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LATIN AMERICA.

LATIN AMERICA.

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1 ALONZO, JUAN J. Badmen Bandits And Folk Heroes: The Ambivalence Of Mexican American Identity In Literature And Film.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson . h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Badmen, Bandits, and Folk Heroes is a comparative study of the literary and cinematic representation of Mexican American masculine identity from early twentieth-century adventure stories and movie Westerns through contemporary self-representations by Chicano/a writers and filmmakers. In this deeply compelling book, Juan J. Alonzo proposes a reconsideration of the early stereotypical depictions of Mexicans in fiction and film: rather than viewing stereotypes as unrelentingly negative, Alonzo presents them as part of a complex apparatus of identification and disavowal. Furthermore, Alonzo reassesses Chicano/a self-representation in literature and film, and argues that the Chicano/a expression of identity is characterized less by essentialism than by an acknowldgement of the contingent status of present-day identity formations. Alonzo opens his provocative study with a fresh look at the adventure stories of Stephen Crane and the silent Western movies of D. W. Griffith. He also investigates the conflation of the greaser, the bandit, and the Mexican revolutionary into one villainous figure in early Western movies and, more broadly, traces the development of the badman in Westerns. He newly interrogates the writings of Américo Paredes regarding the makeup of Mexican masculinity, and productively trains his analytic eye on the recent films of Jim Mendiola and the contemporary poetry of Evangelina Vigil. Throughout Badmen, Bandits, and Folk Heroes, Alonzo convincingly demonstrates how fiction and films that formerly appeared one-dimensional in their treatment of Mexicans and Mexican Americans actually offer surprisingly multifarious and ambivalent representations. At the same time, his valuation of indeterminacy, contingency, and hybridity in contemporary cultural production creates new possibilities for understanding identity formation. 
Price: 47.50 USD
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2 ANDREWS, GEORGE REID. The Nathan I. Huggins Lectures: Afro-latin America: Black Lives, 1600-2000.
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts and London England: 2016. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Of the almost 11 million Africans who came to the Americas between 1500 and 1870, two-thirds came to Spanish America and Brazil. Over four centuries, Africans and their descendants—both free and enslaved—participated in the political, social, and cultural movements that indelibly shaped their countries' colonial and post-independence pasts. Yet until very recently Afro-Latin Americans were conspicuously excluded from narratives of their hemisphere's history. George Reid Andrews seeks to redress this damaging omission by making visible the past and present lives and labors of black Latin Americans in their New World home. He cogently reconstructs the Afro-Latin heritage from the paper trail of slavery and freedom, from the testimonies of individual black men and women, from the writings of visiting African-Americans, and from the efforts of activists and scholars of the twentieth century to bring the Afro-Latin heritage fully into public view. While most Latin American countries have acknowledged the legacy of slavery, the story still told throughout the region is one of "racial democracy"—the supposedly successful integration and acceptance of African descendants into society. From the 1970s to today, black civil rights movements have challenged that narrative and demanded that its promises of racial equality be made real. They have also called for fuller acknowledgment of Afro-Latin Americans' centrality in their countries' national histories. Afro-Latin America brings that story up to the present, examining debates currently taking place throughout the region on how best to achieve genuine racial equality. 136 pages, 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches, 2 maps, 2 graphs, 4 tables. George Reid Andrews is Distinguished Professor of History at the University of Pittsburgh. "Black lives matter in Latin American history. Reid Andrews gives us the state of the art, and then probes beyond it. This is classic Andrews, hands on the evidence, head around the big picture, a lover of paradox. Both a masterful introduction for the newly curious and a master class for old hands like me."—John Charles Chasteen, author of Born in Blood and Fire: A Concise History of Latin America "Beautifully written by an eminent scholar, Afro-Latin America provides readers with new approaches to understanding the African diaspora in the Americas. George Reid Andrews masterfully shows that there is no area of the hemisphere that has not been touched by people of African descent. "—Jeffrey Lesser, author of Immigration, Ethnicity, and National Identity in Brazil 
Price: 23.70 USD
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3 ANDRIEN, KENNETH. Andean Worlds: Indigenous History, Culture, And Consciousness Under Spanish Rule, 1532-1825
University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque. Diálogos Series of Latin American Studies. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
