Ad Infinitum Books

Quick Search

Title
Author
Description
Keyword
Advanced Search
 
 
 
 

LABOR.

LABOR.

Click on Title to view full description

 
1 Unprotected Labor: Household Workers, Politics, And Middle-class Reform In New York, 1870-1940.
University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill: 2011. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Through an analysis of women's reform, domestic worker activism, and cultural values attached to public and private space, Vanessa May explains how and why domestic workers, the largest category of working women before 1940, were excluded from labor protections that formed the foundation of the welfare state. Looking at the debate over domestic service from both sides of the class divide, Unprotected Labor assesses middle-class women's reform programs as well as household workers' efforts to determine their own working conditions. May argues that working-class women sought to define the middle-class home as a workplace even as employers and reformers regarded the home as private space. The result was that labor reformers left domestic workers out of labor protections that covered other women workers in New York between the late nineteenth century and the New Deal. By recovering the history of domestic workers as activists in the debate over labor legislation, May challenges depictions of domestics as passive workers and reformers as selfless advocates of working women. Unprotected Labor illuminates how the domestic-service debate turned the middle-class home inside out, making private problems public and bringing concerns like labor conflict and government regulation into the middle-class home. Vanessa H. May is assistant professor of history at Seton Hall University in South Orange, New Jersey. "Unprotected Labor is one of those rare books that transforms how we think about a host of issues at the crossroads of women's history and labor history. Vanessa May has provided us with a superb account of the continual salience of 'public' and 'private' as discourse, space, and embodied experience. Class conflict in the home has found its scribe." --Eileen Boris, University of California, Santa Barbara "Vanessa May vividly depicts the contradictions and ironies inherent in the relationships of domestic workers and the women who employed them. She explores the ways in which domestic workers resisted exploitation and the irony of middle-class women who fought for reform for industrial workers but not for the workers in their own homes. Their failure shows the importance of the public-private divide and the limitations of liberal reform." --Rebecca Sharpless, Texas Christian University, author of Cooking in Other Women's Kitchens: Domestic Workers in the South, 1865-1960 
Price: 28.45 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
2 Unprotected Labor: Household Workers, Politics, And Middle-class Reform In New York, 1870-1940.
University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill: 2011. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Through an analysis of women's reform, domestic worker activism, and cultural values attached to public and private space, Vanessa May explains how and why domestic workers, the largest category of working women before 1940, were excluded from labor protections that formed the foundation of the welfare state. Looking at the debate over domestic service from both sides of the class divide, Unprotected Labor assesses middle-class women's reform programs as well as household workers' efforts to determine their own working conditions. May argues that working-class women sought to define the middle-class home as a workplace even as employers and reformers regarded the home as private space. The result was that labor reformers left domestic workers out of labor protections that covered other women workers in New York between the late nineteenth century and the New Deal. By recovering the history of domestic workers as activists in the debate over labor legislation, May challenges depictions of domestics as passive workers and reformers as selfless advocates of working women. Unprotected Labor illuminates how the domestic-service debate turned the middle-class home inside out, making private problems public and bringing concerns like labor conflict and government regulation into the middle-class home. Vanessa H. May is assistant professor of history at Seton Hall University in South Orange, New Jersey. "Unprotected Labor is one of those rare books that transforms how we think about a host of issues at the crossroads of women's history and labor history. Vanessa May has provided us with a superb account of the continual salience of 'public' and 'private' as discourse, space, and embodied experience. Class conflict in the home has found its scribe." --Eileen Boris, University of California, Santa Barbara "Vanessa May vividly depicts the contradictions and ironies inherent in the relationships of domestic workers and the women who employed them. She explores the ways in which domestic workers resisted exploitation and the irony of middle-class women who fought for reform for industrial workers but not for the workers in their own homes. Their failure shows the importance of the public-private divide and the limitations of liberal reform." --Rebecca Sharpless, Texas Christian University, author of Cooking in Other Women's Kitchens: Domestic Workers in the South, 1865-1960 
Price: 61.75 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
3 ALINSKY, SAUL. John L. Lewis: An Unauthorized Biography.
G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York: 1949. First Edition (Unstated). h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition considering its age. 
