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BLACK STUDIES.

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1 BALDWIN, JAMES. The Fire Next Time.
Dell, New York: August 1964. First Dell printing. s Softcover. Reading copy. Contains some underlining. 
"Explains what it means to be a Negro in America . . . If there ever was a compassionate and eloquent sermon for our time, demanding the most agonizing self-examination from anyone who reads, this is it . . . great . . . extraordinary." - Harper's. 
Price: 14.31 USD
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2 BALDWIN, JAMES. The Fire Next Time.
Dell, New York: August 1964. 067974472X / 9780679744726 First Dell printing. s Softcover. Very good condition. 
At once a powerful evocation of his early life in Harlem and a disturbing examination of the consequences of racial injustice - to both the individual and the body politic - The Fire Next Time, which galvanized the nation in the early days of the civil rights movement, stands as one of the essential works of our literature. "Explains what it means to be a Negro in America . . . If there ever was a compassionate and eloquent sermon for our time, demanding the most agonizing self-examination from anyone who reads, this is it . . . great . . . extraordinary." - Harper's 
Price: 9.17 USD
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3 BARR, ALWYN. Black Texans: A History Of African Americans In Texas, 1528-1995.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2002. Second Edition. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
African Americans have lived in Texas for more than four hundred years—longer than in any other region of the United States. Beginning with the arrival of the first African American in 1528, Alwyn Barr, in Black Texans, examines the African American experience in Texas during the periods of exploration and colonization, slavery, Reconstruction, the struggle to retain the freedoms gained, the twentieth-century urban experience, and the modern civil rights movement. Barr discusses each period of African-American history in terms of politics, violence, and legal status; labor and economic status; education; and social life. Black Texans includes the history of the buffalo soldiers and the cowboys on Texas cattle drives, along with the achievements of notable African-American individuals in Texas history, from the Estevan the explorer through legislator Norris Wright Cuney and boxer Jack Johnson to state senator Barbara Jordan. Barr carries the story up to the present day in this second edition, which includes a new preface a new chapter on the years 1970-95, and a revised index. Alwyn Barr is Professor of History at Texas Tech University and the author of Reconstruction to Reform: Texas Politic, 1876-1906 and Texas in Revolt: The Battle for San Antonio, 1835. "Written in an enthusiastic and scholarly style, this book about black people in Texas is an excellent survey....Black Texans is a very fine contribution to the field."—Journal of American History. "A brilliant study by a leading authority, Black Texans will long remain an outstanding contribution to Texas, Black, and Southern history."—Chronicles of Oklahoma. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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4 BELL, DERRICK. And We Are Not Saved: The Elusive Quest For Racial Justice.
Basic Books, New York: 1989. 046500329X / 9780465003297 s Softcover. Reading copy. 
Harvard's first black tenured law professor combines fiction with fact to dramatize continuing racial injustices in the United States. Includes an Index. 
Price: 15.20 USD
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5 BONTEMPS, ARNA & CONROY, JACK. They Seek A City.
Doubleday, Doran and Co., Garden City: 1945. First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket.Reading copy but dustjacket is only in fair condition and part of it is missing. 
The real story of Black migration within the United States is told here for the first time. Fresh, colorful, dotted with unusual personalities, it highlights important chapters in their pursuit of tolerance and better economic opportunities. Includes an Index. 
Price: 93.81 USD
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6 CLEAVER, ELDRIDGE; SCHEER, ROBERT (EDITOR & INTRODUCTION). Eldridge Cleaver: Post-prison Writings And Speeches.
A Ramparts Book, New York: September 1969. First Vintage Books Edition. s Softcover. Very good reading copy. 
"After reading this urgently important book, no one should fail to realize how accurately Cleaver pinpoints the American malaise and its relationship to current world affairs - or just how remarkable a man he is, or how valuable." - Lindsay Patterson, The New York Times Book Review. 