This broadly gauged, synthetic study examines how the Spanish invasion of the Inca Empire (called Tawintinsuyu) in 1532 brought dramatic and irreversible transformations in traditional Andean modes of production, technology, politics, religion, culture, and social hierarchies. At the same time, Professor Andrien explains how the indigenous peoples merged these changes with their own political, socioeconomic, and religious traditions. In this way European and indigenous life ways became intertwined, producing a new and constantly evolving hybrid colonial order in the Andes. After beginning with a study of Tawintinsuyu on the eve of the Spanish invasion, Andrien then presents the salient topics in Andean colonial history: the emergence of the colonial state; the colonial socioeconomic order; indigenous culture and society; Spanish attempts to impose Roman Catholic orthodoxy; and Andean resistance, rebellion, and political consciousness. By drawing on his own research and the contributions from scholars in many disciplines, Kenneth J. Andrien offers a masterful interpretation of Andean colonial history, one of the most dynamic and creative fields in Latin American studies. "This is a clearly written, comprehensive, and well-balanced account. . . particularly in discussions of the often vexed and central question of Spanish versus Native American issues."--Peter J. Bakewell, Edmund and Louise Kahn Professor of History, Southern Methodist University. Kenneth J. Andrien is the author of Crisis and Decline: The Viceroyalty of Perus in the Seventeenth Century (UNM Press), and The Kingdom of Quito, 1690-1830: The State and Regional Development. "Andean Worlds would serve as an excellent introduction to Andean colonial history and/or Indigenous culture, history, economics, and politics. This book would also be of interest to those interested in colonial studies more generally. . . . Few scholars are able to succesfully present this type of 'big picture' analysis of nearly three centuries of history but Andrien's book is intellectually stimulating while being both concise and readable." -- Indigenous Nations Studies Journal "Andrien does an excellent job of synthesizing the best original scholarship, while always bringing out the most interesting anecdotes and characters." -- Hispanic American Historical Review "Kenneth J. Andrien's Andean Worlds: Indigenous History, Culture and Consciousness under Spanish Rule, 1532-1825 is a well-written, accessible volume that traces the history of the Andean people and their culture before and during Spanish rule." -- Sixteenth Century Journal "Andrien's Andean Worlds is an impressive synthetic work that integrates a vast amount of scholarship from all fields to give a comprehensive picture of the experiences of native Andeans under colonialism. The book is not only packed with information; it is clearly and elegantly written." -- Journal of Interdisciplinary History 6 x 9 in., 17 halftones, 5 maps. 
Price: 28.45 USD
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4 AREVALO, JUAN JOSE; COBB, JUNE & OSEGUEDA, DR. RAUL(TRANSLATORS) The Shark And The Sardines.
Lyle Stuart, New York: 1961. Third Printing. h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Good condition. 

Price: 14.01 USD
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5 BASSIE-SWEET, KAREN (EDITOR), WITH ROBERT M. LAUGHLIN, NICHOLAS A. HOPKINS, & ANDRÉS BRIZUELA CASIMIR. The Ch'ol Maya Of Chiapas
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2015. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
By: Sergio Quezada Politics of the Maya Court By: Sarah Jackson DESCRIPTION AUTHOR BIO REVIEWS/PRAISE The Ch'ol Maya who live in the western Mexican state of Chiapas are direct descendants of the Maya of the Classic Period. Exploring their history and culture, volume editor Karen Bassie-Sweet and the other authors assembled here uncover clear continuity between contemporary Maya rituals and beliefs and their ancient counterparts. With evocative and thoughtful essays by leading scholars of Maya culture, The Ch'ol Maya of Chiapas, the first collection to focus fully on the Ch'ol Maya, takes readers deep into ancient caves and reveals new dimensions of Ch'ol cosmology. In contemporary Ch'ol culture the contributors find a wealth of historical material that they then interweave with archaeological data to yield surprising and illuminating insights. The colonial and twentieth-century descendants of the Post-Classic Period Ch'ol and Lacandon Ch'ol, for instance, provide a window on the history and conquest of the early Maya. Several authors examine Early Classic paintings in the Ch'ol ritual cave known as Jolja that document ancient cave ceremonies not unlike Ch'ol rituals performed today, such as petitioning a cave-dwelling mountain spirit for health, rain, and abundant harvests. Other essays investigate deities identified with caves, mountains, lightning, and meteors to trace the continuity of ancient Maya beliefs through the centuries, in particular the ancient origin of contemporary rituals centering on the Ch'ol mountain deity Don Juan. An appendix containing three Ch'ol folktales and their English translations rounds out the volume. Charting paths literal and figurative to earlier trade routes, pre-Columbian sites, and ancient rituals and beliefs, The Ch'ol Maya of Chiapas opens a fresh, richly informed perspective on Maya culture as it has evolved and endured over the ages. 27 black-and-white Illustrations, 11 maps, 288 pages, 7" x 10". Karen Bassie-Sweet is Research Associate at the University of Calgary and codirects the Jolja Cave Project in Mexico. She is author of Maya Sacred Geography and the Creator Deities. "This pioneering, in-depth study of the Ch'ol Maya reveals the dynamism of a great indigenous people who have refused to abandon their cultural identity through centuries of repression and exploitation and have persisted until our own time. A must-read for every student of the Maya!"—Michael D. Coe, author of Breaking the Maya Code 
Price: 42.75 USD
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6 BEALS, CARLETON. The Coming Struggle For Latin America.
