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AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES.

AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES.

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1 ALEXANDER, AMY. The Farrakhan Factor: African-american Writers On Leadership, Nationhood, And Minister Louis Farrakhan.
Grove Press, New York: 1997. 0802135978 / 9780802135971 s Softcover. Good condition. 
"Honest, unsparing and thorough in [its] discussion not only of Farrakhan, but also of the Nation of Islam, black nationalism and the state of race relations." - The Boston Globe 
Price: 14.49 USD
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2 ASANTE, MOLEFI KETE. Afrocentricity.
Africa World Press, Trenton: 1996 0865430675 / 9780865430679 Eighth Printing. s Softcover. Good condition. 

Price: 23.04 USD
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3 BAILEY, CORNELIA WITH CHRISTENA, BLEDSOE. God, Dr. Buzzard, And The Bolito Man: A Saltwater Geechee Talks About Life On Sapelo Island.
Doubleday and Company, Inc., New York: 2000. 0385493762 / 9780385493765 First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 
In this beautiful cultural memoir, Sapelo Island native Cornelia Walker Bailey tells the fascinating history of her remarkable and threatened Georgia homeland. Off the coast of Georgia, a small close-knit community of African-Americans traces their lineage to enslaved West Africans. Living on a barrier island in almost total isolation, the people of Sapelo have been able to do what most others could not: They have preserved many of the folkways of their forebears in West Africa, believing in "signs and spirits and all kinds of magic." Cornelia Walker Bailey, a direct descendant of Bilali, the most famous and powerful enslaved African to inhabit the islan, is the keeper of cultural secrets and the sage of Sapelo. In words that are pooetic and straight to the point, she tells the story of her Sapelo - including the Geechee belief in the equal power of God, "Dr. Buzzard" (voodoo), and the "Bolito Man" (luck). 
Price: 21.04 USD
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4 BROADNAX,SAMUEL L.; OSUR, ALAN M. (FOREWORD). Blue Skies, Black Wings: African American Pioneers Of Aviation.
University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln: 2008. First Nebraska Paperback Printing. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
At the age of seventeen, Samuel L. Broadnax, enamored with flying, enlisted and trained as a pilot at the Tuskegee Army Air Base. Although he left the Air Corps at the end of the Second World War, his experiences inspired him to talk with other pilots and black pioneers of aviation. Blue Skies, Black Wings recounts the history of African Americans in the skies from the very beginnings of manned flight. From Charles Wesley Peters, who flew his own plane in 1911, and Eugene Bullard, a black American pilot with the French in World War I, to the 1945 Freeman Field mutiny against segregationist policies in the Air Corps, Broadnax paints a vivid picture of the people who fought oppression to make the skies their own. Samuel L. Broadnax graduated from Tuskegee Army Air Base with Class-45A in March 1945 as a fighter pilot. One of the celebrated Tuskegee Airmen, he was assigned to the 332nd Replacement Training Unit. He later attended Yuba College, Howard University, and the University of California, Berkeley, and has worked as a newscaster and journalist. In 2006 the Tuskegee Airmen were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor. "Broadnax provides a long-needed book. . . . He tells what it was like to be an African American man of courage and skill in the racist south and U.S. Army of that time. . . . Broadnax paints a clear picture of how those young men earned their commissions as second lieutenants in the U.S. Army Air Force of more than six decades ago. Their story is well worth reading now. . . . Highly recommended."—Choice "[Broadnax's] own love of flying is evident in his recollections of the rarefied status of flying in the early days, and his own personal struggle to garner the experience for himself despite the racial limitations of the time."—Booklist 
Price: 16.10 USD
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5 DUMAS, JIMMY. 24 Reasons Why African Americans Suffer.
African American Images, Chicago: 1999. 0913543632 / 9780913543634 s Softcover. Good condition. 

Price: 13.78 USD
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6 FOSTER, FRANCIS SMITH. Love And Marriage In Early African America.