Price: 18.48 USD
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7 DOBAK, WILLIAM A. & THOMAS D. PHILLIPS. The Black Regulars, 1866-1898.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2001. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Black soldiers first entered the regular army of the United States in the summer of 1866. While their segregated regiments served in the American West for the next three decades, the promise of the Reconstruction era gave way to the repressiveness of Jim Crow. But black men found a degree of equality in the service: the army treated them no worse than it did their white counterparts. The Black Regulars uses army correspondence, court martial transcripts, and pension applications to tell who these men were often in their own words: how they were recruited and how their officers were selected; how the black regiments survived hostile Congressional hearings and stringent budget cuts; how enlisted men spent their time, both on and off duty; and how regimental chaplains tried to promote literacy through the army's schools. The authors shed new light on the military justice system, relations between black troops and their mostly white civilian neighbors, their professional reputations, and what veterans faced when they left the army for civilian life. 19 black-and-white Illustrations, 2 maps, 384 pages, 6" x 9". William A. Dobak received a Ph.D. in American Studies from the University of Kansas in 1995. He now works at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. Thomas D. Phillips holds a Ph.D. in history from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. "Based on exhaustive research in documents never before exploited, The Black Regulars offers fresh perspectives on black soldiers and overturns many long-held assumptions. A seminal work."--Robert M. Utley,, author of Cavalier in Buckskin "The army offered black men better opportunities than did civilian life, and William Dobak's The Black Regulars offers us the best study of their experiences."--James M. McPherson "Well written and full of fascinating detail, this balanced account should clear up many misconceptions."--Roger Lane, author of The Roots of Black Violence in Philadelphia, 1860-1900 
Price: 25.60 USD
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8 DOBAK, WILLIAM A. & THOMAS D. PHILLIPS. The Black Regulars, 1866-1898.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2017. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Black soldiers first entered the regular army of the United States in the summer of 1866. While their segregated regiments served in the American West for the next three decades, the promise of the Reconstruction era gave way to the repressiveness of Jim Crow. But black men found a degree of equality in the service: the army treated them no worse than it did their white counterparts. The Black Regulars uses army correspondence, court martial transcripts, and pension applications to tell who these men were often in their own words: how they were recruited and how their officers were selected; how the black regiments survived hostile Congressional hearings and stringent budget cuts; how enlisted men spent their time, both on and off duty; and how regimental chaplains tried to promote literacy through the army's schools. The authors shed new light on the military justice system, relations between black troops and their mostly white civilian neighbors, their professional reputations, and what veterans faced when they left the army for civilian life. 19 black-and-white Illustrations, 2 maps, 384 pages, 6" x 9". William A. Dobak received a Ph.D. in American Studies from the University of Kansas in 1995. He now works at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. Thomas D. Phillips holds a Ph.D. in history from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. "Based on exhaustive research in documents never before exploited, The Black Regulars offers fresh perspectives on black soldiers and overturns many long-held assumptions. A seminal work."--Robert M. Utley,, author of Cavalier in Buckskin "The army offered black men better opportunities than did civilian life, and William Dobak's The Black Regulars offers us the best study of their experiences."--James M. McPherson "Well written and full of fascinating detail, this balanced account should clear up many misconceptions."--Roger Lane, author of The Roots of Black Violence in Philadelphia, 1860-1900 
Price: 20.85 USD
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9 FURNAS, J. C . Goodbye To Uncle Tom.
William Sloane Associates Inc., New York: 1956. Book Club Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 
An analysis of the myths pertaining to the American Negro, from their origins to the misconceptions of today. Includes an Index. 
Price: 7.55 USD
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10 HAGER, CHRISTOPHER. Word By Word: Emancipation And The Act Of Writing.
