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PUBLIC POLICY.

PUBLIC POLICY.

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1 BOK, DEREK. The Politics Of Happiness: What Government Can Learn From The New Research On Well-being.
Princeton University Press, Princeton: 2010. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
During the past forty years, thousands of studies have been carried out on the subject of happiness. Some have explored the levels of happiness or dissatisfaction associated with typical daily activities, such as working, seeing friends, or doing household chores. Others have tried to determine the extent to which income, family, religion, and other factors are associated with the satisfaction people feel about their lives. The Gallup organization has begun conducting global surveys of happiness, and several countries are considering publishing periodic reports on the growth or decline of happiness among their people. One nation, tiny Bhutan, has actually made "Gross National Happiness" the central aim of its domestic policy. How might happiness research affect government policy in the United States - and beyond? In The Politics of Happiness, former Harvard president Derek Bok examines how governments could use happiness research in a variety of policy areas to increase well-being and improve the quality of life for all their citizens. Bok first describes the principal findings of happiness researchers. He considers how reliable the results appear to be and whether they deserve to be taken into account in devising government policies. Recognizing both the strengths and weaknesses of happiness research, Bok looks at the policy implications for economic growth, equality, retirement, unemployment, health care, mental illness, family programs, education, and government quality, among other subjects. Timely and incisive, The Politics of Happiness sheds light on what makes people happy and the vital role government policy could play in fostering satisfaction and well-being. Derek Bok is the 300th Anniversary Research Professor at Harvard University. From 1971 to 1991, he served as Harvard's twenty-fifth president, and served again as interim president from 2006 to 2007. He is the author of The State of the Nation and The Trouble with Government, and coauthor of The Shape of the River (Princeton). "Delving into the burgeoning field of happiness research, former president of Harvard University Bok (The State of the Nation) sifts through scientific studies on how societal well-being indications can and should be used to shape social and political policy. . . . Bok's arguments on how good government, access to education, and adequate child care make for a pleasanter society are incontrovertible, and he initiates an important, jargon-free discussion of American public policy, especially when its aims contradict or diminish the public weal." - Publisher's Weekly "[Bok asks] whether governments should really try to maker their citizens happier. Answer: yes, not through promoting economic growth, but through environmental policies, healthcare, and strengthening marriage and the family."--Glenda Cooper, Prospect Magazine "[A] sweeping study of behavioral research and public policy. . . . This is a book that leaders of developing nations obsessed with economic growth will find puzzling and troubling, but not as much as market economists will."--Stephen Matchett, The Australian "Okay, I hear your protests, your gut telling you that Bok is a naēve professor with his head in the clouds. Skeptical myself, I found his book full of surprises. Example: The growing inequality of incomes in the United States has not made Americans more dissatisfied than in previous times. Only one group is upset by this growing disparity - wealthy Americans! See what I mean? Counterintuitive conclusions, like this one, abound." - Mandy Twaddell, Providence Journal "Relatively light and accessible. . . . Although Bok is partisan, his is a good introduction to the subject. He accurately outlines the findings of the research while questioning its shortcomings."--Daniel Ben-Ami, Spiked Review of Books 
Price: 23.47 USD
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2 GAYLIN, WILLARD; GLASSER, IRA; MARCUS, STEVEN & ROTHMAN, DAVID. Doing Good: The Limits Of Benevolence.
Pantheon Books, New York: 1978. 039473372X / 9780394733722 First Edition. s Softcover. Good condition. 
Do our efforts at help all too often become coercive? What happens when the state assumes the role of a parent? Are there ways by which we can at once protect the rights and yet meet the needs of the dependent? These are questions that are analyzed in this fascinating book by a very unorthodox quartet: a psychoanalyst, a specialist on nineteenth-century English literature, a social historian, and the head of the New York City Civil Liberties Union. 
Price: 4.70 USD
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3 GORDON, KERMIT (EDITOR). Agenda For The Nation.
The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC: 1968. First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good clean copy. 
Eighteen of the nation's leading observers of public affairs present a set of penetrating and authoritative essays clarifying major domestic and foreign policy issues and weighing alternative courses of action. 
Price: 4.99 USD
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4 HING, BILL ONG. To Be An American: Cultural Pluralism And The Rhetoric Of Assimilation.
New York University Press, New York: 1997. 0814735231 / 9780814735237 First edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Very good condition there is some neat highlighting. 
Considers immigration in the contect of the global economy, and hard facts about downsizing, employment, and job loss. Considers the impact of the United States' increasingly multicultural society on what it means to be an American. Includes an Index. 
Price: 32.54 USD
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5 LIPPMAN, WALTER; NEVINS, ALLAN (SELECTED & EDITED BY). Interpretations 1931 - 1932.
The Macmillan Company, New York: 1932. Reprint Edition. h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Very good condition considering its age. 
Contains articles entitled The Depression in the United States: Causes and Nature; Special Problems of the Depression; Mr. Hoover: His Task and How He Dealt With It; Congress: Its Task and How It Dealt With It; America, The War Debts, and European Depression; The Crisis in the Far Est: American Policy; The Political Scene in Europe; Tammany, Mr. Seabury, and New York City; The Approach of the National Conventions; The Two National Conventions and Their Work; and The Social Scene; Personalities of the Day. Includes an Index. 
Price: 109.24 USD
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6 MCGIRR, LISA. The War On Alcohol: Prohibition And The Rise Of The American State.