Dramatically, from personal acquaintance and lewis's own files, Saul Alinsky writes here the inside story of one of the most powerful men in America. Its revelations of why Lewis broke with Roosevelt, of why he fought with AF of L to form the CIO, of the birth of the sit-down strikes, of the motives behind the war strikes, of how Lewis so often managed to stalemate the U.S. Government - these are front-page news. They are brought out with sharp insight by one of the most brilliant observers of the labor movement in the United States. Includes an Index. 
Price: 37.95 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
4 ARGYLE, MICHAEL. The Social Psychology Of Work.
Taplinger Publishing Company, New York: 1972. 0800872436 / 9780800872434 First American Edition. h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Very good condition. 
Considers almost every aspect of work. Argyle's topics include the need for status, problems arising from technical innovation, problems of the foreman, interviewing and selection, what kind of personality is best for which job, creative groups, not wanting to work, organizational psychology, and comparison of working conditions in Israel, Yugoslavia, Japan and Great Britain. Includes an Index. 
Price: 19.19 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
5 BERNSTEIN, DAVID E. Rehabilitating Lochner: Defending Individual Rights Against Progressive Reform.
University of Chicago Press, Chicago and London: 2011. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
In this timely reevaluation of an infamous Supreme Court decision, David E. Bernstein provides a compelling survey of the history and background of Lochner v. New York. This 1905 decision invalidated state laws limiting work hours and became the leading case contending that novel economic regulations were unconstitutional. Sure to be controversial, Rehabilitating Lochner argues that the decision was well grounded in precedent—and that modern constitutional jurisprudence owes at least as much to the limited-government ideas of Lochner proponents as to the more expansive vision of its Progressive opponents. Tracing the influence of this decision through subsequent battles over segregation laws, sex discrimination, civil liberties, and more, Rehabilitating Lochner argues not only that the court acted reasonably in Lochner, but that Lochner and like-minded cases have been widely misunderstood and unfairly maligned ever since. "An exhilarating book full of interesting new perspectives. Rehabilitating Lochner will change the way people think about the transition from the late nineteenth century to the modern New Deal and Civil Rights regime. It does what good revisionist history should do: see what is familiar in new ways."—Jack M. Balkin, Yale Law School "David Bernstein drives home powerfully and convincingly the fact that the supporters of Lochner were the biggest proponents of protecting the personal rights of African Americans, Roman Catholics, and other minorities. Rehabilitating Lochner will have a profound impact on constitutional law scholarship."—William E. Nelson, New York University "A terrific work of historical revisionism, Rehabilitating Lochner brings out some attractive resonances in libertarian themes associated with the widely disparaged constitutional jurisprudence of the period from 1905 to 1937, and some discordant undertones to the Progressive themes sounded during that period. It should induce some changes in the way many students and scholars read the cases from that period."—Mark Tushnet, Harvard Law School "As every law student knows, Lochner was a case in which a court packed with business sympathizers stuck it to the little guy in a shameless display of judicial activism. But, like a surprisingly large number of things everyone knows, this conventional wisdom is almost entirely wrong, and David E. Bernstein's new book, Rehabilitating Lochner, makes clear just how wrong it is — and how and why the Lochner narrative became established in the legal academy. . . . The false narrative of Lochner has controlled the past for decades but Bernstein's clear and incisive work may wrest that control away and move us back to the truth." — Glenn Reynolds, Commentary "[Bernstein] attempts the grand task of "correcting decades of erroneous accounts" and succeeds with aplomb, and notable timeliness. The story of how Joseph Lochner fought legislators and unions to bake his goods in freedom goes especially well with tea." — National Review "Rehabilitating Lochner is intellectual history in its highest form. . . . Bernstein has done nothing less than explode the myth of Lochner, a decision that any pro-liberty student of American constitutional law should embrace. This is a book that will transform the way constitutional law is understood for years to come." — EH.net 
Price: 42.75 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
6 BRUDNEY, JULIET F. & SCOTT, HILDA. Forced Out: When Veteran Employees Are Driven From Their Careers.
Simon and Schuster, Inc., New York: 1987. Fireside Book Edition. s Softcover. Good condition. 
It may have happened to you, a member of your family, or someone you work with. In corporations, small businesses and other organizations, managers, professionals, technicians and other white-collar workers with years of experience and sterling employment records are being coerced into early retirement. Forced Out explores this alarming trend in the American workplace. Includes an Index. "The authors handle a wealth of material with clarity and style. A good book." -- John Tarrant, author of Perks and Parachutes 
Price: 11.12 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
7 BUEHR, WALTER. Underground Riches: The Story Of Mining.
William Morrow and Company, Inc. New York: 1958. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good reading copy. Library reject with usual stamping and labels. 