J. B. Lippincott, Philadelphia: 1938. h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Good condition. 
Details the political and sociological workings that have helped Latin America with special accents on War, Fascism, Imperialism and other topics. Includes an Index. 
Price: 15.91 USD
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7 BENADUCI, LORENZO BOTURINI; SCHROEDER, SUSAN (FOREWORD). Idea Of A New General History Of North America: An Account Of Colonial Native Mexico.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2015. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
A Spaniard originally from Italy, the polymath Lorenzo Boturini Benaduci (1702-1753), known as Boturini, traveled to New Spain in 1736. Becoming fascinated by the Mesoamerican cultures of the New World, he collected and copied native writings—and learned Nahuatl, the language in which most of these documents were written. Boturini's incomparable collection—confiscated, neglected, and dispersed after the Spanish crown condemned his intellectual pursuits—became the basis of his Idea of a New General History of North America. The volume, completed in 1746 and written almost entirely from memory, is presented here in English for the first time, along with the Catálogo, Boturini's annotated enumeration of the works he had gathered in New Spain. Stafford Poole's lucid and nuanced translation of the Idea and Catálogo allows Anglophone readers to fully appreciate Boturini's unique accomplishment and his unparalleled and sympathetic knowledge of the native peoples of eighteenth-century Mexico. Poole's introduction puts Boturini's feat of memory and scholarship into historical context: Boturini was documenting the knowledge and skills of native Americans whom most Europeans were doing their utmost to denigrate. Through extensive, thoughtful annotations, Poole clarifies Boturini's references to Greco-Roman mythology, authors from classical antiquity, humanist works, ecclesiastical and legal sources, and terms in Nahuatl, Spanish, Latin, and Italian. In his notes to the Catálogo, he points readers to transcriptions and translations of the original materials in Boturini's archive that exist today. Invaluable for the new light they shed on Mesoamerican language, knowledge, culture, and religious practices, the Idea of a New General History of North America and the Catálogo also offer a rare perspective on the intellectual practices and prejudices of the Bourbon era—and on one of the most curious and singular minds of the time. Stafford Poole, C.M., an ordained Roman Catholic priest, is the author of Our Lady of Guadalupe: The Origins and Sources of a Mexican National Symbol, 1531-1797 and Juan de Ovando: Governing the Spanish Empire in the Reign of Philip II. SusanSchroeder is Professor Emeritus of History at Tulane University and coeditor of Indian Women of Early Mexico and Chimalpahin's Conquest: A Nahua Historian's Rewriting of Francisco Lopez de Comara's "La Conquista de Mexico." "This accessible, engaging book is a highly valuable contribution to the intellectual history of Latin America, to the history of Mesoamerican scholarship in colonial times, and to the historiography and analysis of primary sources for colonial Latin America." —David Tavárez, author of The Invisible War: Indigenous Devotions, Discipline, and Dissent in Colonial Mexico 
Price: 42.75 USD
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8 BRISTOL, JOAN CAMERON. Christians, Blasphemers, And Witches: Afro-mexican Ritual Practice In The Seventeenth Century.