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts and London England: 2015. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
One of the cruelest abuses of slavery in America was that slaves were forbidden to read and write. Consigned to illiteracy, they left no records of their thoughts and feelings apart from the few exceptional narratives of Frederick Douglass and others who escaped to the North—or so we have long believed. But as Christopher Hager reveals, a few enslaved African Americans managed to become literate in spite of all prohibitions, and during the halting years of emancipation thousands more seized the chance to learn. The letters and diaries of these novice writers, unpolished and hesitant yet rich with voice, show ordinary black men and women across the South using pen and paper to make sense of their experiences. Through an unprecedented gathering of these forgotten writings—from letters by individuals sold away from their families, to petitions from freedmen in the army to their new leaders, to a New Orleans man's transcription of the Constitution—Word by Word rewrites the history of emancipation. The idiosyncrasies of these untutored authors, Hager argues, reveal the enormous difficulty of straddling the border between slave and free. These unusual texts, composed by people with a unique perspective on the written word, force us to rethink the relationship between literacy and freedom. For African Americans at the end of slavery, learning to write could be liberating and empowering, but putting their hard-won skill to use often proved arduous and daunting—a portent of the tenuousness of the freedom to come. 328 pages, 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches, 11 halftones. Christopher Hager is Associate Professor of English and American Studies at Trinity College, Hartford. "Through a series of bold, imaginative and insightful case studies, Christopher Hager uncovers the intellectual world of U.S. slavery and charts the hopes, expectations and fears of enslaved writers… By understanding emancipation as a slow process rather than a rapid transformation, Word by Word shows how literacy was an incomplete and sometimes flawed instrument of black self-determination. The idea of emancipation as an unfinished revolution is not new, nor is the attention to subterranean networks of enslaved information and exchange particularly novel in slavery studies. By rendering legible and audible the writings of the literate minority, however, Hager reveals the desperate and creative measures taken by former slaves to assert their communal and individual voices. Most of course continued unlettered, but the striking improvement in black literacy during the two decades after emancipation (from 10 to 30 per cent) is testimony to the enduring importance attached to the written word and the empowering potential of African-American writing."—Richard Follett, Times Higher Education "Christopher Hager does a fascinating job of sifting through these letters [written by slaves], fleshing out as much as possible the stories of their authors, and casting it all as black America's first attempts at forging a voice in this strange land, in Word by Word: Emancipation and the Act of Writing."—Mark Reynolds, PopMatters "While Frederick Douglass invigorated abolitionists with his eloquent prose, many of his contemporaries, still enslaved or recently freed, scrawled barely legible letters to friends and family sold to distant masters. In this revelatory hybrid of history and textual analysis, Hager argues that the act of writing—often in defiance of states' antiliteracy laws—was an exceedingly potent form of self-empowerment for these oppressed men and women, never mind their poor spelling and unorthodox methods (one potter carved poetry into his work, another 'composed at the handle of the plough' and kept the lines memorized till he learned to write). Primary documents, intensely scrutinized, reveal powerful emotions and common hardships, bear witness to racial struggles across the country, and provide unalloyed insight into the stark yet hopeful reality after the Emancipation Proclamation. Particularly fascinating is the evolution of writing as a form of power: a former slave protests, via letter, to a Union general about Union soldiers attacking his neighbor's wife, while another journals his integration into the U.S. Navy with perfunctory but increasingly assured entries. This thoughtful examination of the artifacts of a too-long-silenced population is made all the more eloquent by accompanying facsimiles of the arduously penned missives."—Publishers Weekly "Hager provides an informed and informative view of writings produced by formerly enslaved African Americans, often overlooked as an illiterate group. Hager reminds readers to attend to those texts that have the power to give scholars a broader perspective of particular moments… By paying attention to these authors, Hager aims to develop new models for the interpretation of historical sources and give voice to both the unknown and the underappreciated."—T.T. Green, Choice "[An] always engaging account of how the path to freedom was paved, in part, with written words."—Kirkus Reviews "Hager seeks to craft an intellectual history of a people too often dismissed as illiterate and lacking a culture of letters. His focus is not on stars who are well known from fugitive slave narratives, but on a handful of more or less literate blacks whose previously unpublished letters provide pieces of a complex and rich narrative of liberation. Hager discusses the mental process of writing, exploring the inner lives, secrecy, and subversion shown in black initiatives to learn how to write and how to use writing to end enslavement and to embrace emancipation." —Thomas J. Davis, Library Journal "From its first pages, where a stumbling black writer in Civil War New Orleans picks up the U.S. Constitution, Word by Word focuses on the initial tremors of freedom for ordinary people amid wartime turmoil and the process of emancipation. This is original work of the highest order."—Kathleen Diffley, editor of To Live and Die: Collected Stories of the Civil War, 1861-1876 "Hager brilliantly imagines scenes of writing among freed people in the decades immediately following emancipation, showing how former slaves turned to writing as a way of taking control of their world. Word by Word is a major and revelatory act of historical recovery done with imaginative sympathy and critical verve."—Robert S. Levine, author of Dislocating Race and Nation: Episodes in Nineteenth-Century American Literary Nationalism "A penetrating and revealing portrait of people in the process of defining freedom, Word by Word is a stirring, important work that reshapes our understanding of slavery and emancipation."—Louis P. Masur, author of Lincoln's Hundred Days: The Emancipation Proclamation and the War for the Union 
Price: 18.95 USD
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11 HATHAWAY, HEATHER. Caribbean Waves: Relocating Claude Mckay And Paule Marshall.