Northeastern University Press / University Press of New England, Hanover: 2007. Northeastern Library of Black Literature Series. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
An eye-opening anthology of nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century African American primary writings on love, courtship, and family. Love and Marriage in Early African America brings together a remarkable range of folk sayings, rhymes, songs, poems, letters, lectures, sermons, short stories, memoirs, and autobiographies. Spanning over 100 years, from the slave era to the New Negro Movement, this extraordinary collection contradicts or nuances established notions that slavery fractured families, devalued sexual morality, distorted gender roles, and set in motion forces that now produce dismal and dangerous domestic situations. A culmination of twenty years of diligent research by noted scholar Frances Smith Foster, this anthology features selections on love and courtship, marriage, marriage rituals, and family. A compelling introduction places the primary texts in their social and literary context. A bibliography offers suggestions for further reading. This volume includes materials by well known writers such as Frances E. W. Harper, Charles Chesnutt, and Alice Dunbar Nelson, but the majority of works are previously unknown or difficult-to-access materials. Many provide startling contrasts to representations in canonical literature. For example, "Patrick Brown's First Love" is a radical alternative to Frederick Douglass's "The Heroic Slave," and Thomas Detter's "The Octoroon" replaces the traditionally tragic mulatto trope with a female protagonist who shocks and awes. Love and Marriage in Early African America also changes our ideas about the relationship between religion and politics in early African America by featuring texts from the Afro-Protestant press; that is, the publishing organizations, writers, and reading groups under the direct auspices of, or publicly associated with, Afro-Protestant churches. Frances Smith Foster is Charles Howard Candler Professor of English and Women's Studies and Chair of the English Department at Emory University. Her previous publications include Witnessing Slavery: The Development of the Ante-Bellum Slave Narrative, and Written By Herself: Literary Production by African American Women Writers, 1746-1892. Professor Foster has edited or co-edited numerous volumes, including, most notably, The Norton Anthology of African American Literature and The Oxford Companion to African American Literature. 
Price: 61.75 USD
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7 FOSTER, FRANCIS SMITH. Love And Marriage In Early African America.
Northeastern University Press / University Press of New England, Hanover: 2007. Northeastern Library of Black Literature Series. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
An eye-opening anthology of nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century African American primary writings on love, courtship, and family. Love and Marriage in Early African America brings together a remarkable range of folk sayings, rhymes, songs, poems, letters, lectures, sermons, short stories, memoirs, and autobiographies. Spanning over 100 years, from the slave era to the New Negro Movement, this extraordinary collection contradicts or nuances established notions that slavery fractured families, devalued sexual morality, distorted gender roles, and set in motion forces that now produce dismal and dangerous domestic situations. A culmination of twenty years of diligent research by noted scholar Frances Smith Foster, this anthology features selections on love and courtship, marriage, marriage rituals, and family. A compelling introduction places the primary texts in their social and literary context. A bibliography offers suggestions for further reading. This volume includes materials by well known writers such as Frances E. W. Harper, Charles Chesnutt, and Alice Dunbar Nelson, but the majority of works are previously unknown or difficult-to-access materials. Many provide startling contrasts to representations in canonical literature. For example, "Patrick Brown's First Love" is a radical alternative to Frederick Douglass's "The Heroic Slave," and Thomas Detter's "The Octoroon" replaces the traditionally tragic mulatto trope with a female protagonist who shocks and awes. Love and Marriage in Early African America also changes our ideas about the relationship between religion and politics in early African America by featuring texts from the Afro-Protestant press; that is, the publishing organizations, writers, and reading groups under the direct auspices of, or publicly associated with, Afro-Protestant churches. Frances Smith Foster is Charles Howard Candler Professor of English and Women's Studies and Chair of the English Department at Emory University. Her previous publications include Witnessing Slavery: The Development of the Ante-Bellum Slave Narrative, and Written By Herself: Literary Production by African American Women Writers, 1746-1892. Professor Foster has edited or co-edited numerous volumes, including, most notably, The Norton Anthology of African American Literature and The Oxford Companion to African American Literature. 
Price: 21.80 USD
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8 FOX-GENOVESE, ELIZABETH & GENOVESE, EUGENE D. The Mind Of The Master Class: History And Faith In The Southern Slaveholders' Worldview.
