the author of Go-betweens and the Colonization of Brazil, 1500-1600. 
Price: 57.00 USD
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11 DUFFY, EVE M. & METCALF, ALIDA C. The Return Of Hans Staden: A Go-between In The Atlantic World.
The Johns Hopkins Universiy Press, Baltimore and London: 2011. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Hans Staden's sixteenth-century account of shipwreck and captivity by the Tupinambá Indians of Brazil was an early modern bestseller. This retelling of the German sailor's eyewitness account known as the True History shows both why it was so popular at the time and why it remains an important tool for understanding the opening of the Atlantic world. Eve M. Duffy and Alida C. Metcalf carefully reconstruct Staden's life as a German soldier, his two expeditions to the Americas, and his subsequent shipwreck, captivity, brush with cannibalism, escape, and return. The authors explore how these events and experiences were recreated in the text and images of the True History. Focusing on Staden's multiple roles as a go-between, Duffy and Metcalf address many of the issues that emerge when cultures come into contact and conflict. An artful and accessible interpretation, The Return of Hans Staden takes a text best known for its sensational tale of cannibalism and shows how it can be reinterpreted as a window into the precariousness of lives on both sides of early modern encounters, when such issues as truth and lying, violence, religious belief, and cultural difference were key to the formation of the Atlantic world. Eve M. Duffy is the director of the Program in the Humanities and Human Values at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Alida C. Metcalf is the Harris Masterson, Jr. Professor of History at Rice University and the author of Go-betweens and the Colonization of Brazil, 1500-1600. 
Price: 23.51 USD
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12 FISCHER, BRODWYN. A Poverty Of Rights: Citizenship And Inequality In Twentieth-century Rio De Janeiro.
Stanford University Press, Stanford: 2011. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
A Poverty of Rights is an investigation of the knotty ties between citizenship and inequality during the years when the legal and institutional bases for modern Brazilian citizenship originated. Between 1930 and 1964, Brazilian law dramatically extended its range and power, and citizenship began to signify real political, economic, and civil rights for common people. And yet, even in Rio de Janeiro—Brazil's national capital until 1960—this process did not include everyone. Rio's poorest residents sought with hope, imagination, and will to claim myriad forms of citizenship as their own. Yet, blocked by bureaucratic obstacles or ignored by unrealistic laws, they found that their poverty remained one of rights as well as resources. At the end of a period most notable for citizenship's expansion, Rio's poor still found themselves akin to illegal immigrants in their own land, negotiating important components of their lives outside of the boundaries and protections of laws and rights, their vulnerability increasingly critical to important networks of profit and political power. In exploring this process, Brodwyn Fischer offers a critical re-interpretation not only of Brazil's Vargas regime, but also of Rio's twentieth-century urban history and of the broader significance of law, rights, and informality in the lives of the very poor. Brodwyn Fischer is Associate Professor of History at Northwestern University. "Few . . . have examined those excluded from the populist bargain in as sophisticated a way as Brodwyn Fisher does in her analysis of 'the connections between law, poverty and citizenship' in Brazil's then-capital of Rio de Janeiro."—Hendrik Kraay, H-Net Reviews "Brodwyn Fischer's book will occupy a significant place at the intersection of studies of modern urban design patronage, and citizenship in Latin America."—Pablo Piccato, American Historical Review "Dr. Brodwyn Fischer has written a richly researched and innovative account of the 'impossibly paradoxical historical relationship between Rio de Janeiro's urban poor and the rule of law,' with a focus on 'the degree to which hope has coexisted with cynicism and the use of laws and rights has expanded in lockstep with vital informalities'. It is an exquisitely detailed and carefully crafted monograph that advances our understanding of key aspects of Brazil's urban life, law, and politics while shedding light on the discourses and practices of the 'frustratingly vague and heterogeneous social group' designated as the urban poor, the informal sectors, or the 'povčo' (the really 'common people')."—SOCIAL HISTORY "One-sixth of humanity now lives in urban slums, and A Poverty of Rights offers pioneering insights into the political dimensions of urban poverty in Brazil and Latin America. Focusing on the political struggles of Rio's favelados, Fischer shows how slum dwellers' rising political consciousness motivated them to challenge their exclusion from formal politics. Their struggles resulted in conquests in both civic and property rights, despite the staying power of clientelism in Brazil's capital city."—Joseph L. Love, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign "A Poverty of Rights tackles an elusive topic whose importance is difficult to exaggerate. Fischer confronts the subject in an intellectually honest way, and her research is astonishing in both breadth and depth. Her dialectical approach, expressed in the axiom that 'rights poverty emerged as a compromise rather than a defeat,' illuminates the subject matter as no binary approach could."—José C. Moya, University of California, Los Angeles and Barnard College 
Price: 68.88 USD
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13 FISCHER, BRODWYN. A Poverty Of Rights: Citizenship And Inequality In Twentieth-century Rio De Janeiro.