University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The decline of the native population following the Spanish conquest of New Spain in 1521, among other factors, led to an increased demand for African slaves to add to the labor force and bolster the colonial economy. Approximately two hundred thousand Africans were imported into Mexico from Spain and from West and West Central Africa during the course of the slave trade. These "Afro-Mexicans" encompassed a great variety of individuals and experiences whose ritual lives differed as much as their backgrounds. Some were Christians who took communion, confessed, and celebrated Mass. Some were blasphemers who were denounced to the Inquisition. Still others were practitioners of mystical rites meant to cure illness, attract lovers, or control owners. Focusing on the time period from the intensification of slave importation in 1580 to approximately 1700, Joan Bristol presents information from Mexican Inquisition documents. Christians, Blasphemers, and Witches explores how Afro-Mexicans worked within the limitations imposed on them by the Church and the Spanish Crown in order to develop relationships with peers and superiors, defend themselves against unjust treatment, make money, and gain prestige on the local level. Joan Cameron Bristol is assistant professor of history, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia. Christians, Blasphemers, and Witches is her first book. "Bristol is at her best when treating her various case studies--particularly in the blasphemy and witchcraft chapters--where she employs gender, calidad, and religiosity to explore individual Afromexicans' experiences. Those case studies and her readable prose mean that undergraduates will find this accessible, stimulating reading as will specialists of colonial Latin America and the Black Atlantic." -- The Americas "...[a] finely tuned study....Bristol's work is vital..."-- Catholic Historical Review "Well-written...this book should find a home in the libraries not only of our colleges and universities but also those of students and scholars of African-based religions in the Americas, early colonial Christianity and cross-cultural religious impacts."-- Religious Studies Review 
Price: 28.45 USD
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9 BRUNDAGE, BURR CARTWRIGHT. Empire Of The Inca.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
A great account of a classic Indian civilization, this book tells the story of a people who, hatched in a small pocket of the Peruvian sierra, rose in the end to become the architects and chief beneficiaries of an empire they called Tahuantinsuyo, the Four Quarters. Tahuantinsuyo, with Cuzco as its highly respected seat of government and the official residence of the ruling Inca, was a sacred empire. Its territorial aggrandizement was a function of its religious mission, while, reciprocally, its thirst for power dictated what were to be the lineaments of its most holy beliefs. When the sense of divine mission began to fail, the empire incontinently collapsed. But the history of the Inca Empire was more than just a prelude to the Spanish conquest under Francisco Pizarro in 1532. The swift creation of the remarkable state is important in that it is in no way related to the traditions of the European and Asiatic empires. Further, even though the Incas were a people few in numbers, they succeeded in creating a highly bureaucratic organization exceedingly rich in religious ceremonialism. The Incas, dwelling in the highlands of modern Peru, were consolidated by Manco Capac perhaps as early as the eleventh century. Under the rule of a despotic head, known as the Inca, the empire was expanded by Pachacuti, Topa Inca, Huayna Capac, and others up to Atahualpa, until it extended from northern Ecuador to central Chile. The story of this expansion and the description of all the Incas' life, from their religious beliefs and rituals to a discussion of their engineering prowess in their still-existent Royal Road, is fascinating reading. 
Price: 28.45 USD
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10 CABOT, JOHN M.; SMITH, WALTER BEDELL (INTRODUCTION). Toward Our Common American Destiny: Speeches And Interviews On Latin America Problems, 1953-1954.
Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Baltimore: 1955. h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Good condition. 
Includes speeches and interviews on Latin America problems, 1953-1954, by the Assistant Secretary of State for Inter-American Affairs. 
