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MILITARY HISTORY.

MILITARY HISTORY.

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1 BLACKSHEAR, JAMES BAILEY. Fort Bascom: Soldiers, Comancheros, And Indians In The Canadian River Valley.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2016. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Motorists traveling along State Highway 104 north of Tucumcari, New Mexico, may notice a sign indicating the location of Fort Bascom. The post itself is long gone, its adobe walls washed away. In 1863, the United States, fearing a second Confederate invasion of New Mexico Territory from Texas, built Fort Bascom. Until 1874, the troops stationed at this site on the Eroded Plains along the Canadian River defended Hispanic and Anglo-American settlements in eastern New Mexico and far western Texas against Comanches and other Southern Plains Indians. In Fort Bascom, James Bailey Blackshear presents the definitive history of this critical outpost in the American Southwest, along with a detailed view of army life on the late-nineteenth-century western frontier. Located in the middle of what General William T. Sherman called "an awful country," Fort Bascom's hardships went beyond the army's efforts to control the Comanches and Kiowas. Blackshear shows the difficulties of maintaining a post in a harsh environment where scarce water and forage, long supply lines, poorly constructed facilities, and monotonous duty tested soldiers' endurance. Fort Bascom also describes the social aspects of a frontier assignment and the impact of the Comanchero trade on military personnel and objectives, showing just how difficult it was for the army to subdue the Southern Plains Indians. Crucial to this enterprise were logistics, including procurement from civilian contractors of everything from beef to hay. Blackshear examines the strong links between New Mexican Comancheros and Comanches, detailing how the lure of illegal profits drew ex-military personnel into this black-market economy and revealing the influence of the Comanchero trade on Southwestern history. This first full account of the unique challenges soldiers faced on the Texas frontier during and after the Civil War restores Fort Bascom to its rightful place in the history of the U.S. military and of U.S.-Indian relations in the American Southwest. 11 black and white Illustrations, 4 maps, 2 tables, 272 pages, 6" x 9". 
Price: 28.45 USD
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2 BOSCAWEN, HUGH. The Capture Of Louisbourg, 1758.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2011. Volume 27 in Campaigns & Commanders. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
A comprehensive account of the pivotal battle of the Seven Years' War. Louisbourg, France's impressive fortress on Cape Breton Island's foggy Atlantic coast, dominated access to the St. Lawrence and colonial New France for forty years in the mid-eighteenth century. In 1755, Great Britain and France stumbled into the French and Indian War, part of what (to Europe) became the Seven Years' War—only for British forces to suffer successive defeats. In 1758, Britain and France, as well as Indian nations caught in the rivalry, fought for high stakes: the future of colonial America. Hugh Boscawen describes how Britain's war minister William Pitt launched four fleets in a coordinated campaign to prevent France from reinforcing Louisbourg. As the author shows, the Royal Navy outfought its opponents before General Jeffery Amherst and Brigadier James Wolfe successfully led 14,000 British regulars, including American-born redcoats, rangers, and carpenters, in a hard-fought assault landing. Together they besieged the fortress, which surrendered after forty-nine days. The victory marked a turning point in British fortunes and precipitated the end of French rule in North America. Boscawen, an experienced soldier and sailor, and a direct descendant of Admiral the Hon. Edward Boscawen, who commanded the Royal Navy fleet at Louisbourg, examines the pivotal 1758 Louisbourg campaign from both the British and French perspectives. Drawing on myriad primary sources, including previously unpublished correspondence, Boscawen also answers the question "What did the soldiers and sailors who fought there do all day?" The result is the most comprehensive history of this strategically important campaign ever written. Colonel Hugh Boscawen served thirty-two years in the Coldstream Guards, with operational service in three theaters, including Op DESERT STORM, before leaving the British Army in 2009. An eighteenth-century naval and military specialist, and a yachtsman, he has contributed to British military doctrine and to various regimental histories and journals. 
Price: 25.60 USD
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3 CHURCHILL, WINSTON S. The River War: An Account Of The Reconquest Of The Sudan.