Stanford University Press, Stanford: 2011. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
A Poverty of Rights is an investigation of the knotty ties between citizenship and inequality during the years when the legal and institutional bases for modern Brazilian citizenship originated. Between 1930 and 1964, Brazilian law dramatically extended its range and power, and citizenship began to signify real political, economic, and civil rights for common people. And yet, even in Rio de Janeiro—Brazil's national capital until 1960—this process did not include everyone. Rio's poorest residents sought with hope, imagination, and will to claim myriad forms of citizenship as their own. Yet, blocked by bureaucratic obstacles or ignored by unrealistic laws, they found that their poverty remained one of rights as well as resources. At the end of a period most notable for citizenship's expansion, Rio's poor still found themselves akin to illegal immigrants in their own land, negotiating important components of their lives outside of the boundaries and protections of laws and rights, their vulnerability increasingly critical to important networks of profit and political power. In exploring this process, Brodwyn Fischer offers a critical re-interpretation not only of Brazil's Vargas regime, but also of Rio's twentieth-century urban history and of the broader significance of law, rights, and informality in the lives of the very poor. Brodwyn Fischer is Associate Professor of History at Northwestern University. "Few . . . have examined those excluded from the populist bargain in as sophisticated a way as Brodwyn Fisher does in her analysis of 'the connections between law, poverty and citizenship' in Brazil's then-capital of Rio de Janeiro."—Hendrik Kraay, H-Net Reviews "Brodwyn Fischer's book will occupy a significant place at the intersection of studies of modern urban design patronage, and citizenship in Latin America."—Pablo Piccato, American Historical Review "Dr. Brodwyn Fischer has written a richly researched and innovative account of the 'impossibly paradoxical historical relationship between Rio de Janeiro's urban poor and the rule of law,' with a focus on 'the degree to which hope has coexisted with cynicism and the use of laws and rights has expanded in lockstep with vital informalities'. It is an exquisitely detailed and carefully crafted monograph that advances our understanding of key aspects of Brazil's urban life, law, and politics while shedding light on the discourses and practices of the 'frustratingly vague and heterogeneous social group' designated as the urban poor, the informal sectors, or the 'povčo' (the really 'common people')."—SOCIAL HISTORY "One-sixth of humanity now lives in urban slums, and A Poverty of Rights offers pioneering insights into the political dimensions of urban poverty in Brazil and Latin America. Focusing on the political struggles of Rio's favelados, Fischer shows how slum dwellers' rising political consciousness motivated them to challenge their exclusion from formal politics. Their struggles resulted in conquests in both civic and property rights, despite the staying power of clientelism in Brazil's capital city."—Joseph L. Love, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign "A Poverty of Rights tackles an elusive topic whose importance is difficult to exaggerate. Fischer confronts the subject in an intellectually honest way, and her research is astonishing in both breadth and depth. Her dialectical approach, expressed in the axiom that 'rights poverty emerged as a compromise rather than a defeat,' illuminates the subject matter as no binary approach could."—José C. Moya, University of California, Los Angeles and Barnard College 
Price: 23.94 USD
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14 FISCHER, BRODWYN. A Poverty Of Rights: Citizenship And Inequality In Twentieth-century Rio De Janeiro.
Stanford University Press, Stanford: 2011. h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Very good condition. 