Indiana University Press, Bloomington: 1999. 0253335698 / 9780253335692 First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Very good condition. 
Explores the ways in which literature can probe the complexities of displacement and identity construction that often accompany migratory experiences. Analysis of McKay's and Marshall's works reveals how the forces of migration, racial and national affiliation, and "Americanization" can merge to produce uniquely hybridized, and at times profoundly homeless, black American immigrant identities. Includes an Index. 
Price: 37.62 USD
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12 HINGER, CHARLOTTE. Nicodemus: Post-reconstruction Politics And Racial Justice In Western Kansas.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2016. Volume 11 in Race and Culture in the American West. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Pushed out of the South as Reconstruction ended and as white landowners, employers, and "Redeemer" governments sought to reestablish the constraints of slavery, thousands of African Americans migrated west in search of better opportunities. As the first well-known all-black community on the plains, Nicodemus, Kansas, became a national exemplar of black self-improvement. But Nicodemus also embodied many of the problems facing African Americans during this time. Diverging philosophies within the community, Charlotte Hinger argues, foretold the differences that continue to divide black politicians and intellectuals today. At the time Nicodemus was founded, politicians underestimated the power of African American voters. But three of the town's black homesteaders—Abram Thompson Hall, Jr., Edward Preston McCabe, and John W. Niles—exerted extraordinary influence over county, state, and national politics. Hinger examines their divergent strategies for leading their community and for relating to white people, which reflected emerging black worldviews across the United States as African Americans grappled with the responsibilities accompanying their new freedom. Hall supported racial uplift, McCabe insisted on achieving equality through politics and legislation, and Niles advocated reparations for slavery. Hall and McCabe, both northerners, had distinguished educations, while Niles, a former slave, was a gifted orator. Their differing approaches to creating a new civilization on the prairie, seeking justice for blacks, and improving the situation of Nicodemus citizens roiled Kansas politics, already in turmoil over temperance and woman's suffrage. Nicodemus was a microcosm of all the issues facing black Americans in the late nineteenth century, and Hall, McCabe, and Niles are archetypes for powerful philosophies that have persisted into the twenty-first century. This study of their ideas and the ways they shaped Nicodemus offers a novel perspective on the most famous post-Civil War African American community in the West. 20 black-and-white Illustrations, 232 pages, 6" x 9". Award-winning novelist and independent historian Charlotte Hinger is the author of several articles and encyclopedia entries on African American history in the West and the novels Come Spring, Deadly Descent, Lethal Lineage, and Hidden Heritage. "Rich in detail and carefully researched, Charlotte Hinger's fine study illuminates the growth, development, and maturation of Nicodemus, Kansas, the most successful black town established during the 'Kansas Exodus.' Nicodemus also reveals the paradoxical race relations that African Americans experienced, the voices of ordinary people, the role that American Indians played in assisting the earliest black settlers, and their quest for full equality and civil rights. Historians of western and African American history will welcome and embrace this book."—Albert S. Broussard, author of Expectations of Equality: A History of Black Westerners "In this unprecedented full-length scholarly study of Nicodemus, Charlotte Hinger shows that the experiences of obtaining land, recruiting residents, building communities, protecting economic and political interests, grappling with the moral headache of helping refugees—all on the harsh, lonely prairies of western Kansas—drew African Americans into the same divergent patterns of racial uplift, social justice, and radicalism with which they would contend in the century and a half that followed."—James N. Leiker, author of Racial Borders: Black Soldiers along the Rio Grande 
Price: 28.45 USD
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13 HOBBS, ALLYSON. A Chosen Exile: A History Of Racial Passing In American Life.