Price: 6.89 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
8 EHRENREICH, BARBARA. Nickel And Dimed: On ( Not ) Getting By In America.
Henry Holt and Company, New York: 2001. 0805063897 / 9780805063899 Seventeenth Printing. s Softcover. Very good condition. 
Millions of American work full-time, year-round, for poverty-level wages. Barbara Ehrenreich decided to join them, inspired in part by the rhetoric surrounding welfare reform, whch promised that any job equals a better life. But how can anyone survive, let alone prosper, on six or seven dollars an hour? To find out, Ehrenreich moved from Florida to Maine to Minnesota, taking the cheapest lodgings available and accepting work as a waitress, hotel maid, house cleaner, nusing home aid, and Wal-Mart salesperson. She soon discovered that even the "lowliest" ocupations require exhausting mental and physical efforts. And one job is not enough; you need at least two if yu intend to live indoors. "Jarring, full of riveting grit . . . This book is already unforgettable." - Susannah Meadows, Newsweek 
Price: 3.36 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
9 FONER, PHILIP S. & SCHULTZ, REINHARD. The Other America: Art And The Labour Movement In The United States.
Journeyman Press, London: 1985. 0904526941 / 9780904526943 Shortened reprint edition. s Softcover. Very good condition. 
Presents the most extensively documented visual history of the art of the American labor movement yet published. Many reproductions trace the work of artists and photographers to reflect the lives of ordinary people: from one of the earliest representations of industrial labor by John Ferguson Weir in 1866, to Edward Hopper, Ben Shahn, Rockwell Kent, Charles White, and contemporary artists like Ralph Fasanella and Susan Ortega. 
Price: 61.28 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
10 FONES-WOLF, ELIZABETH; FONES-WOLF, KEN. Struggle For The Soul Of The Postwar South: White Evangelical Protestants And Operation Dixie.
University of Illinois Press, Urbana and Chicago: 2015. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Religion's role in the ill-fated struggle to unionize white workers in the South In 1946, the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) undertook Operation Dixie, an initiative to recruit industrial workers in the American South. Elizabeth and Ken Fones-Wolf plumb rarely used archival sources and rich oral histories to explore the CIO's fraught encounter with the evangelical Protestantism and religious culture of southern whites. The authors' nuanced look at working-class religion reveals how laborers across the surprisingly wide evangelical spectrum interpreted their lives through their faith. Factors like conscience, community need, and lived experience led individual preachers to become union activists and mill villagers to defy the foreman and minister alike to listen to organizers. As the authors show, however, all sides enlisted belief in the battle. In the end, the inability of northern organizers to overcome the suspicion with which many evangelicals viewed modernity played a key role in Operation Dixie's failure, with repercussions for labor and liberalism that are still being felt today. Identifying the role of the sacred in the struggle for southern economic justice, and placing class as a central aspect in southern religion, Struggle for the Soul of the Postwar South provides new understandings of how whites in the region wrestled with the options available to them during a crucial period of change and possibility. Elizabeth Fones-Wolf is a professor of history at West Virginia University and the author of Waves of Opposition: Labor, Business, and the Struggle for Democratic Radio, 1933-1958. Ken Fones-Wolf is the Stuart and Joyce Robbins Chair of history at West Virginia University and the author of Glass Towns: Industry, Labor, and Political Economy in Central Appalachia, 1890-1930s. "Elizabeth and Ken Fones-Wolf have produced the best book yet written on southern religious culture and its fateful intersection with the American labor movement during the crucial years when the twentieth-century fate of organized labor hung in the balance. This book is a treasure."--Joseph A. McCartin, author of Collision Course: Ronald Reagan, the Air Traffic Controllers, and the Strike that Changed America "A landmark study. The authors use this insightful and often surprising history to shed new light on the failure of Operation Dixie between 1946 and 1953. In doing so, they deepen our understanding of the relationship between evangelical Christianity and southern labor history, as well as between religion and working-class conservatism, race relations, and anti-unionism."--Jarod Roll, author of Spirit of Rebellion: Labor and Religion in the New Cotton South "The authors have accomplished the rare feat of gracefully combining labor, social, and religious history into a seamless whole, and in the process explaining a story and a tragedy has cried out for such an explanation. This will be essential reading for those interested in southern, labor, and American religious history, and for those who want to think hard about how religious traditions interact with movements for social justice."--Paul Harvey, co-author of The Color of Christ: The Son of God and the Saga of Race in America This book has been made possible through grants from the West Virginia Humanities Council, a state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and from West Virginia University. Any views, findings, or recommendations do not necessarily represent those of the West Virginia Humanities Council or the National Endowment for the Humanities. 