Carroll & Graf Publishers, New York: 2000. 0786707518 / 9780786707515 First Carroll & Graf Edition. s Softcover. Very good condition. 
From the young Winston Churchill, in his first major historical work, the stirring and authoritative account of the Anglo-Egyptian reconquest of Sudan. In this illuminating volume Churchill not only dramatically relates the catastrophic events in the Sudan's 1880s but also places them in the context of Sudanese history. Includes an Index. 
Price: 42.28 USD
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4 CLANCY, TOM WITH GENERAL TONY ZINNI (RET.) AND TONY KOLTZ. Battle Ready.
G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York: 2004. First Printing. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Very good condition. 
Follows the evolution of both General Zinni and the United States Marine Corps, from the revolution of the 1970s and 1980s, to the new realities of the post-Cold War, post-9/11 military--a military with a radically deifferent job and radically different tools for accomplishing it. It is an eye-opening book-- a front-row seat to a man, an institution, and a way both of war and peace that together make this an instant classic of military history. Includes an Index. 
Price: 6.60 USD
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5 CUBBISON, DOUGLAS R. All Canada In The Hands Of The British: General Jeffery Amherst And The 1760 Campaign To Conquer New France.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2014. Volume 43 in Campaigns & Commanders. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The full story of the successful sieges of Montreal that ended France's control of Canada In 1760, General Jeffery Amherst led the British campaign that captured Montreal and began the end of French colonial rule in North America. All Canada in the Hands of the British is a detailed account of Amherst's successful military strategy and soldiers' experiences on both sides. Newly promoted general Jeffery Amherst took command of British forces in North America in 1759 and soon secured victories at Fort Duquesne, Louisbourg, Quebec, Fort Ticonderoga, and Niagara. In 1760 William Pitt, head of the British government, commanded Amherst to eliminate French rule in Canada. During the ensuing campaign, Amherst confronted French resurgence at Quebec and mounted sieges at Isle aux Noix and Fort Lévis, both of which were made difficult by French strategic placements on nearby islands. As historian Douglas R. Cubbison demonstrates, however, Amherst was well before his time in strategy and tactics, and his forces crushed French resistance. In this first book-length study of Amherst's campaign, Cubbison examines the three principal columns that Amherst's army comprised, only one of which was under his direct command. Cubbison argues that Amherst's success against the French relied on his employment of command, control, communications, and intelligence. Cubbison also shows how well Brigadier General James Murray's use of what is today called population-centric counterinsurgency corresponded with Amherst's strategic oversight and victory. Using archival materials, archaeological evidence, and the firsthand accounts of junior provincial soldiers, Cubbison takes us from the eighteenth-century antagonisms between the British and French in the New World through the Seven Years' War, to the final siege and its historic significance for colonial Canada. In one of the most decisive victories of the Seven Years' War, Amherst was able, after a mere four weeks, to claim all of Canada. All Canada in the Hands of the British will change how military historians and enthusiasts understand the nature of British colonial battle strategy. 12 black and whire Illustrations, 2 figures, 3 maps. Douglas R. Cubbison, a former U.S. Army Field Artillery Officer and Command Historian, is curator of the Wyoming Veterans' Memorial Museum in Casper and author of The American Northern Theater Army in 1776: The Ruin and Reconstruction of the Continental Force and Burgoyne and the Saratoga Campaign: His Papers. 
