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BOTANY.

BOTANY.

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1 Bonsai 64
4140400870 / 9784140400876 h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 
Contains full color photos of Bonsai trees presented at an exhibition in Japan. Captions are in English and Japanese. 
Price: 190.00 USD
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2 Orchids.
Grange Books, London: 1999. 1840132671 / 9781840132670 First Edition (Unstated). h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Very good condition. 
A comprehensive guide to identifying orchids. Includes vital notes on care and cultivation. Beautiful color photographs illustrate each species. Includes an Index. 
Price: 29.36 USD
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3 ALEXANDER, TAYLOR R.; BURNETT, R. WILL; ZIM, HERBERT S.; ZALLINGER, JEAN (ILLUSTRATOR); WEBSTER, VERA R. (EDITOR). Botany.
Golden Press, New York: 1970. h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Very good reading copy. 
This book empahsizes plant science - the diversity of form, the uniformity of processes, the ecological distribution, and the evolutionary development from simple to complex; but, it also endeavors to present the interaction and interdependence of all living forms. Includes an index. 
Price: 20.19 USD
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4 ALLAN, MEA; MATTHEWS, VICTORIA (DRAWINGS). Weeds: The Unbidden Guests In Our Gardens.
The Viking Press, New York: 1978. 0670756571 / 9780670756575 First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 
A detailed, practical guide to those plants that no gardener will ever be without - weeds. A unique identification guide covers over 200 plants, all illustrated with clear, beautiful line drawings. Includes an Index. 
Price: 29.91 USD
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5 ANDERSON, FRANK J. An Illustrated Treasury Of Cultivated Flowers.
Abbeville Press, New York: 1979. 0896590666 / 9780896590663 h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 

Price: 28.50 USD
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6 ANDERSON, JENNIFER L. Mahogany: The Costs Of Luxury In Early America.
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts and London England: 2012. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
In the mid-eighteenth century, colonial Americans became enamored with the rich colors and silky surface of mahogany. This exotic wood, imported from the West Indies and Central America, quickly displaced local furniture woods as the height of fashion. Over the next century, consumer demand for mahogany set in motion elaborate schemes to secure the trees and transform their rough-hewn logs into exquisite objects. But beneath the polished gleam of this furniture lies a darker, hidden story of human and environmental exploitation. Mahogany traces the path of this wood through many hands, from source to sale: from the enslaved African woodcutters, including skilled "huntsmen" who located the elusive trees amidst dense rainforest, to the ship captains, merchants, and timber dealers who scrambled after the best logs, to the skilled cabinetmakers who crafted the wood, and with it the tastes and aspirations of their diverse clientele. As the trees became scarce, however, the search for new sources led to expanded slave labor, vicious competition, and intense international conflicts over this diminishing natural resource. When nineteenth-century American furniture makers turned to other materials, surviving mahogany objects were revalued as antiques evocative of the nation's past. Jennifer L. Anderson offers a dynamic portrait of the many players, locales, and motivations that drove the voracious quest for mahogany to adorn American parlors and dining rooms. This complex story reveals the cultural, economic, and environmental costs of America's growing self-confidence and prosperity, and how desire shaped not just people's lives but the natural world. 432 pages, 5-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches, 11 color illustrations, 19 halftones, 2 maps. Jennifer L. Anderson is Associate Professor of History at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. "[A] fascinating book about the most coveted wood in early America and, indeed, the 18th-century British Empire… This enlightening…study does for mahogany what others long ago did for sugar and tobacco, chocolate and coffee, rubber and bananas… From an impressive number of archival sources [Anderson] has assembled a vibrant collective portrait of colonial grandees—Benjamin and William Franklin, among them—declaring their social dominance through hard-won mahogany possessions."