Price: 23.75 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
11 FONES-WOLF, ELIZABETH; FONES-WOLF, KEN. Struggle For The Soul Of The Postwar South: White Evangelical Protestants And Operation Dixie.
University of Illinois Press, Urbana and Chicago: 2015. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Religion's role in the ill-fated struggle to unionize white workers in the South In 1946, the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) undertook Operation Dixie, an initiative to recruit industrial workers in the American South. Elizabeth and Ken Fones-Wolf plumb rarely used archival sources and rich oral histories to explore the CIO's fraught encounter with the evangelical Protestantism and religious culture of southern whites. The authors' nuanced look at working-class religion reveals how laborers across the surprisingly wide evangelical spectrum interpreted their lives through their faith. Factors like conscience, community need, and lived experience led individual preachers to become union activists and mill villagers to defy the foreman and minister alike to listen to organizers. As the authors show, however, all sides enlisted belief in the battle. In the end, the inability of northern organizers to overcome the suspicion with which many evangelicals viewed modernity played a key role in Operation Dixie's failure, with repercussions for labor and liberalism that are still being felt today. Identifying the role of the sacred in the struggle for southern economic justice, and placing class as a central aspect in southern religion, Struggle for the Soul of the Postwar South provides new understandings of how whites in the region wrestled with the options available to them during a crucial period of change and possibility. Elizabeth Fones-Wolf is a professor of history at West Virginia University and the author of Waves of Opposition: Labor, Business, and the Struggle for Democratic Radio, 1933-1958. Ken Fones-Wolf is the Stuart and Joyce Robbins Chair of history at West Virginia University and the author of Glass Towns: Industry, Labor, and Political Economy in Central Appalachia, 1890-1930s. "Elizabeth and Ken Fones-Wolf have produced the best book yet written on southern religious culture and its fateful intersection with the American labor movement during the crucial years when the twentieth-century fate of organized labor hung in the balance. This book is a treasure."--Joseph A. McCartin, author of Collision Course: Ronald Reagan, the Air Traffic Controllers, and the Strike that Changed America "A landmark study. The authors use this insightful and often surprising history to shed new light on the failure of Operation Dixie between 1946 and 1953. In doing so, they deepen our understanding of the relationship between evangelical Christianity and southern labor history, as well as between religion and working-class conservatism, race relations, and anti-unionism."--Jarod Roll, author of Spirit of Rebellion: Labor and Religion in the New Cotton South "The authors have accomplished the rare feat of gracefully combining labor, social, and religious history into a seamless whole, and in the process explaining a story and a tragedy has cried out for such an explanation. This will be essential reading for those interested in southern, labor, and American religious history, and for those who want to think hard about how religious traditions interact with movements for social justice."--Paul Harvey, co-author of The Color of Christ: The Son of God and the Saga of Race in America This book has been made possible through grants from the West Virginia Humanities Council, a state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and from West Virginia University. Any views, findings, or recommendations do not necessarily represent those of the West Virginia Humanities Council or the National Endowment for the Humanities. 
Price: 90.25 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
12 LEVIN, NORA. While Messiah Tarried: Jewish Socialist Movements, 1871-1917.
Schocken Books, New York: 1977. h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Good reading copy with underlining and notes on back end paper. 
"Three important Jewish socialist movements developed in the late nineteenth century - in Russia, in the United States, and in Palestine." And so begins While Messiah Tarried. 
Price: 69.11 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
13 MADISON, CHARLES A. American Labor Leaders: Personalities And Forces In The Labor Movement.