Price: 18.95 USD
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6 CUBBISON, DOUGLAS R. All Canada In The Hands Of The British: General Jeffery Amherst And The 1760 Campaign To Conquer New France.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2014. Volume 43 in Campaigns & Commanders. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
The full story of the successful sieges of Montreal that ended France's control of Canada In 1760, General Jeffery Amherst led the British campaign that captured Montreal and began the end of French colonial rule in North America. All Canada in the Hands of the British is a detailed account of Amherst's successful military strategy and soldiers' experiences on both sides. Newly promoted general Jeffery Amherst took command of British forces in North America in 1759 and soon secured victories at Fort Duquesne, Louisbourg, Quebec, Fort Ticonderoga, and Niagara. In 1760 William Pitt, head of the British government, commanded Amherst to eliminate French rule in Canada. During the ensuing campaign, Amherst confronted French resurgence at Quebec and mounted sieges at Isle aux Noix and Fort Lévis, both of which were made difficult by French strategic placements on nearby islands. As historian Douglas R. Cubbison demonstrates, however, Amherst was well before his time in strategy and tactics, and his forces crushed French resistance. In this first book-length study of Amherst's campaign, Cubbison examines the three principal columns that Amherst's army comprised, only one of which was under his direct command. Cubbison argues that Amherst's success against the French relied on his employment of command, control, communications, and intelligence. Cubbison also shows how well Brigadier General James Murray's use of what is today called population-centric counterinsurgency corresponded with Amherst's strategic oversight and victory. Using archival materials, archaeological evidence, and the firsthand accounts of junior provincial soldiers, Cubbison takes us from the eighteenth-century antagonisms between the British and French in the New World through the Seven Years' War, to the final siege and its historic significance for colonial Canada. In one of the most decisive victories of the Seven Years' War, Amherst was able, after a mere four weeks, to claim all of Canada. All Canada in the Hands of the British will change how military historians and enthusiasts understand the nature of British colonial battle strategy. 12 black and whire Illustrations, 2 figures, 3 maps. Douglas R. Cubbison, a former U.S. Army Field Artillery Officer and Command Historian, is curator of the Wyoming Veterans' Memorial Museum in Casper and author of The American Northern Theater Army in 1776: The Ruin and Reconstruction of the Continental Force and Burgoyne and the Saratoga Campaign: His Papers. 
Price: 33.20 USD
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7 CUCCIA, PHILLIP R. Napoleon In Italy: The Sieges Of Mantua, 1796-1799.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2014. Volume 44 in Campaigns & Commanders. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Eighteenth-century political and social issues entwine in this deeply researched campaign study. In the center of Mantua, in northern Italy, a covered bridge stretches over the narrow Rio where vendors sell fish from pushcarts just as locals did more than two hundred years ago when Napoleon Bonaparte laid siege to the city. Four cannon balls protruding out of an adjacent wall offer a tacit monument to the sufferings of townspeople during the 1796-1797 siege, when the city, held by Austrian troops, finally fell under French control. Two years later, Mantua was again barraged, this time by a combined Austrian and Russian army, which took it back after four months. In Napoleon in Italy, Phillip R. Cuccia brings to light two understudied aspects of these trying periods in Mantua's history: siege warfare and the conditions it created inside the city. Drawing on underutilized military records in Austrian, French, and Italian archives, Cuccia delves into these important conflicts to integrate political and social issues with a campaign study. Unlike other military histories of the era, Napoleon in Italy brings to light the words of soldiers, leaders, and citizens who experienced the sieges firsthand. Cuccia also shows how the sieges had consequences long after they were over. The surrender and proposed court-martial of Franćois-Philippe de Foissac-Latour, the French general in charge of Mantua in 1799, sheds new light on Napoleon's disdain for defeat. Foissac-Latour faced Napoleon's ire, expulsion from the army, and harsh public criticism. Napoleon in Italy is not only the story of Mantua's strategic importance. Mantua also symbolized Napoleon's voracious determination to win and Austria's desperation to retain its possessions. By placing the sieges of Mantua in an eighteenth-century international context, Cuccia introduces readers to a broader understanding of siege warfare and of how the global impacts the local. 4 black and white Illustrations, 1 chart, 1 table, 7 maps. Phillip R. Cuccia is a colonel in the U.S. Army serving as a foreign area officer for Europe. He taught history at West Point and is the author of numerous articles on the Napoleonic era and the American Civil War. "Drawing on research in French, Austrian, private, and numerous Italian archives, Colonel Cuccia's authoritative study of the sieges of Mantua during Napoleon's conquest of Italy will be the standard work on the subject for decades. The author's firsthand knowledge of the terrain, exhaustive research, and military background have enabled him to produce the definitive work on a well-known but little-studied aspect of the Napoleonic Wars."—Michael V. Leggiere, author of The Fall of Napoleon: The Allied Invasion of France, 1813-1814 
Price: 31.30 USD
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8 ELLSBERG, COMMANDER EDWARD. On The Bottom.