—Kirk Davis Swinehart, The Wall Street Journal "From the 1720s to the mid-19th century, mahogany was the preeminent medium for conspicuous consumption on both sides of the Atlantic… However, as Anderson's superb [book] makes abundantly clear, the polished luster of these immaculate objects came from exploitative labor practices, ecological devastation, and phenomenal business failures, all of which attested to the commodity's natural and human cost… Anderson's is a remarkable contribution to Atlantic history that…will be much enjoyed by anyone interested in the history of trade in colonial America and the Caribbean."—Brian Odom, Library Journal "Anderson details the history of the search for, trade in, and use of mahogany. Though the title directs readers to early America, for Anderson, America is in reality the Atlantic world. Most of the author's time is spent among the islands of the Caribbean or near the Bay of Honduras in Belize, where mahogany was harvested. Anderson paints a picture of the Atlantic world in which travel and trade were the norm and families lived and worked up and down the coasts of North and Central America as well as on numerous Caribbean islands."—S.A. Jacobe, Choice "Anderson's evocative and stunning Mahogany reminds us of both the deep ties between humans and trees and the sharp consequences of allowing our passion for beauty to trump nature's capacity to sustain a species."—Peter C. Mancall, author of Fatal Journey: The Final Expedition of Henry Hudson "Anderson has crafted a rich blend of the cultural history of mahogany, the social history of logging, the economic history of the mahogany timber trade, the environmental history of Caribbean forests, and the history of the natural history of mahogany. The result is an elegant essay in Atlantic history."—J.R. McNeill, author of Mosquito Empires: Ecology and War in the Greater Caribbean, 1620-1914 "This superb study of a vital early American commodity focuses on its production, distribution, and consumption from the age of sail to the era of steam. Mahogany's sumptuousness came at a severe price, somewhat offset by enhanced knowledge of its properties and opportunities in its harvesting. With its highly nuanced and sophisticated argument, this book deserves a wide readership."—Philip Morgan, author of Slave Counterpoint: Black Culture in the Eighteenth-Century Chesapeake and Lowcountry "'When you drink the water, think of the well-digger,' is folk wisdom around the world. Anderson wisely adds, when you see elegant mahogany furniture, think of the hard-handed African slave hacking away, under deadly working conditions, at a tall hardwood tree in a hot, dense Caribbean rainforest. Like Sidney Mintz's classic study of sugar, Sweetness and Power, this book makes us see the familiar in new and disturbing ways."—Marcus Rediker, author of The Slave Ship: A Human History 
Price: 36.81 USD
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7 ANDERSON, JENNIFER L. Mahogany: The Costs Of Luxury In Early America.
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts and London England: 2015. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
In the mid-eighteenth century, colonial Americans became enamored with the rich colors and silky surface of mahogany. This exotic wood, imported from the West Indies and Central America, quickly displaced local furniture woods as the height of fashion. Over the next century, consumer demand for mahogany set in motion elaborate schemes to secure the trees and transform their rough-hewn logs into exquisite objects. But beneath the polished gleam of this furniture lies a darker, hidden story of human and environmental exploitation. Mahogany traces the path of this wood through many hands, from source to sale: from the enslaved African woodcutters, including skilled "huntsmen" who located the elusive trees amidst dense rainforest, to the ship captains, merchants, and timber dealers who scrambled after the best logs, to the skilled cabinetmakers who crafted the wood, and with it the tastes and aspirations of their diverse clientele. As the trees became scarce, however, the search for new sources led to expanded slave labor, vicious competition, and intense international conflicts over this diminishing natural resource. When nineteenth-century American furniture makers turned to other materials, surviving mahogany objects were revalued as antiques evocative of the nation's past. Jennifer L. Anderson offers a dynamic portrait of the many players, locales, and motivations that drove the voracious quest for mahogany to adorn American parlors and dining rooms. This complex story reveals the cultural, economic, and environmental costs of America's growing self-confidence and prosperity, and how desire shaped not just people's lives but the natural world. 