Frederick Unger Publishing Co., New York 1962. Second Enlarged Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. The dustjacket has stains and is slightly torn. 
An illuminating survey of men who represent every significant aspect of organized labor, with a review of major developments since 1950. Includes an Index. 
Price: 28.50 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
14 MCCARTIN, JOSEPH A. Collision Course: Ronald Reagan, The Air Traffic Controllers, And The Strike That Changed America.
Oxford University Press, New York/Oxford/London: . 0199836787 / 9780199836789 h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
In August 1981, the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization (PATCO) called an illegal strike. The new president, Ronald Reagan, fired the strikers, establishing a reputation for both decisiveness and hostility to organized labor. As Joseph A. McCartin writes, the strike was the culmination of two decades of escalating conflict between controllers and the government that stemmed from the high-pressure nature of the job and the controllers' inability to negotiate with their employer over vital issues. PATCO's fall not only ushered in a long period of labor decline; it also served as a harbinger of the campaign against public sector unions that now roils American politics. Collision Course sets the strike within a vivid panorama of the rise of the world's busiest air-traffic control system. It begins with an arresting account of the 1960 midair collision over New York that cost 134 lives and exposed the weaknesses of an overburdened system. Through the stories of controllers like Mike Rock and Jack Maher, who were galvanized into action by that disaster and went on to found PATCO, it describes the efforts of those who sought to make the airways safer and fought to win a secure place in the American middle class. It climaxes with the story of Reagan and the controllers, who surprisingly endorsed the Republican on the promise that he would address their grievances. That brief, fateful alliance triggered devastating miscalculations that changed America, forging patterns that still govern the nation's labor politics. Written with an eye for detail and a grasp of the vast consequences of the PATCO conflict for both air travel and America's working class, Collision Course is a stunning achievement. Features * A deeply researched narrative of an important turning point in labor relations in the U.S. Joseph A. McCartin is Associate Professor of History at Georgetown University and Director of the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor. "Mr. McCartin deals with policy but also with personalities, and the book is better for it. For anyone at all interested in labor or business history, I recommend it. " - The New York Times "[C]onvincing...draws a vivid picture of a culture and how, as much as the realities an organization faces, that culture can determine the group's behavior." - The Philadelphia Inquirer "The Air Traffic Controllers strike of 1981 was one of the most important struggles in American history, and by breaking the union, Ronald Reagan dealt a blow to organized labor from which it has still not recovered. If you care about the labor movement, you need to read Collision Course and even if you don't, you'll be transfixed by the drama of McCartin's story-telling." - E.J. Dionne, syndicated columnist and author of Why Americans Hate Politics "The definitive account of the PATCO strike...Collision Course's treatment of worker and political power should help inform trade unions' strategies today, and perhaps prompt discussion of how to revitalize the greatest source of worker power: the strike." - In These Times "The air traffic controllers' strike in August 1981 was a defining moment for the Reagan presidency and the American labor movement. By firing the air traffic controllers, and successfully replacing them, Reagan heralded the end of a political era when labor unions - and the workers they represented - were an integral part of the American social contract. Joseph McCartin tells the story in gripping detail. It's must reading for anyone interested in the recent history of American politics and labor relations." - John B. Judis, author of The Folly of Empire "The signal event in the evisceration of the American middle class was Ronald Reagan's breaking the air traffic controllers' strike in 1981. In Collision Course, Joe McCartin brilliantly and compellingly tells this tragic tale, and situates it in the broader narrative of middle-class America's long and sickening decline." - Harold Meyerson, Editor-at-Large of The American Prospect and op-ed columnist for The Washington Post "In an age of obscurantist academic historical writing, Collision Course stands out as a model of accessible and relevant scholarship." - National Review 
Price: 71.25 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
15 MCCULLOUGH, FRANK. Strike!: A Confidential Report On Labor-management Conflict By An Undercover Agent.
The American Press, New York: 1954. First Edition. h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Fair condition. Cover is faded. 