New American Library, New York: 2004. 0451211510 / 9780451211514 First New American Library Printing. s Softcover. Good condition. 
In a collision with the steamship City of Rome on the night of September 25, 1925, the U.S. submarine S-51 sank in 132 feet of water near Block Island-taking thirty-three sailors to the ocean floor. The disaster stirred such a strong public reaction that Navy brass made the decision to attempt the impossible-to raise the thousand-ton sub from the bottom of the sea. Includes an Index. 
Price: 10.93 USD
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9 EMMETT, CHRIS. Fort Union And The Winning Of The Southwest.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2016. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Few casual readers of American history are aware of Fort Union, New Mexico, and its history. Many would probably confuse it with another Fort Union on the headwaters of the Missouri—also important, but not as vital to the history of the West as the Fort Union near Las Vegas, New Mexico. It was inevitable that the United States would dominate the Southwest. The military was used to achieve this goal, and the story of military operations in the Southwest is centered on Fort Union. Founded in 1851, the fort was the supply post and focal point for dealing with the Spanish and Indian populations in New Mexico Territory until it was abandoned in 1891. During the Civil War, Fort Union was the final Confederate objective in their advance into New Mexico. Confederate General Henry H. Sibley had supervised the construction of its arsenal some years earlier and was determined to capture its great store of military supplies. Moreover, its conquest would put the Confederates a step nearer to the gold mines in Colorado. But the Battle of Glorieta Pass put an end to such ambitions, and Fort Union remained a stronghold for the Union Army in the Western territories. After the Civil War, the fort was charged with maintaining peace among the Indian tribes of the area until its detachment was transferred to Fort Wingate in 1891. Declared a National Monument in 1954, the remains of Fort Union are now under the care of the National Park Service. 
Price: 18.95 USD
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10 ENGBERG-PEDERSEN, ANDERS. Empire Of Chance: The Napoleonic Wars And The Disorder Of Things.
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts and London England: 2015. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Napoleon's campaigns were the most complex military undertakings in history before the nineteenth century. But the defining battles of Austerlitz, Borodino, and Waterloo changed more than the nature of warfare. Concepts of chance, contingency, and probability became permanent fixtures in the West's understanding of how the world works. Empire of Chance examines anew the place of war in the history of Western thought, showing how the Napoleonic Wars inspired a new discourse on knowledge. Soldiers returning from the battlefields were forced to reconsider basic questions about what it is possible to know and how decisions are made in a fog of imperfect knowledge. Artists and intellectuals came to see war as embodying modernity itself. The theory of war espoused in Carl von Clausewitz's classic treatise responded to contemporary developments in mathematics and philosophy, and the tools for solving military problems—maps, games, and simulations—became models for how to manage chance. On the other hand, the realist novels of Balzac, Stendhal, and Tolstoy questioned whether chance and contingency could ever be described or controlled. As Anders Engberg-Pedersen makes clear, after Napoleon the state of war no longer appeared exceptional but normative. It became a prism that revealed the underlying operative logic determining the way society is ordered and unfolds. 336 pages, 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches, 30 halftones. Anders Engberg-Pedersen is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature in the Department for the Study of Culture at the University of Southern Denmark. 