432 pages, 5-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches, 11 color illustrations, 19 halftones, 2 maps. Jennifer L. Anderson is Associate Professor of History at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. "[A] fascinating book about the most coveted wood in early America and, indeed, the 18th-century British Empire… This enlightening…study does for mahogany what others long ago did for sugar and tobacco, chocolate and coffee, rubber and bananas… From an impressive number of archival sources [Anderson] has assembled a vibrant collective portrait of colonial grandees—Benjamin and William Franklin, among them—declaring their social dominance through hard-won mahogany possessions."—Kirk Davis Swinehart, The Wall Street Journal "From the 1720s to the mid-19th century, mahogany was the preeminent medium for conspicuous consumption on both sides of the Atlantic… However, as Anderson's superb [book] makes abundantly clear, the polished luster of these immaculate objects came from exploitative labor practices, ecological devastation, and phenomenal business failures, all of which attested to the commodity's natural and human cost… Anderson's is a remarkable contribution to Atlantic history that…will be much enjoyed by anyone interested in the history of trade in colonial America and the Caribbean."—Brian Odom, Library Journal "Anderson details the history of the search for, trade in, and use of mahogany. Though the title directs readers to early America, for Anderson, America is in reality the Atlantic world. Most of the author's time is spent among the islands of the Caribbean or near the Bay of Honduras in Belize, where mahogany was harvested. Anderson paints a picture of the Atlantic world in which travel and trade were the norm and families lived and worked up and down the coasts of North and Central America as well as on numerous Caribbean islands."—S.A. Jacobe, Choice "Anderson's evocative and stunning Mahogany reminds us of both the deep ties between humans and trees and the sharp consequences of allowing our passion for beauty to trump nature's capacity to sustain a species."—Peter C. Mancall, author of Fatal Journey: The Final Expedition of Henry Hudson "Anderson has crafted a rich blend of the cultural history of mahogany, the social history of logging, the economic history of the mahogany timber trade, the environmental history of Caribbean forests, and the history of the natural history of mahogany. The result is an elegant essay in Atlantic history."—J.R. McNeill, author of Mosquito Empires: Ecology and War in the Greater Caribbean, 1620-1914 "This superb study of a vital early American commodity focuses on its production, distribution, and consumption from the age of sail to the era of steam. Mahogany's sumptuousness came at a severe price, somewhat offset by enhanced knowledge of its properties and opportunities in its harvesting. With its highly nuanced and sophisticated argument, this book deserves a wide readership."—Philip Morgan, author of Slave Counterpoint: Black Culture in the Eighteenth-Century Chesapeake and Lowcountry "'When you drink the water, think of the well-digger,' is folk wisdom around the world. Anderson wisely adds, when you see elegant mahogany furniture, think of the hard-handed African slave hacking away, under deadly working conditions, at a tall hardwood tree in a hot, dense Caribbean rainforest. Like Sidney Mintz's classic study of sugar, Sweetness and Power, this book makes us see the familiar in new and disturbing ways."—Marcus Rediker, author of The Slave Ship: A Human History 
Price: 19.19 USD
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8 ARNOLD, AUGUSTA FOOTE. The Sea-beach At Ebb-tide: A Guide To The Study Of The Seaweeds And The Lower Animal Life Found Between Tide-marks.
Dover Publications, Inc., New York: 1968. 0486219496 / 9780486219493 Reprint Edition. s Softcover. Good condition. 
A classic handbook, this work has been long respecrted for its unusually broad coverage and wealth of illustrations - over 600. It will enable you to find and identify hundreds of the most conspicuous and important vegetal and lower animal species that crowd the littoral areas of the eastern, southern, and westerm coasts of North America. Includes an Index. 
Price: 7.74 USD
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9 ASHLEY, GEORGE, BAYLIS, MAGGIE (DRAWINGS). The Punctured Thumb: Or, Cactus And Other Succulents.