W. W. Norton, New York: 2016. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Prohibition has long been portrayed as a "noble experiment" that failed, a newsreel story of glamorous gangsters, flappers, and speakeasies. Now at last Lisa McGirr dismantles this cherished myth to reveal a much more significant history. Prohibition was the seedbed for a pivotal expansion of the federal government, the genesis of our contemporary penal state. Her deeply researched, eye-opening account uncovers patterns of enforcement still familiar today: the war on alcohol was waged disproportionately in African American, immigrant, and poor white communities. Alongside Jim Crow and other discriminatory laws, Prohibition brought coercion into everyday life and even into private homes. Its targets coalesced into an electoral base of urban, working-class voters that propelled FDR to the White House. This outstanding history also reveals a new genome for the activist American state, one that shows the DNA of the right as well as the left. It was Herbert Hoover who built the extensive penal apparatus used by the federal government to combat the crime spawned by Prohibition. The subsequent federal wars on crime, on drugs, and on terror all display the inheritances of the war on alcohol. McGirr shows the powerful American state to be a bipartisan creation, a legacy not only of the New Deal and the Great Society but also of Prohibition and its progeny. The War on Alcohol is history at its best—original, authoritative, and illuminating of our past and its continuing presence today. Lisa McGirr is professor of history at Harvard University. She is the author of The War on Alcohol and an award-winning history of the new right, Suburban Warriors. She and her family live in Cambridge, Massachusetts. "[This] fine history of Prohibition . . . could have a major impact on how we read American political history."—James A. Morone, New York Times Book Review "McGirr's important new book . . . leaves us with a Prohibition that looks less like an anomaly than an eerily prescient rehearsal for the current national war on drugs." — John Fabian Witt, Wall Street Journal "In [McGirr's] view, Prohibition was not a farce but a tragedy, and one that has made a substantial contribution to our current miseries. Nearly a century later . . . the legacy of Prohibition can be seen in our prisons, teeming with people convicted of violating neo-Prohibitionary drug laws. Many at the time viewed Prohibition as an outrage, and, in McGirr's view, we are missing its true meaning if we are not outraged, too—and ready to resist its equally oppressive descendants." — Kelefa Sanneh, The New Yorker "McGirr's book pivots from being a very good, tightly focused history of Prohibition to a great history of broader American politics, one that connects to contemporary issues in a profound way." — Bill Savage, Chicago Tribune "In this remarkable book, Lisa McGirr transforms our understanding of Prohibition and its legacy. Moving beyond familiar tales of speakeasies and gangland violence, she shows how this episode contributed to the expansion of the authority of the modern American state and the origins of mass imprisonment. No history could be more timely." — Eric Foner, author of Gateway to Freedom "McGirr's book, fascinating and deeply researched, offers a startlingly fresh argument for why so many of our current problems—from the war on drugs to mass incarceration—grow out of Prohibition. Anyone who wants to understand the 1920s, 1930s, and 2000s should read this book." — Jonathan Alter, author of The Defining Moment "This is not just the best book ever written about the era of Prohibition; it is a landmark history of modern America. With splendid insight and illuminating details, Lisa McGirr demonstrates that the war on alcohol was the health of the state." — Michael Kazin, author of American Dreamers "In her revelatory new book, Lisa McGirr moves Prohibition from the gin-soaked edges of the Roaring Twenties to the heart of the American state." — Kevin Boyle, author of Arc of Justice "[A] fascinating account of Prohibition and its consequences, written with verve, depth, and imagination." — Ira Katznelson, author of Fear Itself "Lisa McGirr has given us an admirably fresh look at a supposedly shopworn subject. She convincingly demonstrates that the Prohibition era deserves to be taken seriously as the nursery of many stubbornly persistent practices, including a moralizing, meddlesome state that targets its punitive powers on the least-advantaged citizens." — David M. Kennedy, author of Freedom from Fear 
Price: 17.05 USD
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7 NAKAMURA, ROBERT T. AND SMALLWOOD, FRANK. The Politics Of Policy Implementation.
St. Martin's Press, New York: 1980. 0312627807 / 9780312627805 First Edition. s Softcover. Good condition. 
Represents an attempt to integrate case study literature on public policy implementation into a more general conceptual framework. Includes an Index. 
Price: 33.73 USD
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8 RAPHAEL, JODY. Saving Bernice: Battered Women, Welfare, And Poverty.
University Press of New England, Lebanon: 2000. 1555534384 / 9781555534387 s Softcover. Brand new book. 
This is the story of Bernice, a former welfare mother and survivor of domestic violence, and her arduous journey to escape from, and ultimately triumph over, years of battering, poverty, and welfare. Skillfully interweaving Bernice's own eloquent words about her harrowing abuse with descriptions of other women's similar experiences and a rich synthesis of statistical findings, Jody Raphael demonstrates convincingly that domestic violence and dependence on public assistance are intricately linked. In a work that is sure to stir controversy, she challenges traditional views and stereotypes (conservative and liberal) about welfare recipients, arguing that many poor women are neither lazy nor paralyzed by a "culture of poverty," but instead are trapped by their batterers. Bernice's ordeals at the hands of her abusive partner - brutal beatings, violent rapes, threats on her life, stalking, blocked access to birth control, and sabotage of efforts to find a job - resonate throughout the work. The experiences she relates provide crucial insights into the welfare system and illuminate its failures, successes, and potential in helping women like her. This disquieting yet inspiring book puts a human face on the heated public policy debate over welfare reform. Above all, it is Bernice's life story and, through her voice, the story of countless other battered women who are isolated in poverty and welfare by the power and control of their abusers. "A must-read for everyone who wishes to end not just welfare, but poverty 'as we know it." - Patricia Ireland 
Price: 23.70 USD
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