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts and London England: 2016. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
On NPR's All Things Considered, listen to Allyson Hobbs discuss the difficulty of losing family and community in order to gain socioeconomic opportunities: Between the eighteenth and mid-twentieth centuries, countless African Americans passed as white, leaving behind families and friends, roots and community. It was, as Allyson Hobbs writes, a chosen exile, a separation from one racial identity and the leap into another. This revelatory history of passing explores the possibilities and challenges that racial indeterminacy presented to men and women living in a country obsessed with racial distinctions. It also tells a tale of loss. As racial relations in America have evolved so has the significance of passing. To pass as white in the antebellum South was to escape the shackles of slavery. After emancipation, many African Americans came to regard passing as a form of betrayal, a selling of one's birthright. When the initially hopeful period of Reconstruction proved short-lived, passing became an opportunity to defy Jim Crow and strike out on one's own. Although black Americans who adopted white identities reaped benefits of expanded opportunity and mobility, Hobbs helps us to recognize and understand the grief, loneliness, and isolation that accompanied—and often outweighed—these rewards. By the dawning of the civil rights era, more and more racially mixed Americans felt the loss of kin and community was too much to bear, that it was time to "pass out" and embrace a black identity. Although recent decades have witnessed an increasingly multiracial society and a growing acceptance of hybridity, the problem of race and identity remains at the center of public debate and emotionally fraught personal decisions. 400 pages, 5-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches, 26 halftones. Allyson Hobbs is Assistant Professor of History at Stanford University. "[An] incisive cultural history… [Hobbs] takes nothing at face value—least of all the idea that the person who is passing is actually and truly of one race or the other… [A] critically vigilant work."—Danzy Senna, The New York Times Book Review "A book that is at once literary, cultural, archival and social, crossing the borders of various approaches to the study of history in order to create a collage of a fascinating yet elusive phenomenon. Intrigued by the story of a distant relative who crosses the color line, Hobbs has followed this interest to explore the practice of passing with detail and rigor. Her writing is elegant, bubbling with curiosity even as it is authoritative and revelatory." —Imani Perry, The San Francisco Chronicle "The book is an admirable effort to catalogue the myriad classifications of race in America, to develop a taxonomy of biases that endure even as the country's complexion changes."—Joshua Cohen, Harper's "Hobbs provides fresh analysis of an oft-ignored phenomenon, and the result is as fascinating as it is innovative. She foregrounds the sense of loss that passing inflicted, and argues that many of those who were left behind were just as wounded and traumatized as those who departed. Those who passed may have had much to gain, but what were the hidden costs, the invisible scars of enforced patterns of subversion and suppression? She suggests that the core issue of passing is not what an individual becomes, but rather 'losing what you pass away from.' By turning safe assumptions inside out, Hobbs questions some of the longest-held ideas about racial identification within American society."—Catherine Clinton, Times Higher Education "Passing, as Allyson Hobbs describes in this brilliant, fascinating new study, is itself as fluid, complex, and contradictory as our ideas of race."—Kate Tuttle, The Boston Globe "By investigating the binary lives of the so-called ghosts that exist in American history, Hobbs raises important questions and ideas about race relations and the 'lost' histories of African American communities. "—Cicely Douglas, Library Journal "In narrating the lives of Americans at the border of whiteness, Hobbs illuminates our understanding of our country's tortured race history and of the injustices that drove people to make the ultimate migration—out of the tyranny of enslavement and the terrors of Jim Crow to the costly privilege of the larger white world. Their anguish, alienation, and constant fear of discovery are brilliantly and painfully rendered in this important book, and, through them, we see the arbitrariness of race and the origins of racial divisions that we live with to this day."—Isabel Wilkerson, author of The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration "With remarkable research and deep feeling for her subjects, Hobbs uncovers the stories of countless Americans of African descent who severed their family ties to pass into a world where they would be accorded the privileges of whites. At turns sad, inspiring, and provocative, the book raises important questions about the enduring power of race in American life."—Martha A. Sandweiss, author of Passing Strange: A Gilded Age Tale of Love and Deception Across the Color Line 
Price: 16.10 USD
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14 HOBBS, ALLYSON. A Chosen Exile: A History Of Racial Passing In American Life.