101 Productions, San Francisco: 1977. 089286124X / 9780892861248 s Softcover. Good condition. Signed by illustrator. 

Price: 14.96 USD
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10 AUSTIN, DANIEL F. Baboquivari Mountain Plants: Identification Ecology And Ethnobotany.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson 2010. First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
The Baboquivari Mountains, long considered to be a sacred space by the Tohono O'odham people who are native to the area, are the westernmost of the so-called Sky Islands. The mountains form the border between the floristic regions of Chihuahua and Sonora. This encyclopedic work describes the flora of this unique area in detail. It includes descriptions, identifications, ecology, and extensive etymologies of plant names in European and indigenous languages. Daniel Austin also describes pollination biology and seed dispersal and explains how plants in the area have been used by humans, beginning with Native Americans. The term "sky island" was first used by Weldon Heald in 1967 to describe mountain ranges that are separated from each other by valleys of grassland or desert. The valleys create barriers to the spread of plant species in a way that is similar to the separation of islands in an ocean. The 70,000-square-mile Sky Islands region of southeastern Arizona, southwestern New Mexico, and northwestern Mexico is of particular interest to botanists because of its striking diversity of plant species and habitats. With more than 3,000 species of plants, the region offers a surprising range of tropical and temperate zones. Although others have written about the region, this is the first book to focus exclusively on the plant life of the Baboquivari Mountains. The book offers an introduction to the history of the region, along with a discussion of human influences, and includes a useful appendix that lists all of the plants known to be growing in the Baboquivari Mountain chain. 
Price: 76.19 USD
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11 BATES, ALFRED. The Gardener's Second Year: Perennials And Bulbs.
Longmans, Green and Co., New York: 1937 First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good reading copy. 

Price: 14.25 USD
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12 BERGEN, JOSEPH Y. Foundations Of Botany.
Ginn & Company, New York: 1901. h Hardcover no dustjacket. Poor reading copy has torn cover and some torn pages. 
This book gives a detail account of botany. 
Price: 8.31 USD
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13 BIRD, RICHARD. A Gardeners' Latin.
Hearst Books, New York: 1999. 0688167799 / 9780688167790 First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 

Price: 23.52 USD
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14 BLACK, MEREL R. & JUDZIEWICZ, EMMET J. Wildflowers Of Wisconsin And The Great Lakes Region: A Comprehensive Field Guide.
University of Wisconsin Press, Madison: 2009. Second Edition. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Describing more than 1,100 species, this is a comprehensive guide to wildflowers in Wisconsin and parts of Minnesota, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, and Ontario. A new introduction to this second edition discusses wildflowers in the context of their natural communities. Packed with detailed information, this field guide is compact enough to be handy for outdoors lovers of all kinds, from novice naturalists to professional botanists. It includes: • more than 1,100 species from 459 genera in 100 families • many rare and previously overlooked species • Includes wildflowers in Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, and Ontario • 2,100 color photographs and 300 drawings • Wisconsin distribution maps for almost all plants • brief descriptions including distinguishing characteristics of the species • Wisconsin status levels for each species of wildflower (native, invasive, endangered, etc.) • derivation of Latin names. 2,100 color photos, 300 drawings, 1,085 range maps. Merel R. Black has been an honorary fellow in botany at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point. She manages the "Plants of Wisconsin" Web site. Emmet J. Judziewicz is associate professor of biology at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point and curator of vascular plants at the Robert W. Freckmann Herbarium. "No other manual combines the accessible approach with the species coverage of this book. Accurate and highly usable, it will likely become the wildflower field guide of choice for our region."—Andrew L. Hipp, the Morton Arboretum, author of Sedges of Wisconsin "This accurate, usable guide to our flora will undoubtedly find its way into the backpacks of many a naturalist."—Thomas A. Meyer, conservation biologist, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources 
Price: 28.45 USD
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15 BOWN, DENI. Garden Herbs.
DK Publishing, London: 1998. 0789423979 / 9780789423979 First American Edition, Second Printing. s Softcover. Brand New Book. 
A photographic guide to more than 450 herbs by type, size and color. Includes an Index. 
Price: 22.61 USD
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16 BRANDT, SUE R. State Trees: Including The Commonwealth Of Puerto Rico.