Price: 209.95 USD
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11 CÁRDENAS, JAVIER VALDEZ & TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH BY EVERARD MEADE. The Taken: True Stories Of The Sinaloa Drug War.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2017. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
A massive wave of violence has rippled across Mexico over the past decade. In the western state of Sinaloa, the birthplace of modern drug trafficking, ordinary citizens live in constant fear of being "taken"—kidnapped or held against their will by armed men, whether criminals, police, or both. This remarkable collection of firsthand accounts by prize-winning journalist Javier Valdez Cárdenas provides a uniquely human perspective on life in Sinaloa during the drug war. The reality of the Mexican drug war, a conflict fueled by uncertainty and fear, is far more complex than the images conjured in popular imagination. Often missing from news reports is the perspective of ordinary people—migrant workers, schoolteachers, single mothers, businessmen, teenagers, petty criminals, police officers, and local journalists—people whose worlds center not on drugs or illegal activity but on survival and resilience, truth and reconciliation. Building on a rich tradition of testimonial literature, Valdez Cárdenas recounts in gripping detail how people deal not only with the constant threat of physical violence but also with the fear, uncertainty, and guilt that afflict survivors and witnesses. Mexican journalists who dare expose the drug war's inconvenient political and social realities are censored and smeared, murdered, and "disappeared." This is precisely why we need to hear from seasoned local reporters like Valdez Cárdenas who write about the places where they live, rely on a network of trusted sources built over decades, and tell the stories behind the headline-grabbing massacres and scandals. In his informative introduction to the volume, translator Everard Meade orients the reader to the broader armed conflict in Mexico and explains the unique role of Sinaloa as its epicenter. Reports on border politics and infamous drug traffickers may obscure the victims' suffering. The Taken helps ensure that their stories will not be forgotten or suppressed. Javier Valdez Cárdenas is an award-winning journalist and author who covers drug trafficking and organized crime in Mexico. His numerous articles have been published throughout Mexico and in such periodicals as National Geographic. His many published books include Miss Narco. Everard Meade is Director of the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego's Kroc School of Peace Studies and its certificate programs in Applied Peace Education in Culiacán, Sinaloa, Mexico. "Over the past decade, Javier Valdez Cardenas has shown himself to be one of Mexico's bravest and most awesomely steadfast reporters, eyeball to eyeball with a menace most of us in the United States cannot conceive of. We should welcome that his work is now finally available in English and consume it as though we're famished."—Sam Quinones, journalist and author of Dream Land: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic 
Price: 18.95 USD
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12 CHANCE, JOHN K. Conquest Of The Sierra: Spaniards And Indians In Colonial Oaxaca.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Conquest of the Sierra depicts the colonial experience in the Sierra Zapoteca, a remote mountain region of Oaxaca, in southern Mexico. This densely populated region is inhabited by Zapotec, Chinantec, and Mixe Indians, whose pre-Hispanic societies lacked the wealth, valuable craft economies, and intergration with trade networks found in the better-known societies of the neighboring Mixteca and the Valley of Oaxaca. Even during the colonial period the region remained remote. Its sole Spanish settlement, Villa Alta, never supported more than a handful of colonists, and haciendas and mining were of little importance. Yet through the Spanish system of forced production, the Indians of the Sierra became one of New Spain's leading producers of cochineal dyestuffs and cotton textiles. Based on unpublished and hitherto untapped archival sources, this book traces the evolution of a unique regional colonial society. The activities of Spanish political officials, merchants, and the clergy of Villa Alta are detailed, but the principal focus is one the Indian communities-their population, settlement patterns, economy, religious practices, and sociopolitical organization. Of special interest is the emergence of late colonial Zapotec elites and their role in the forced production and trade-the repartimientos de efectos-conducted by Spanish magistrates. The Sierra Zapoteca differed significantly from other regions of Oaxaca and central Mexico with respect to the process of conquest, economic integration, religious syncretism, and social stratification. Conquest of the Sierra shows how a relatively undeveloped pre-Conquest culture, coupled with a highly monopolistic colonial economy, produced a distinctive variant of indigenous society in colonial Mexico. 
Price: 18.95 USD
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13 CHANCE, JOHN K. Conquest Of The Sierra: Spaniards And Indians In Colonial Oaxaca.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Conquest of the Sierra depicts the colonial experience in the Sierra Zapoteca, a remote mountain region of Oaxaca, in southern Mexico. This densely populated region is inhabited by Zapotec, Chinantec, and Mixe Indians, whose pre-Hispanic societies lacked the wealth, valuable craft economies, and intergration with trade networks found in the better-known societies of the neighboring Mixteca and the Valley of Oaxaca. Even during the colonial period the region remained remote. Its sole Spanish settlement, Villa Alta, never supported more than a handful of colonists, and haciendas and mining were of little importance. Yet through the Spanish system of forced production, the Indians of the Sierra became one of New Spain's leading producers of cochineal dyestuffs and cotton textiles. Based on unpublished and hitherto untapped archival sources, this book traces the evolution of a unique regional colonial society. The activities of Spanish political officials, merchants, and the clergy of Villa Alta are detailed, but the principal focus is one the Indian communities-their population, settlement patterns, economy, religious practices, and sociopolitical organization. Of special interest is the emergence of late colonial Zapotec elites and their role in the forced production and trade-the repartimientos de efectos-conducted by Spanish magistrates. The Sierra Zapoteca differed significantly from other regions of Oaxaca and central Mexico with respect to the process of conquest, economic integration, religious syncretism, and social stratification. Conquest of the Sierra shows how a relatively undeveloped pre-Conquest culture, coupled with a highly monopolistic colonial economy, produced a distinctive variant of indigenous society in colonial Mexico. 