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts and London England: 2014. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
On NPR's All Things Considered, listen to Allyson Hobbs discuss the difficulty of losing family and community in order to gain socioeconomic opportunities: Between the eighteenth and mid-twentieth centuries, countless African Americans passed as white, leaving behind families and friends, roots and community. It was, as Allyson Hobbs writes, a chosen exile, a separation from one racial identity and the leap into another. This revelatory history of passing explores the possibilities and challenges that racial indeterminacy presented to men and women living in a country obsessed with racial distinctions. It also tells a tale of loss. As racial relations in America have evolved so has the significance of passing. To pass as white in the antebellum South was to escape the shackles of slavery. After emancipation, many African Americans came to regard passing as a form of betrayal, a selling of one's birthright. When the initially hopeful period of Reconstruction proved short-lived, passing became an opportunity to defy Jim Crow and strike out on one's own. Although black Americans who adopted white identities reaped benefits of expanded opportunity and mobility, Hobbs helps us to recognize and understand the grief, loneliness, and isolation that accompanied—and often outweighed—these rewards. By the dawning of the civil rights era, more and more racially mixed Americans felt the loss of kin and community was too much to bear, that it was time to "pass out" and embrace a black identity. Although recent decades have witnessed an increasingly multiracial society and a growing acceptance of hybridity, the problem of race and identity remains at the center of public debate and emotionally fraught personal decisions. 400 pages, 5-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches, 26 halftones. Allyson Hobbs is Assistant Professor of History at Stanford University. "[An] incisive cultural history… [Hobbs] takes nothing at face value—least of all the idea that the person who is passing is actually and truly of one race or the other… [A] critically vigilant work."—Danzy Senna, The New York Times Book Review "A book that is at once literary, cultural, archival and social, crossing the borders of various approaches to the study of history in order to create a collage of a fascinating yet elusive phenomenon. Intrigued by the story of a distant relative who crosses the color line, Hobbs has followed this interest to explore the practice of passing with detail and rigor. Her writing is elegant, bubbling with curiosity even as it is authoritative and revelatory." —Imani Perry, The San Francisco Chronicle "The book is an admirable effort to catalogue the myriad classifications of race in America, to develop a taxonomy of biases that endure even as the country's complexion changes."—Joshua Cohen, Harper's "Hobbs provides fresh analysis of an oft-ignored phenomenon, and the result is as fascinating as it is innovative. She foregrounds the sense of loss that passing inflicted, and argues that many of those who were left behind were just as wounded and traumatized as those who departed. Those who passed may have had much to gain, but what were the hidden costs, the invisible scars of enforced patterns of subversion and suppression? She suggests that the core issue of passing is not what an individual becomes, but rather 'losing what you pass away from.' By turning safe assumptions inside out, Hobbs questions some of the longest-held ideas about racial identification within American society."—Catherine Clinton, Times Higher Education "Passing, as Allyson Hobbs describes in this brilliant, fascinating new study, is itself as fluid, complex, and contradictory as our ideas of race."—Kate Tuttle, The Boston Globe "By investigating the binary lives of the so-called ghosts that exist in American history, Hobbs raises important questions and ideas about race relations and the 'lost' histories of African American communities. "—Cicely Douglas, Library Journal "In narrating the lives of Americans at the border of whiteness, Hobbs illuminates our understanding of our country's tortured race history and of the injustices that drove people to make the ultimate migration—out of the tyranny of enslavement and the terrors of Jim Crow to the costly privilege of the larger white world. Their anguish, alienation, and constant fear of discovery are brilliantly and painfully rendered in this important book, and, through them, we see the arbitrariness of race and the origins of racial divisions that we live with to this day."—Isabel Wilkerson, author of The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration "With remarkable research and deep feeling for her subjects, Hobbs uncovers the stories of countless Americans of African descent who severed their family ties to pass into a world where they would be accorded the privileges of whites. At turns sad, inspiring, and provocative, the book raises important questions about the enduring power of race in American life."—Martha A. Sandweiss, author of Passing Strange: A Gilded Age Tale of Love and Deception Across the Color Line 
Price: 28.45 USD
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15 JOYNER, CHARLES. Down By The Riverside: A South Carolina Slave Community.