Franklin Watts, New York: 1992. 0531200000 / 9780531200001 h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Good condition. 

Price: 3301.25 USD
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17 BROCK, EMILY K. Money Trees: The Douglas Fir And American Forestry, 1900-1944.
Oregon State University Press, Corvallis: 2015. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Around the start of the last century, the forests of the Pacific Northwest were viewed as dynamic sites of industrial production, and also as natural landscapes of ecological integrity. These competing visions arose as the nation's professional foresters faced conflicting demands from lumber companies and government regulators. External pressures converged with internal scientific debates within the profession, leading foresters to question the proper scope of their work. Money Trees is an interdisciplinary history of the crucial decades that shaped the modern American conception of the value of the forest. It begins with early 20th century environmental changes in the Douglas Fir forests of the Pacific Northwest, which led to increasing divisiveness and controversy among foresters. Brock balances this regional story with a national view of the intellectual and political currents that governed forest management, marshaling archival evidence from industry, government, and scientific sources. An important contribution to environmental scholarship, Money Trees offers a nuanced vision of forestry's history and its past relationship to both wilderness activism and scientific ecology. With fresh perspectives on well-known environmental figures such as Bob Marshall and Gifford Pinchot, it will add to the conversation among scholars in environmental history, history of science, and the history of the American West. It will be welcomed as a key resource across the spectrum of environmental studies, and by anyone interested in natural resources, land management, the role of science in environmentalism, and the modern wilderness movement. "This scholarly work is a thorough interdisciplinary history of forestry in the Pacific Northwest and a significant contribution to environmental studies." - The College "Brock's book is a good primer to understanding that science is never static and rarely the sole determiner in land management policy: culture, politics, economics, and capital all play parts in determining the course of federal forest policy. This book would be very appropriate for graduate classes in the history of science and environmental history, particularly for those interested in the history of public land management and in Oregon history." -- Lincoln Bramwell, Oregon Historical Quarterly "By documenting the important and evolving relationship between foresters and lumber companies, Brock reveals how foresters ultimately helped industry derive not just economic value but also long-term ecological value from the Douglas-fir forests." -- Eben Lehman, Forest History Today "Scholars of forest history will find much to glean from this book." -- Greg Gordon, Western Historical Quarterly "The Douglas-fir is tightly woven into this century-long history, and in Brock's telling, it dominates the historical narrative as thoroughly as it defines the forest canopy, which only underscores her concluding insight about this tree's central position as the region's "totem species and economic focus--the money tree" (p. 200)." -- Char Miller, Journal of Forestry 
Price: 26.55 USD
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18 BROOKLYN BOTANIC GARDEN. Dye Plants And Dyeing: A Handbook.
Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Brooklyn: 1968. Special Printing Of Plants & Gardens - Volume 20, No. 3. s Softcover. Very good reading copy. 
Consists of coloring yarns and textiles with dyes from plants with basic directions. Also provides recipes from many countries and a full decription of the culture of dye plants and their historical background. 
Price: 15.20 USD
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19 BROOKLYN BOTANIC GARDEN. Handbook On Herbs.
Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Brooklyn: 1969. Special Printing of Plants & Gardens, Volume 14, No. 2. s Softcover. Good condition. 
An illustrated dictionary of herbs that describes how to propagate herbs of common as well as unusual herbs of ornamental value. Also contains topics of herbs for shaded gardens, mints, scented geraniums, and thyme. 
Price: 14.49 USD
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20 BUTLER, PATRICIA. Irish Botanical Illustrations & Flower Painters.
Antique Collectors' Club, Woodbridge: 2000. 1851493573 / 9781851493579 h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 
The author presents a general survey of the subject from an Irish standpoint, covering the period from 1729 to the end of the 20th century and defining the styles and techniques of 70 individual artists. Considerable original research into both public and private collections has led to fascinating new insights into over 200 years of art history. The book is divided into three sections: botanical artists, flower painters, and artists who worked mainly abroad. Includes an Index. 
Price: 141.55 USD
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