A Poverty of Rights is an investigation of the knotty ties between citizenship and inequality during the years when the legal and institutional bases for modern Brazilian citizenship originated. Between 1930 and 1964, Brazilian law dramatically extended its range and power, and citizenship began to signify real political, economic, and civil rights for common people. And yet, even in Rio de Janeiro—Brazil's national capital until 1960—this process did not include everyone. Rio's poorest residents sought with hope, imagination, and will to claim myriad forms of citizenship as their own. Yet, blocked by bureaucratic obstacles or ignored by unrealistic laws, they found that their poverty remained one of rights as well as resources. At the end of a period most notable for citizenship's expansion, Rio's poor still found themselves akin to illegal immigrants in their own land, negotiating important components of their lives outside of the boundaries and protections of laws and rights, their vulnerability increasingly critical to important networks of profit and political power. In exploring this process, Brodwyn Fischer offers a critical re-interpretation not only of Brazil's Vargas regime, but also of Rio's twentieth-century urban history and of the broader significance of law, rights, and informality in the lives of the very poor. Brodwyn Fischer is Associate Professor of History at Northwestern University. "Few . . . have examined those excluded from the populist bargain in as sophisticated a way as Brodwyn Fisher does in her analysis of 'the connections between law, poverty and citizenship' in Brazil's then-capital of Rio de Janeiro."—Hendrik Kraay, H-Net Reviews "Brodwyn Fischer's book will occupy a significant place at the intersection of studies of modern urban design patronage, and citizenship in Latin America."—Pablo Piccato, American Historical Review "Dr. Brodwyn Fischer has written a richly researched and innovative account of the 'impossibly paradoxical historical relationship between Rio de Janeiro's urban poor and the rule of law,' with a focus on 'the degree to which hope has coexisted with cynicism and the use of laws and rights has expanded in lockstep with vital informalities'. It is an exquisitely detailed and carefully crafted monograph that advances our understanding of key aspects of Brazil's urban life, law, and politics while shedding light on the discourses and practices of the 'frustratingly vague and heterogeneous social group' designated as the urban poor, the informal sectors, or the 'povčo' (the really 'common people')."—SOCIAL HISTORY "One-sixth of humanity now lives in urban slums, and A Poverty of Rights offers pioneering insights into the political dimensions of urban poverty in Brazil and Latin America. Focusing on the political struggles of Rio's favelados, Fischer shows how slum dwellers' rising political consciousness motivated them to challenge their exclusion from formal politics. Their struggles resulted in conquests in both civic and property rights, despite the staying power of clientelism in Brazil's capital city."—Joseph L. Love, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign "A Poverty of Rights tackles an elusive topic whose importance is difficult to exaggerate. Fischer confronts the subject in an intellectually honest way, and her research is astonishing in both breadth and depth. Her dialectical approach, expressed in the axiom that 'rights poverty emerged as a compromise rather than a defeat,' illuminates the subject matter as no binary approach could."—José C. Moya, University of California, Los Angeles and Barnard College 
Price: 23.70 USD
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15 GAUTHEROT, MARCEL; DE ARRUDA, ORONCIO VAZ (TEXT). Sao Paulo.
Wilhelm Andermann Verlag, Munich: 1966. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 

Price: 46.79 USD
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16 GAUTHEROT, MARCEL; KNOX, JOHN AND FRANCE (INTRODUCTION). Rio De Janeiro.
Wilhelm Andermann Verlag, Munich: 1965. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 

Price: 46.55 USD
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17 HAMBLOCH, ERNEST. His Majesty The President Of Brazil: A Study Of Constitutional Brazil.
E. P. Dutton and Co., New York: 1936. First Edition. h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Fair condition. Cover has slight chips and scratches. Scorched spine. 
The following pages are an attempt to examine some aspects of the operation of the presidentialist regime in its direct bearing on social and economic life, with special reference to Brazil. Includes an Index. 
Price: 55.58 USD
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18 HIPPOCRENE BOOKS. Brazilian Portuguese - English / English - Brazilian Children's Picture Dictionary.
Hippocrene Books, New York: 0781811317 / 9780781811316 s Softcover. Brand new book. 
This new dictionary makes learning vocabulary in Brazilian Portuguese at an early age easier and more enjoyable than ever! * Designed to be a child's very first foreign language dictionary for ages 5-10. * 500 entries, each accompanied by a large illustration. * The book design allows a young child to focus on each word and picture and make the connection between them. * Each entry features the word in English and its Brazilian Portuguese equivalent, along with commonsense phonetic pronunciation. * Entries include people, animals, colors, numbers and objects that children encounter and use every day. 