Price: 42.75 USD
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11 ESDAILE, CHARLES J. Women In The Peninsular War.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2014. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
In the iconography of the Peninsular War of 1808-14, women are well represented—both as heroines, such as Agustina Zaragosa Domenech, and as victims, whether of starvation or of French brutality. In history, however, with its focus on high politics and military operations, they are invisible—a situation that Charles J. Esdaile seeks to address. In Women in the Peninsular War, Esdaile looks beyond the iconography. While a handful of Spanish and Portuguese women became Agustina-like heroines, a multitude became victims, and here both of these groups receive their due. But Esdaile reveals a much more complicated picture in which women are discovered to have experienced, responded to, and participated in the conflict in various ways. While some women fought or otherwise became involved in the struggle against the invaders, others turned collaborator, used the war as a means of effecting dramatic changes in their situation, or simply concentrated on staying alive. Along with Agustina Zaragoza Domenech, then, we meet French sympathizers, campfollowers, pamphleteers, cross-dressers, prostitutes, amorous party girls, and even a few protofeminists. Esdaile examines many social spheres, ranging from the pampered daughters of the nobility, through the cloistered members of Spain's many convents, to the tough and defiant denizens of the Madrid slums. And we meet not just the women to whom the war came but also the women who came to the war—the many thousands who accompanied the British and French armies to the Iberian peninsula. Thanks to his use of copious original source material, Esdaile rescues one and all from, as E. P. Thompson put it, "the enormous condescension of posterity." And yet all these women remain firmly in their historical and cultural context, a context that Esdaile shows to have emerged from the Peninsular War hardly changed. Hence the subsequent loss of these women's story, and the obscurity from which this book has at long last rescued them. Charles J. Esdaile is Professor in History at the University of Liverpool. His numerous publications include Napoleon's Wars: An International History, The Peninsular War: A New History, and Fighting Napoleon: Guerrillas, Bandits and Adventurers in Spain. 
Price: 37.95 USD
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12 ESTES, KENNETH W. Into The Breach At Pusan: The 1st Provisional Marine Brigade In The Korean War.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2012. Volume 31 in Campaigns & Commanders Series. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
A fresh investigation of the marines' performance at the Pusan Perimeter In the opening campaign of the Korean War, the 1st Provisional Marine Brigade participated in a massive effort by United States and South Korean forces in 1950 to turn back the North Korean invasion of the Republic of Korea. The brigade's actions loom large in marine lore. According to most accounts, traditional Marine Corps discipline, training, and fighting spirit saved the day as the marines rescued an unprepared U.S. 8th Army, which had been pushed back to the "Pusan Perimeter" at the southeastern tip of the Korean peninsula. Historian and retired marine Kenneth W. Estes undertakes a fresh investigation of the marines' and Eighth Army's fight for Pusan. Into the Breach at Pusan corrects discrepancies in earlier works (including the official histories) to offer a detailed account of the campaign and place it in historical context. Drawing on combat records, command reports, and biographical materials, Estes describes the mobilization, organization, and operations of 1st Brigade during the first three months of American participation in the Korean War. Focusing on the battalions, companies, and platoons that faced the hardened soldiers of the North Korean army, he brings the reader directly to the battlefield. The story he reveals there, woven with the voices of soldiers and officers, is one of cooperation rather than interservice rivalry. At the same time, he clarifies differences in the organizational cultures of the U.S. Army and the Marine Corps. Into the Breach at Pusan is scrupulously fair to both the army and the marines. Estes sets the record straight in crediting the 8th Army with saving itself during the Pusan Perimeter campaign, but he also affirms that the army's suffering would have been much greater without the crucial, timely performance of the 1st Provisional Marine Brigade. Kenneth W. Estes, a marine lieutenant colonel who served from 1969 to 1993, is author of Marines under Armor: The Marines and the Armored Fighting Vehicle, 1916-2000 and coauthor of Tanks on the Beaches: A Marine Tanker in the Pacific War. He has edited the Marine Officer's Guide since 1985. 
Price: 28.45 USD
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13 FABER, HAROLD ( EDITED BY). Luftwaffe: A History.
Quadrangle, New York: 1977. h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Good condition. 
This book is a condensation of twelve volumes written by former key officers of the German Air Force for the United States Air Force under wartime pressures in World War II. Includes an Index. 