Price: 18.95 USD
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14 CHRISTENSON, ALLEN J. Popol Vuh: The Sacred Book Of The Maya.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The Popol Vuh is the most important example of Maya literature to have survived the Spanish conquest. It is also one of the world's great creation accounts, comparable to the beauty and power of Genesis. Most previous translations have relied on Spanish versions rather than the original K'iche'-Maya text. Based on ten years of research by a leading scholar of Maya literature, this translation with extensive notes is uniquely faithful to the original language. Retaining the poetic style of the original text, the translation is also remarkably accessible to English readers. Illustrated with more than eighty drawings, photographs, and maps, Allen J. Christenson's authoritative version brings out the richness and elegance of this sublime work of literature, comparable to such epic masterpieces as the Ramayana and Mahabharata of India or the Iliad and Odyssey of Greece. 
Price: 23.94 USD
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15 CONNELL, WILLIAM F. After Moctezuma: Indigenous Politics And Self-government In Mexico City, 1524-1730.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2011. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
The first study of indigenous political dynamics in Tenochtitlan after the Spanish invasion. The Spanish invasion of Mexico in 1519 left the capital city, Tenochtitlan, in ruins. Conquistador Hernán Cortés, following the city's surrender in 1521, established a governing body to organize its reconstruction. Cortés was careful to appoint native people to govern who had held positions of authority before his arrival, establishing a pattern that endured for centuries. William F. Connell's After Moctezuma: Indigenous Politics and Self-Government in Mexico City, 1524-1730 reveals how native self-government in former Tenochtitlan evolved over time as the city and its population changed. Drawing on extensive research in Mexico's Archivo General de la Nación, Connell shows how the hereditary political system of the Mexica was converted into a government by elected town councilmen, patterned after the Spanish cabildo, or municipal council. In the process, the Spanish relied upon existing Mexica administrative entities—the native ethnic state, or altepetl of Mexico Tenochtitlan, became the parcialidad of San Juan Tenochtitlan, for instance—preserving indigenous ideas of government within an imposed Spanish structure. Over time, the electoral system undermined the preconquest elite and introduced new native political players, facilitating social change. By the early eighteenth century, a process that had begun in the 1500s with the demise of Moctezuma and the royal line of Tenochtitlan had resulted in a politically independent indigenous cabildo. After Moctezuma is the first systematic study of the indigenous political structures at the heart of New Spain. With careful attention to relations among colonial officials and indigenous power brokers, Connell shows that the ongoing contest for control of indigenous government in Mexico City made possible a new kind of political system neither wholly indigenous nor entirely Spanish. Ultimately, he offers insight into the political voice Tenochtitlan's indigenous people gained with the ability to choose their own leaders—exercising power that endured through the end of the colonial period and beyond. William F. Connell, an Associate Professor of History at Christopher Newport University, specializes in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Mexico and Latin America. His articles have appeared in the Colonial Latin American Historical Review and the Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History. 