University of Illinois Press, Urbana and Chicago: 2009. 25th Anniversary Edition with a new introduction. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
In Down by the Riverside, Charles Joyner takes readers on a journey back in time, up the Waccamaw River through the Lowcountry of South Carolina, past abandoned rice fields once made productive by the labor of enslaved Africans, past rice mills and forest clearings into the antebellum world of All Saints Parish. In this slave community, and many others like it, the slaves created a new language, a new religion--indeed, a new culture--from African traditions and American circumstances. From the letters, diaries, and memoirs of the plantation whites and their guests, from quantitative analysis of census and probate records, and above all from slave folklore and oral history, Joyner has recovered an entire society and its way of life. His careful reconstruction of daily life in All Saints Parish is an inspiring testimony to the ingenuity and solidarity of a people who endured in the face of adversity. This anniversary edition of Joyner's landmark study includes a new introduction in which the author recounts his process of writing the book, reflects on its critical and popular reception, and surveys the past three decades of scholarship in slave history. "Beautifully written and richly suggestive." -- Washington Post Book World "Reaches beyond any other single work in recreating in its pages a texture so fine and full that readers may feel the ribs and twills of slave life. Highest recommendation." -- Library Journal "The finest work ever written on American slavery." -- George P. Rawick, editor of The American Slave: A Composite Autobiography 
Price: 23.75 USD
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16 MILLS, GARY B.; MILLS, ELIZABETH SHOWN (REVISED BY); BURTON, H. SOPHIE (FOREWORD). The Forgotten People: Cane River's Creoles Of Color.
Louisiana State University Press, Baton Rouge and London: 2013. Revised Edition. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Out of colonial Natchitoches, in northwestern Louisiana, emerged a sophisticated and affluent community founded by a family of freed slaves. Their plantations eventually encompassed 18,000 fertile acres, which they tilled alongside hundreds of their own bondsmen. Furnishings of quality and taste graced their homes, and private tutors educated their children. Cultured, deeply religious, and highly capable, Cane River's Creoles of color enjoyed economic privileges but led politically constricted lives. Like their white neighbors, they publicly supported the Confederacy and suffered the same depredations of war and political and social uncertainties of Reconstruction. Unlike white Creoles, however, they did not recover amid cycles of Redeemer and Jim Crow politics. First published in 1977, The Forgotten People offers a socioeconomic history of this widely publicized but also highly romanticized community—a minority group that fit no stereotypes, refused all outside labels, and still struggles to explain its identity in a world mystified by Creolism. Now revised and significantly expanded, this time-honored work revisits Cane River's "forgotten people" and incorporates new findings and insight gleaned across thirty-five years of further research. This new edition provides a nuanced portrayal of the lives of Creole slaves and the roles allowed to freed people of color, tackling issues of race, gender, and slave holding by former slaves. The Forgotten People corrects misassumptions about the origin of key properties in the Cane River National Heritage Area and demonstrates how historians reconstruct the lives of the enslaved, the impoverished, and the disenfranchised. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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17 RUFFIN II, HERBERT G. Uninvited Neighbors: African Americans In Silicon Valley, 1769-1990.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2014. Volume 7 in Race and Culture in the American West. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
How African Americans built communities and fought racial discrimination in the San Francisco Bay Area after World War II In the late 1960s, African American protests and Black Power demonstrations in California's Santa Clara County—including what's now called Silicon Valley—took many observers by surprise. After all, as far back as the 1890s, the California constitution had legally abolished most forms of racial discrimination, and subsequent legal reform had surely taken care of the rest. White Americans might even have wondered where the black activists in the late sixties were coming from—because, beginning with the writings of Fredrick Jackson Turner, the most influential histories of the American West simply left out African Americans or, later, portrayed them as a passive and insignificant presence. Uninvited Neighbors puts black people back into the picture and dispels cherished myths about California's racial history. Reaching from the Spanish era to the valley's emergence as a center of the high-tech industry, this is the first comprehensive history of the African American experience in the Santa Clara Valley. Author Herbert G. Ruffin II's study presents the black experience in a new way, with a focus on how, despite their smaller numbers and obscure presence, African Americans in the South Bay forged communities that had a regional and national impact disproportionate to their population. As the region industrialized and spawned suburbs during and after World War II, its black citizens built institutions such as churches, social clubs, and civil rights organizations and challenged socioeconomic restrictions. Ruffin explores the quest of the area's black people for the postwar American Dream. The book also addresses the scattering of the black community during the region's late yet rapid urban growth after 1950, which led to the creation of several distinct black suburban communities clustered in metropolitan San Jose. Ruffin treats people of color as agents of their own development and survival in a region that was always multiracial and where slavery and Jim Crow did not predominate, but where the white embrace of racial justice and equality was often insincere. The result offers a new view of the intersection of African American history and the history of the American West. 26 black-and-white Illustrations., 6 maps, 9 tables, Hardcover, 360 pages, 6" x 9". Herbert G. Ruffin II is Assistant Professor of History and African American Studies at Syracuse University. 