Price: 17.58 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
16 MCWILLIAMS, CARREY. Ill Fares The Land: Migrants And Migratory Labor In The United States.
Little, Brown and Company, Boston: 1942. First Edition. h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Good condition considering its age. Cover has natural discolaration due to age. 

Price: 42.75 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
17 MITCHELL, H. L.; MITCHELL, SAMUEL (FOREWORD). Mean Things Happening In This Land: The Life And Times Of H. L. Mitchell, Co-founder Of The Southern Tenant Farmers Union. H. L. Mitchell Foreword By: Samuel Mitchell
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2008. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
A rare firsthand chronicle of one of the most racially progressive unions in twentieth-century America When, during the Great Depression, tenant farmers and sharecroppers were pushed off the land they had worked but never owned, many sought power in numbers by organizing unions. In 1934, seven black men and eleven white men organized the Southern Tenant Farmers Union. Socialist Harry Leland Mitchell was one of those men. Mean Things Happening in This Land is his autobiographical account of SFTU struggles—against poverty, New Deal agencies, communists, and above all, the southern planter class—to achieve economic justice in the cotton fields. In addition to its original foreword, by renowned socialist intellectual Michael Harrington, this edition contains a new preface by Samuel Mitchell and the author's posthumous corrections and additions. H. L. Mitchell (1906-89) was briefly a sharecropper in Tennessee before cofounding the STFU and becoming a labor organizer. 
Price: 18.95 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
18 ROSENBERG, DANIEL. New Orleans Dockworkers: Race, Labor, And Unionism 1892 - 1923.
State University of New York Press, Albany: 1988. 0887066496 / 9780887066498 First Edition. SUNY Series in American Labor History. h Hardcover, no dustjacket, Very good condition. Gift inscription on front endpaper possibly by author. 
Investigates the conditions which made possible a remarkable instance of Black-white solidarity, and contributes to the study of lower-class interracial cooperation during an especially difficult period in race relations. Includes an Index. 
Price: 29.17 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
19 ROSENZWEIG, ROY. Eight Hours For What We Will - Workers And Leisure In An Industrial City, 1870-1920.
Cambridge University Press, NY: 1986. 052131397X / 9780521313971 Reprint. s Softcover. Library discard. Good condition. 
The first comprehensive study of American working-class recreation, focusing on the saloons, amusement parks, and movie houses of Worcester, MA between 1870 and 1920. Includes an Index. 
Price: 28.36 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
20 SCHOR, JUDITH B. The Overworked American: The Unexpected Decline Of Leisure.
Basic Books, New York: 1991. 0465054331 / 9780465054336 h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 
This pathbreaking book documents for the first time the unanticipated decline in leisure both at work and at home. Includes an Index. 
Price: 8.55 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
  1  2  NEXT >  


Questions, comments, or suggestions
Please write to adinfinitumbooks@yahoo.com
Copyright©2017. All Rights Reserved.
Powered by ChrisLands.com

 

 

cookie