Price: 42.75 USD
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16 CORR, RACHEL. Ritual And Remembrance In The Ecuadorian Andes.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson 2010. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Not every world culture that has battled colonization has suffered or died. In the Ecuadorian Andean parish of Salasaca, the indigenous culture has stayed true to itself and its surroundings for centuries while adapting to each new situation. Today, indigenous Salascans continue to devote a large part of their lives to their distinctive practices—both community rituals and individual behaviors—while living side by side with white-mestizo culture. In this book Rachel Corr provides a knowledgeable account of the Salasacan religion and rituals and their respective histories. Based on eighteen years of fieldwork in Salasaca, as well as extensive research in Church archives—including never-before-published documents—Corr's book illuminates how Salasacan culture adapted to Catholic traditions and recentered, reinterpreted, and even reshaped them to serve similarly motivated Salasacan practices, demonstrating the link between formal and folk Catholicism and pre-Columbian beliefs and practices. Corr also explores the intense connection between the local Salasacan rituals and the mountain landscapes around them, from peak to valley. Ritual and Remembrance in the Ecuadorian Andes is, in its portrayal of Salasacan religious culture, both thorough and all-encompassing. Sections of the book cover everything from the performance of death rituals to stories about Amazonia as Salasacans interacted with outsiders—conquistadors and camera-toting tourists alike. Corr also investigates the role of shamanism in modern Salasacan culture, including shamanic powers and mountain spirits, and the use of reshaped, Andeanized Catholicism to sustain collective memory. Through its unique insider's perspective of Salasacan spirituality, Ritual and Remembrance in the Ecuadorian Andes is a valuable anthropological work that honestly represents this people's great ability to adapt. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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17 CROW, JOHN A. The Epic Of Latin America.
University of California Press, Berkeley and Los Angeles: 1992. 0520077237 / 9780520077232 Fourth Edition. s Softcover. Good condition. 

Price: 32.78 USD
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18 CUMMINS, THOMAS B. F.; ENGEL, EMILY; ANDERSON, BARBARA & OSSIO, JUAN (EDITORS). Manuscript Cultures Of Colonial Mexico And Peru: New Questions And Approaches.
Getty Publications, Los Angeles: 2015. The Getty Research Institute Series: Issues & Debates. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
This volume showcases dynamic developments in the field of manuscript research that go beyond traditional textual, iconographic, or codicological studies. Using state-of-the-art conservation technologies, scholars investigate how four manuscripts—the Galvin Murúa, the Getty Murúa, the Florentine Codex, and the Relación de Michoacán—were created and demonstrate why these objects must be studied in a comparative context. The forensic study of manuscripts provides art historians, anthropologists, curators, and conservators with effective methods for determining authorship, identifying technical innovations, and contextualizing illustrated histories. This information, in turn, allows for more nuanced arguments that transcend the information that the written texts and painted images themselves provide. The book encourages scholars to think broadly about the manuscripts of colonial Mexico and Peru in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and employ new techniques and methods of research. Thomas B. F. Cummins is the Dumbarton Oaks Professor of the History of Pre-Columbian and Colonial Art and chair of the Department of the History of Art and Architecture at Harvard University. Emily Engel is chair and assistant professor in the Department of Fine Arts at the College of Mount Saint Vincent, New York. Barbara Anderson is an independent curator and art historian. Juan Ossio is senior professor in the Departamento de Ciencias Sociales at the Pontifica Universidad Católica del Perú, and from 2008 to 2011 served as the inaugural Peruvian Minister of Culture. 224 pages, 7 x 10 inches,35 color and 27 black-and-white illustrations, 6 line drawings. 
Price: 46.55 USD
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19 DAVIDSON, RUSS (EDITOR); JUCERO, HELEN R. (FOREWORD); CRAVEN, DAVID ET AL (ESSAYS). Latin American Posters: Public Aesthetics And Mass Politics.
Museum of New Mexico Press, Santa Fe: 2006. s Paperbound with flaps. Brand new book. 
The political and cultural posters presented here document four decades of Latin American social and political history during a time of widespread crisis and unrest. The simplicity and directness of the political poster made it a powerful instrument for announcing the mood of the moment, transmitting messages, and mobilizing mass action. 9x12, 142 color plates. 
Price: 33.20 USD
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20 DAVIDSON, RUSS (EDITOR); JUCERO, HELEN R. (FOREWORD); CRAVEN, DAVID ET AL (ESSAYS). Latin American Posters: Public Aesthetics And Mass Politics.
Museum of New Mexico Press, Santa Fe: 2006. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
The political and cultural posters presented here document four decades of Latin American social and political history during a time of widespread crisis and unrest. The simplicity and directness of the political poster made it a powerful instrument for announcing the mood of the moment, transmitting messages, and mobilizing mass action. 9x12, 142 color plates. 
Price: 47.50 USD
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