Price: 10.93 USD
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14 FITZPATRICK, DAVID J. Emory Upton: Misunderstood Reformer.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2017. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Emory Upton (1839-1881) is widely recognized as one of America's most influential military thinkers. His works—The Armies of Asia and Europe and The Military Policy of the United States—fueled the army's intellectual ferment in the late nineteenth century and guided Secretary of War Elihu Root's reforms in the early 1900s. Yet as David J. Fitzpatrick contends, Upton is also widely misunderstood as an antidemocratic militaristic zealot whose ideas were "too Prussian" for America. In this first full biography in nearly half a century, Fitzpatrick, the leading authority on Upton, radically revises our view of this important figure in American military thought. A devout Methodist farm boy from upstate New York, Upton attended the United States Military Academy at West Point and served in the Civil War. His use of a mass infantry attack to break the Confederate lines at Spotsylvania Courthouse in 1864 identified him as a rising figure in the U.S. Army. Upton's subsequent work on military organizations in Asia and Europe, commissioned by Commanding General William T. Sherman, influenced the army's turn toward a European, largely German ideal of soldiering as a profession. Yet it was this same text, along with Upton's Military Policy of the United States, that also propelled the misinterpretations of Upton—first by some contemporaries, and more recently by noted historians Stephen Ambrose and Russell Weigley. By showing Upton's dedication to the ideal of the citizen-soldier and placing him within the context of contemporary military, political, and intellectual discourse, Fitzpatrick shows how Upton's ideas clearly grew out of an American military-political tradition. Emory Upton: Misunderstood Reformer clarifies Upton's influence on the army by offering a new and necessary understanding of the military's intellectual direction at a critical juncture in American history. 15 black-and-white Illustrations, 4 maps, Hardcover. David J. Fitzpatrick is Professor of History at Washtenaw Community College in Ann Arbor, Michigan. His articles have been published in the Journal of Military History. "This superbly researched and entertaining book is a pathbreaking reconsideration of one of America's most influential military intellectuals. David J. Fitzpatrick's study will appeal to all those interested in the Civil War, the U.S. Army, and American military policy."—Brian McAllister Linn, author of Elvis's Army: Cold War GIs and the Atomic Battlefield "David Fitzpatrick successfully challenges traditional interpretations not only of Emory Upton but also of the army's failure to implement substantive reforms following the Civil War. Anyone interested in the development of tactics and American military policy in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries needs to read this book."—Robert Wooster, author of The American Military Frontiers: The United States Army in the West, 1783-1900 
Price: 37.95 USD
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15 FULLER, MAJOR-GENERAL J. F. C. A Military History Of The Western World: From The Defeat Of The Spanish Armada, 1588, To The Battle Of Waterloo, 1815 - Volumes One And Two.
Funk & Wagnalls, New York: 1954. h Hardcovers with dustjackets. Good condition but some wear to the dustjackets. 
Volume 1 covers From the Earliest Times t the Battle of Lepanto, and Volume 2 carries the history of warfare in the Western world from the time of the fateful confrontation of two aggressive maritime powers, Spain and England, to the close of the Napoleonic era. It continues the panoramic sweep and incisive analysis which made the first volume of General Fuller's trilogy a landmark in modern history writing. Includes an Index. "On the strength of the first two volumes, his survey promises to be far and away the foremost military history in its field -- indispensible reading for every educated adult." -- Lyn Montross, The New York Times 
Price: 57.00 USD
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16 GAFF, ALAN D. Bayonets In The Wilderness: Anthony Wayne's Legion In The Old Northwest.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 200. Volume 4 in Campaigns & Commanders Series. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
An authoritative assessment of the U.S. Army's campaign to conquer the Old Northwest. In Bayonets in the Wilderness, Alan D. Gaff explores a long-neglected period in American history to tell the complete story of how the U.S. Army conquered the first American frontier—the Northwest Territory. Wayne's successful campaign led to the creation of a standing army for the country and set the standard for future conflicts and treaties with American Indians. Countering the popular impression of Wayne as "mad," Gaff depicts him as a thoughtful, resolute, and diplomatic officer whose masterfully organized campaign brought an end in 1794 to forty years of border fighting. Gaff's account brings to light alliances between Indian forces and the British military, demonstrating that British troops still conducted operations on American soil long after the supposed end of the American Revolution. Alan D. Gaff is an independent scholar and the author of several books on military history, including Blood in the Argonne: The "Lost Battalion" in World War I, Bayonets in the Wilderness: Anthony Wayne's Legion in the Old Northwest, and On Many a Bloody Field: Four Years in the Iron Brigade. "Alan Gaff's graceful and compelling narrative provides the definitive account of Wayne's Fallen Timbers campaign—a turning point in America's early history."—Paul Andrew Hutton, author of Phil Sheridan and His Army 