Price: 14.20 USD
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19 MARQUES, AMADEU. Brazilian Portuguese- English/ English- Brazilian Portuguese Concise Dictionary.
Hippocrene Books, New York: 0781812399 / 9780781812399 s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Brazilian Portuguese is written and spoken by over 180 million inhabitants of Brazil and around world, including over 1 million Brazilian Americans. Portuguese is taught at more than 280 colleges and universities in the United States. Portable and concise, this is the perfect Brazilian Portuguese reference for businesspeople, travelers, and students. Brazil is the most popular tourist destination in South America, enjoying over 5 million visitors in 2008. It is also the second largest economy in the Americas (after the United States). This compact dictionary features: * 10,000 essential entries * Each entry includes key grammatical information and pronunciation * Many entries include related words and phrases * Spelling updated in full accordance with the Reforma Ortográfica da Lingua Portuguesa, 2009 
Price: 14.44 USD
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20 PERLMAN, JANICE. Favela: Four Decades Of Living On The Edge In Rio De Janeiro.
Oxford University Press, New York/Oxford/London: 2011. 0199836833 / 9780199836833 s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Janice Perlman wrote the first in-depth account of life in the favelas, a book hailed as one of the most important works in global urban studies in the last 30 years. Now, in Favela, Perlman carries that story forward to the present. Re-interviewing many longtime favela residents whom she had first met in 1969--as well as their children and grandchildren--Perlman offers the only long-term perspective available on the favelados as they struggle for a better life. Perlman discovers that while educational levels have risen, democracy has replaced dictatorship, and material conditions have improved, many residents feel more marginalized than ever. The greatest change is the explosion of drug and arms trade and the high incidence of fatal violence that has resulted. Yet the greatest challenge of all is job creation--decent work for decent pay. If unemployment and under-paid employment are not addressed, she argues, all other efforts will fail to resolve the fundamental issues. Foreign Affairs praised Perlman for writing "with compassion, artistry, and intelligence, using stirring personal stories to illustrate larger points substantiated with statistical analysis." Features * The book which this builds on, The Myth of Marginality, is one of the most important books in global urban studies in the past 30 years * Includes a Foreword by Fernando Henrique Cardoso, former President of Brazil * The author's argument and research is utterly original, and should have a major impact on the debates surrounding global urbanization and megacities "Perlman has produced an excellent, exhaustive study of life in the 1,020 favelas- squatter settlements in Rio de Janeiro..." - Publishers Weekly Starred Review "Enlightening and exceptional." - Library Journal "Perlman returned repeatedly to the famed slums of Rio de Janeiro to follow four generations of residents over 40 years. She writes with compassion, artistry, and intelligence, using stirring personal stories to illustrate larger points substantiated with statistical analysis." - Foreign Affairs "With a scope that betrays her passion for her subjects, Perlman easily oscillates between narrative and statistical analyses, reporting on touching personal events as well as on larger issues of violence, marginality, and globalization. Perlman is as curious as she is thorough, providing exhaustive research and succeeding in supplying a cohesive and often awing account of the complexities and humanity in Rio's favelas." - The Global Journal "A valuable and vivid study of life as it has been lived by the poor in one of Latin America's biggest cities." - Times Literary Supplement "Janice Perlman is one of the leading researchers on urban marginality, and Favela is an exceptional analysis of the evolution of several originally informal settlement over four decades. I highly recommend it as reading for students, urban practitioners, and policy makers." - Manuel Castells, author of The Information Age "Janice Perlman has written a moving account of her experience over four decades studying, living and working in three of Rio's favelas. This work will appeal to academics--it is full of fine analytical work, as well as to the reader who is concerned with understanding poverty and social justice and how millions in Brazil are trapped by their environment, lack of education and now by crime and violence. While the location of this work is Rio, the lessons and challenges of poverty in big cities is of importance to us all, as the world moves to 2050 when 75% of the population will be in urban areas." - James D. Wolfensohn, Former President, The World Bank Janice Perlman is President and Founder of the Mega-Cities Project. She is also the author of The Myth of Marginality: Urban Poverty and Politics in Rio de Janeiro, which won the C. Wright Mills Award. She lives in Nyack, New York. 
Price: 20.85 USD
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