Cambridge University Press, Cambridge: 2005. 0521615623 / 9780521615624 First Edition (Unstated). s Softcover. Brand new book. 
lows: Part I. Cradled in the Storms of Revolution: 1. 'That Terrible Tragedy'; 2. The age of revolution through slaveholding eyes; 3. 'The Purest Sons of Freedom'; Entr'Acte: the bonds of slavery; Part II. The Inescapable Past: 4. History as moral and political instruction; 5. The slaveholders' quest for a history of the common people; 6. World history and the politics of slavery; 7. History as the story of freedom; Part III. Ancient Legacies, Medieval Sensibility, Modern Men: 8. In the shadow of antiquity; 9. Coming to terms with the Middle Ages; 10. The chivalry; 11. Chivalric slave masters; 12. Chivalric politics: Southern ladies take their stand; Part IV. A Christian People Defend the Faith: 13. A Christian people; 14. Unity and diversity among the faithful; 15. War over the Good Book; 16. Slavery: proceeding from the Lord; 17. The Holy Spirit in the word of God; 18. Jerusalem and Athens - against Paris; 19. Serpent in the garden: liberal theology in the South; 20. Theopolitics: golden rule, higher law, and slavery; Coda: St. John of Pottawatamie; Part V. At the Rubicon: 21. Between individualism and corporatism: from the reformation to the war for Southern Independence; 22. Past and future Caesars; Epilogue: King Solomon's dilemma. Includes an Index. "Elizabeth Fox-Genovese and Eugene D. Genovese have given us a masterpiece of the historian's art. Every serious student of the American South and of American intellectual life must read it - now and for many years to come" - Times Literary Supplement 'The Genoveses give us a learned, lucid, even luminous portrait of a worldview bought to ruin by the freeing of those on whose forced labour it rested.' Times Literary Supplement 
Price: 29.17 USD
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9 HILL, LENA M. & MICHAEL D. HILL (EDITORS). African Americans At The University Of Iowa During The Long Civil Rights Era.
University of Iowa Press, Iowa City: 2016. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Between the 1930s and 1960s, the University of Iowa sought to assert its modernity, cosmopolitanism, and progressivism through an increased emphasis on the fine and performing arts and athletics. This enhancement coincided with a period when an increasing number of African American students arrived at the university, from both within and outside the state, seeking to take advantage of its relatively liberal racial relations and rising artistic prestige. The presence of accomplished African American students performing in musical concerts, participating in visual art exhibitions, acting on stage, publishing literature, and competing on sports fields forced white students, instructors, and administrators to confront their undeniable intellect and talent. Unlike the work completed in traditional academic units, these students' contributions to the university community were highly visible and burst beyond the walls of their individual units and primary spheres of experience to reach a much larger audience on campus and in the city and nation beyond the university's boundaries. By examining the quieter collisions between Iowa's polite midwestern progressivism and African American students' determined ambition, Invisible Hawkeyes focuses attention on both local stories and their national implications. By looking at the University of Iowa and a smaller midwestern college town like Iowa City, this collection reveals how fraught moments of interracial collaboration, meritocratic advancement, and institutional insensitivity deepen our understanding of America's painful conversion into a diverse republic committed to racial equality. People discussed in this collection include Edison Holmes Anderson, George Overall Caldwell, Elizabeth Catlett, Fanny Ellison, Oscar Anderson Fuller, Michael Harper, James Alan McPherson, Herbert Franklin Mells, Herbert Nipson, Thomas Pawley, William Oscar Smith, Mitchell Southall, and Margaret Walker. 2016 Shambaugh Certificate of Merit Recipient. Lena M. Hill is an associate professor of English and African American studies at the University of Iowa. She is the author of Visualizing Blackness and the Creation of African American Literary Tradition and is the coauthor of Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man: A Reference Guide. Michael D. Hill is an associate professor of English and African American studies at the University of Iowa. He is the author of The Ethics of Swagger: Prizewinning African American Novels, 1977-1993 and is the coauthor of Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man: A Reference Guide. He lives in Iowa City, Iowa. "Lucidly written and intelligently conceived, Invisible Hawkeyes is a timely and important volume that introduces readers to the position held by the University of Iowa, a large, northern land grant university, in the drama of American racial transformation during the middle of the twentieth century. This vital and important work, recovering the lives of early black students at the university, makes even larger claims about the prominence of the Midwest in national conversations about race and African American art and artistic styles."—Lawrence Jackson, author, The Indignant Generation: A Narrative History of African American Writers and Critics, 1934-1960 "A provocative balance of both local and national cultural history, Invisible Hawkeyes tells the stories of the University of Iowa's integration in the period of 1930-1960. The blend of first-person testimonial and more formal, scholarly chapters produces a highly engaging, stirring, and informative book that reveals both the glories and the failures of the integration movement in American universities at midcentury."—Marc Conner, author, The New Territory: Ralph Ellison and the Twenty-First Century 
Price: 19.00 USD
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10 HILLIS, NEWELL DWIGHT. The Battles Of Principles: A Study Of The Heroism And The Eloquence Of The Anti-slavery Conflict.