Price: 31.54 USD
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17 GLEASON, BRUCE P. Sound The Trumpet, Beat The Drums: Horse-mounted Bands Of The U.s. Army, 1820-1940.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2016. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Stemming from the tradition of rallying troops and frightening enemies, mounted bands played a unique and distinctive role in American military history. Their fascinating story within the U.S. Army unfolds in this latest book from noted music historian and former army musician Bruce P. Gleason. Sound the Trumpet, Beat the Drums follows American horse-mounted bands from the nation's military infancy through its emergence as a world power during World War II and the corresponding shift from horse-powered to mechanized cavalry. Gleason traces these bands to their origins, including the horn-blowing Celtic and Roman cavalries of antiquity and the mounted Middle Eastern musicians whom European Crusaders encountered in the Holy Land. He describes the performance, musical selections, composition, and duties of American mounted bands that have served regular, militia, volunteer, and National Guard regiments in military and civil parades and concerts, in ceremonies, and on the battlefield. Over time the composition of the bands has changed—beginning with trumpets and drums and expanding to full-fledged concert bands on horseback. Woven throughout the book are often-surprising strands of American military history from the War of 1812 through the Civil War, action on the western frontier, and the two world wars. Touching on anthropology, musicology, and the history of the United States and its military, Sound the Trumpet, Beat the Drums gives a thorough and satisfying account of mounted military bands and their cultural significance. 39 black-and-white Illustrations, 1 table, 264 pages, 6.125" x 9.25". Bruce P. Gleason is Associate Professor of Music Education and Music History at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota, and the founding editor of Research and Issues in Music Education. His numerous articles have been published in the Journal of Band Research, Military History Quarterly, National Guard Magazine, the Journal of Historical Research in Music Education, and other journals. "An army without a band was not a real army—at least that's what most nineteenth-century U.S. Army officers believed. The best commanders expended enormous energy and capital to secure musicians for their regimental and post bands. Bruce Gleason's superb history illuminates this little-known but highly significant corner of military history."—Durwood Ball, author of Army Regulars on the Western Frontier, 1848-1861 
Price: 31.30 USD
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18 GORENFELD, WILL & JOHN GORENFELD. Kearny's Dragoons Out West: The Birth Of The U.s. Cavalry.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2016. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Having banished eastern Native peoples to lands west of the Mississippi, President Andrew Jackson's government by 1833 needed a new type of soldier to keep displaced Indians from returning home. And so the 1st Dragoons came into being. Will and John Gorenfeld tell their story—an epic of exploration, conquest, and diplomacy from the outposts of western history—in this book-length treatment of the force that became the U.S. Cavalry. The 1st Dragoons represented a new regiment of horsemen that drew on the combined skills and clashing visions of two types of leaders: old Indian killers and backwoodsmen such as loudmouth miner Henry Dodge; and straight-arrow battlefield veterans such as Stephen Watts Kearny, who had fought Redcoats in 1812 but now negotiated treaties with Indian tribes and enforced the new order of the West. Drawing on soldiers' journals and other never-before-used sources, Kearny's Dragoons Out West reconstructs this forgotten, often surprising moment in U.S. history. Under Kearny, the 1st Dragoons performed its mission through diplomacy and intimidation rather than violence, even protecting Indians from white settlers. Following the regiment up to the U.S.-Mexican War, when diplomacy gave way to open violence, this book introduces readers to future Civil War generals. Colorful characters appearing in these pages include Private Thomas Russell, a young attorney tricked by a horse thief into joining the army; James Hildreth, who authored two books on the 1st Dragoons; and English drill sergeant Long Ned Stanley, whose tenure in the 1st reveals much about American immigrants' experience in 1833-48. The promises made in Kearny's well-intentioned treaty making were ultimately broken. This detailed and in-depth look back at his legacy offers a glimpse of a lost world—and an intriguing turning point in the history of western expansion. 