Price: 33.20 USD
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18 SCOTT, CATHY The Killing Of Tupac Shakur.
Huntington Press, Las Vegas: 1997. 092971217X / 9780929712178 s Softcover. Fair condition. A small corner of the back cover is missing. 
This raw, no-holds-barred account discloses new information, including exclusive photo evidence, about the unsolved murder of Tupac: the failed investigation, the rap wars, the killing of Biggie Smalls, the Bloods-Crips connection, and the many possible motives leading to the murder that rocked the music world. 
Price: 3.71 USD
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19 SPARKS, RANDY J. Africans In The Old South Mapping Exceptional Lives Across The Atlantic World.
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts and London England: 2016. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
The Atlantic slave trade was the largest forced migration in history, and its toll in lives damaged or destroyed is incalculable. Most of those stories are lost to history, making the few that can be reconstructed critical to understanding the trade in all its breadth and variety. Randy J. Sparks examines the experiences of a range of West Africans who lived in the American South between 1740 and 1860. Their stories highlight the diversity of struggles that confronted every African who arrived on American shores. The subjects of Africans in the Old South include Elizabeth Cleveland Hardcastle, the mixed-race daughter of an African slave-trading family who invested in South Carolina rice plantations and slaves, passed as white, and integrated herself into the Lowcountry planter elite; Robert Johnson, kidnapped as a child and sold into slavery in Georgia, who later learned English, won his freedom, and joined the abolition movement in the North; Dimmock Charlton, who bought his freedom after being illegally enslaved in Savannah; and a group of unidentified Africans who were picked up by a British ship in the Caribbean, escaped in Mobile's port, and were recaptured and eventually returned to their homeland. These exceptional lives challenge long-held assumptions about how the slave trade operated and who was involved. The African Atlantic was a complex world characterized by constant movement, intricate hierarchies, and shifting identities. Not all Africans who crossed the Atlantic were enslaved, nor was the voyage always one-way. 224 pages, 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches, 15 maps. "Africans in the Old South is an original and illuminating biographical narrative of six Africans whose diverse and compelling stories challenge us to think deeply about African mobility and resourcefulness across the uneven geographies of Atlantic slavery and abolition."—Sharla M. Fett, author of Working Cures: Healing, Health, and Power on Southern Slave Plantations "Sparks offers fascinating biographies of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century African people moving through North America in ways that subvert and enrich our understanding of race and slavery in the United States."—James Sidbury, author of Becoming African in America 
Price: 25.60 USD
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20 TAYLOR, SUSIE KING; ROMERO, PATRICIA W. (EDITOR); ROSE, WILLIE LEE (NEW INTRODUCTION BY). A Black Woman's Civil War Memoirs: Reminiscences Of My Life In The Camp With The 33rd U.s. Colored Troops, Late 1st South Carolina Volunteers.
Marcus Wiener Publishers, Princeton: 1988. 0910129851 / 9780910129855 s Softcover. Very good condition. 
"A unique human document, shedding light on both black and female historical experiences." - Louis R. Harlan, University of Maryland. 
Price: 5.94 USD
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