Negro Universities Press, New York: 1969. 0837117356 / 9780837117355 Reprint Edition. h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Very good reading copy. Library discard. Bottom edges of front cover are worn. 

Price: 27.79 USD
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11 JONES, JR., NORRECE T. Born A Child Of Freedom, Yet A Slave: Mechanisms Of Control And Strategies Of Resistance In Antebellum South Carolina.
Wesleyan University Press: 1990. 0819562467 / 9780819562463 s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The diverse strategies employed by Southern slaveholders to keep their slaves under control—and those employed by the slaves to resist. Born a Child of Freedom, Yet a Slave explores the diverse strategies employed by Southern slaveholders to keep their slaves under control—from threats of sale, shackles, screw box, or treadmill, to a peck of corn a week, a dram of whiskey, a pound of tobacco, the bribe of freedom, and the promise of heaven. It explores also the counterdefensive strategies employed by the slaves to resist control — among them, arson, theft, poison, subterfuge, murder, escape, and rebellion. Norrece Jones, himself a descendent of South Carolina slaves, has written a powerful book based on intensive research in the archives of antebellum South Carolina. He has studied slave testimony, legal records, folklore, spirituals, autobiographies of whites and blacks, newspaper accounts, church records, and many other sources. He challenges views of slavery as an interdependent paternalistic system; he sees it instead as a harsh and unceasing conflict, with most slaves refusing to accept their masters' dictates and most slave owners struggling to keep slaves servile and devoted. Means of control were both subtle and brutal. For example, there were festive holidays and gifts of liquor but also sadistic punishment: recalcitrant slaves—men and women alike— were staked to the ground or trussed from rafters with "nigger cord" to be whipped; some were branded; others were hanged or torched. Many of the same masters who provided a sick room for slaves also maintained a private jail. But of all the means of control, the most sinister and the most effective was the threat of sale and separation from family. Troublemakers were routinely sold. The weak, the sick, the malingering, the disobedient, the impudent, the "incorrigible" were disposed of on the block. Slaves often aided and abetted runaways, although some, in hope of favor, were informants—every antebellum conspiracy in South Carolina was betrayed. Yet self-respect and pride survived nonetheless. "You no holy," slaves told one mistress, "We holy." "With admirable cogency, Norrece Jones lays bare the harsh conflict between slaveholders' multiple mechanisms for trying to keep their slaves servile and the slaves' determined efforts to resist the domination of those who claimed to own them…Resonates with passion and power."—Charles Joyner, University of South Carolina "This fierce volume, especially in its emphasis on selling slaves from each other as a means of controlling them, reopens the debate of the nature and extent of planter paternalism."—William W. Freehling, John Hopkins University Norrece T. Jones, Jr., born in Philadelphia and raised in the urban North, spent his summers with four generations of family in the rural South, where he first saw the large plantations of antebellum South Carolina, symbols of the society of slavery. After a year at the University of Ghana as an exchange student in 1972-73, he was graduated from Hampton in 1974. He received his Ph.D from Northwestern University in 1981. Jones is an associate professor of history at Virginia Commonwealth University. 
Price: 26.55 USD
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12 KUNJUFU, JAWANZA. Developing Positive Self-images And Discipline In Black Children.
African American Images, Chicago: 1984. 0913543012 / 9780913543016 First Edition, Twenty-first Printing. s Softcover. Good condition. 

Price: 9.26 USD
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13 MAGILL, FRANK N (EDITOR). Masterpieces Of African-american Literature.
HarperCollins Publishers, New York: 1992. 0062700669 / 9780062700667 First Edition. h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Good condition. 
Designed to highlight the literary achievements of African-American authors from the eighteenth century to the present, the essays in this book were developed in response to the growing need for reference works capable of presenting informationin an easy-to-use format. 
Price: 9.03 USD
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14 NAISON, MARK. Communists In Harlem During The Depression.
University of Illinois Press, Urbana: 1983. 0252006445 / 9780252006449 h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 
Naison's superb study will fill a number of important gaps in the libraries of students and scholars of black history, the Communist Party in America, the Depression years, and the history of New York City. Includes an Index. 