18 black-and-white Illustrations., 2 maps, 472 pages, 6" x 9". Will Gorenfeld writes about soldiers, operations, and battles of the pre-Civil War Army out west. His work has appeared in Wild West, the New Mexico Historical Review, Missouri Historical Review, and the collected volume Battles and Massacres on the Southwestern Frontier. His son, John Gorenfeld, is a writer whose work has appeared in the New York Observer, the London Guardian, and in the book Armchair Reader: Civil War. "This is a wonderful account of the early, golden years of the First Dragoons, the regular army's first mounted regiment, which spent its formative years as restrained diplomats, peacekeepers, intermediaries, and even protectors of the Southern Plains tribes. It is also the honest account of the unit's surprising decline after its conquest of New Mexico and the departure of such superior officers as Stephen Watts Kearny. Grounded in a wealth of primary sources and extraordinary research, it is a gracefully written story."—William P. MacKinnon, author of At Sword's Point: A Documentary History of the Utah War, Parts 1 and 2 "Kearny's Dragoons Out West is the culmination of decades of research. The Gorenfelds have woven the definitive narrative on what has far too long been an overlooked aspect of frontier military history."—John P. Langellier, author of US Dragoons, 1833-55 "Finally, the storied 1st U.S. Dragoons have received historical treatment worthy of the regiment's distinguished service from its inception through the U.S.-Mexican War. The Gorenfelds have done an outstanding service to the field of U.S. military history."—Durwood Ball, coeditor of Soldiers West: Biographies from the Military Frontier, Second Edition 
Price: 33.20 USD
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19 GRAHAM, W. A. The Custer Myth: A Source Book Of Custeriana.
Bonanza Books, New York: 1953. h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Good condition. Previous owner's name is written on front endpaper. 
Attempts to provide an exhaustive analysis of the Battle of Little Big Horn. Includes an Index. 
Price: 18.53 USD
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20 GREENE, JEROME A. Slim Buttes, 1876: An Episode Of The Great Sioux War.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2012. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
General George Crook's controversial "Horsemeat March" culminating in the battle at Slim Buttes is considered the turning point of the Sioux Wars. After Lieutenant General George A. Custer's shocking defeat at the Little Big Horn River, Montana Territory, in 1876, General Crook and the men of this Big Horn and Yellowstone Expedition were given orders to pursue and subjugate restive tribes of the Northern Cheyenne and Teton Sioux Indians in the area. General Crook, an able and experienced Indian campaigner, insisted that his men travel light and fast. This tactic nearly proved disastrous. Provisions ran out, and, with the nearest settlements still far away in the Black Hills, Crook's troops were forced to abandon, and later to devour, their exhausted and stringy mounts. When a detachment under Captain Anson Mills was dispatched to bring provisions from the settlements ahead, Mills accidentally came across a large Indian village at Slim Buttes. Lured as much by supplies of food in the village as by a desire to subjugate the Indians, Mills attacked, Crook arrived with reinforcements, and by the evening of the second day, September 9, 1876, the battle was over. The climax of General Crook's career and of one of the most arduous military expeditions in American history, this battle was the first of a series of blows that ultimately broke the Indians' resistance and forced their submission. The victory was not without irony. Crook's starvation march, his troops' nearly unanimous criticism of his command, Mill's account of an Indian child's tears over her mother's corpse, and doubts about whether the Indians involved had indeed had anything to do with Custer's defeat combined to steal most of the glory from the victor. Slim Buttes, 1876 presents in vivid detail the grisly realities of the Indian Wars and the suffering experienced by both sides. For the troops who campaigned in the lonely hinterlands of America, it was bloody, dangerous, and exhausting warfare fought, as General Crook said, "without favor or hope of reward." Jerome A. Greene is retired as Research Historian for the National Park Service. He is the author of numerous books, including Stricken Field: The Little Bighorn since 1876, Battles and Skirmishes of the Great Sioux War, 1876-1877: The Military View; Lakota and Cheyenne: Indian Views of the Great Sioux War, 1876-1877; and Morning Star Dawn: The Powder River Expedition and the Northern Cheyennes, 1876, all published by the University of Oklahoma Press. 
Price: 14.20 USD
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