Price: 65.08 USD
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15 POUGH, GWENDOLYN D. Check It While I Wreck It: Black Womanhood, Hip-hop Culture, And The Public Sphere.
Northeastern University Press / University Press of New England, Hanover: . 1555536077 / 9781555536077 s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Examines how young black women who came of age during the hip-hop era are grappling with the gender politics of a predominately masculine space. Hip-hop culture began in the early 1970s as the creative and activist expressions - graffiti writing, dee-jaying, break dancing, and rap music - of black and Latino youth in the depressed South Bronx, and the movement has since grown into a worldwide cultural phenomenon that permeates almost every aspect of society, from speech to dress. But although hip-hop has been assimilated and exploited in the mainstream, young black women who came of age during the hip-hop era are still fighting for equality. In this provocative study, Gwendolyn D. Pough explores the complex relationship between black women, hip-hop, and feminism. Examining a wide range of genres, including rap music, novels, spoken word poetry, hip-hop cinema, and hip-hop soul music, she traces the rhetoric of black women "bringing wreck." Pough demonstrates how influential women rappers such as Queen Latifah, Missy Elliot, and Lil' Kim are building on the legacy of earlier generations of women -- from Sojourner Truth to sisters of the black power and civil rights movements - to disrupt and break into the dominant patriarchal public sphere. She discusses the ways in which today's young black women struggle against the stereotypical language of the past ("castrating black mother," "mammy," "sapphire") and the present ("bitch," "ho," "chickenhead"), and shows how rap provides an avenue to tell their own life stories, to construct their identities, and to dismantle historical and contemporary negative representations of black womanhood. Pough also looks at the ongoing public dialogue between male and female rappers about love and relationships, explaining how the denigrating rhetoric used by men has been appropriated by black women rappers as a means to empowerment in their own lyrics. The author concludes with a discussion of the pedagogical implications of rap music as well as of third wave and black feminism. This fresh and thought-provoking perspective on the complexities of hip-hop urges young black women to harness the energy, vitality, and activist roots of hip-hop culture and rap music to claim a public voice for themselves and to "bring wreck" on sexism and misogyny in mainstream society. 
Price: 21.80 USD
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16 ROGERS, J. A. Africa's Gift To America: The Afro-american In The Making And Saving Of The United States : With New Supplement, Africa And Its Potentialities.
Helga M. Rogers, St. Petersburg, FL, 1989. 0960229469 / 9780960229468 h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 
Details the role of the African American from its founding in America in the 17th century through the Revolutionary War period to the United States Civil War and early Post-Civil War era. 
Price: 114.95 USD
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17 SCHOENER, ALLEN (EDITOR). Harlem On My Mind: Cultural Capital Of Black America, 1900-1968.
Random House, New York: 1968. s Softcover. Good condition. 

Price: 37.76 USD
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18 TURNER, DARWIN T.; BRIGHT, JEAN M (EDITORS). Images Of The Negro In America: Selected Source Materials For College Research Papers.
D. C. Heath and Company, Boston: 1965. s Softcover. Reading copy. Heavy highlighting and underlining 
A collection of works by prominent black authors in America - Paul Laurence Dunbar, Frederick Douglass, W. E. B. Du Bois, Alain Locke, Carter G. Woodson, Benjamin G. Brawley, J. Saunders Redding, James Baldwin, E. Franklin Frazier, Langston Hughes, Arna Bontemps, Blyden Jackson, Darwin T. Turner, Louis E. Lomax, Martin Luther King, Jr. - for students undertaking research papers. 
Price: 15.91 USD
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19 WATERS, KRISTIN & CONAWAY, CAROL B. (EDITORS). Black Women's Intellectual Traditions: Speaking Their Minds.
University of Vermont / University Press of New England, Hanover: 2007. h Hardcover, no dustjacket (as issued). Brand new book. 
In one wonderfully rich and comprehensive volume, Waters and Conaway present the foundation of the groundbreaking, but little known, history of black women's early intellectual pursuits.—A'Lelia Bundles, author, producer, and Chair of the Letitia Woods Brown Memorial Book Prize Provocative revelations about the flourishing black women's intellectual traditions in nineteenth-century America. An astonishing wealth of literary and intellectual work by nineteenth-century black women is being rediscovered and restored to print in scholarly and popular editions. In Kristin Waters's and Carol B. Conaway's landmark edited collection, Black Women's Intellectual Traditions: Speaking Their Minds, sophisticated commentary on this rich body of work chronicles a powerful and interwoven legacy of activism based in social and political theories that helped shape the history of North America. The book meticulously reclaims this American legacy, providing a collection of critical analyses of the primary sources and their vital traditions. Written by leading scholars, Black Women's Intellectual Traditions is particularly powerful in its exploration of the pioneering thought and action of the nineteenth-century black woman lecturer and essayist Maria W. Stewart, abolitionist Sojourner Truth, novelist and poet Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, educator Anna Julia Cooper, newspaper editor Mary Ann Shadd Cary, and activist Ida B. Wells. The distinguished contributors are Hazel V. Carby, Patricia Hill Collins, Karen Baker-Fletcher, Kristin Waters, R. Dianne Bartlow, Carol B. Conaway, Olga Idriss Davis, Vanessa Holford Diana, Evelyn Simien, Janice W. Fernheimer, Michelle N. Garfield, Joy James, Valerie Palmer-Mehta, Carla L. Peterson, Marilyn Richardson, Evelyn M. Simien, Ebony A. Utley, Mary Helen Washington, Melina Abdullah, and Lena Ampadu. The volume will interest scholars and readers of African-American and women's studies, history, rhetoric, literature, poetry, sociology, political science, and philosophy. "This work is a rigorous examination of the lives of nineteenth century women as agents of changes and vehicles of feminized rhetoric. The authors have included the scholarship of notable historians and grouped each series of essays within unique spaces of personalities and forms of activism. In-depth analysis of women and their work, utilizing new paradigms to explain and explore the lives and hallmarks within the historiography of Black women's history."—Ida E. Jones, Howard University "Black Women's Intellectual Traditions challenges us not just to insert black women into feminist histories, but to expand and rework our definitions and histories of feminism and of African American intellectual traditions . . . Black Women's Intellectual Traditions is about the future as well as the past, and about what can be, as well as what has been, done. Its message should resonate with those in the academy and beyond, those explicitly identified as feminists and those who might deny (or be denied) that designation, and women and men of all races who seek to study, teach, and promote the black feminist vision of resistance to injustice."—Journal of American History 
Price: 61.75 USD
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20 WHITFIELD, HARVEY AMANI. Blacks On The Border: The Black Refugees In British North America, 1815-1860.
University of Vermont / University Press of New England, Hanover: 2006. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
A study of the emergence of community among African Americans in Nova Scotia. Following the American Revolution, free black communities and enslaved African Americans increasingly struggled to reconcile their African heritage with their American home. This struggle resulted in tens of thousands of African Americans seeking new homes in areas as diverse as Haiti and Nova Scotia. Black refugees arrived in Nova Scotia after the War of 1812 with little in common but their desire for freedom. By 1860, they had formed families, communities, and traditions. Harvey Amani Whitfield's study reconstructs the lives and history of a sizeable but neglected group of African Americans by placing their history within the framework of free black communities in New England and Nova Scotia during the nineteenth century. It examines which aspects of American and African American culture black expatriates used or discarded in an area that forced them to negotiate the overlapping worlds of Great Britain, the United States, Afro-New England, and the African American Diaspora, while considering how former American slaves understood freedom long before the Civil War. "This study of black refugees to British Canada fills in another part of the puzzle that is African American history. Slowly the simplistic view of blacks fleeing to Canada on the legendary 'underground railroad' is evolving into a more authentic study of the spread of African culture throughout the northern hemisphere. Studying the scattered migration of 'Diaspora' of blacks away from slavery toward freedom is giving us a clearer picture of the scope of American history from early colonization, through the Civil War and Civil Rights to the modern day."—seacoastNH. "Canadians, especially Nova Scotians, are indebted to Amani Whitfield, an American scholar, who first came to Nova Scotia in 1997 to study for his masters in history. After six years of research and writing and a recent Ph.D., he has written a powerful book, a tour de force. With insightful analysis, he describes how former American slaves from diverse backgrounds became Black Refugees in Canada and eventually formed a distinct culture of Black people before the American Civil War."—New England Quarterly "...[A]n inspiration for other historians who want to understand race and identity in the Atlantic world."—Journal of the Early Republic "Originally researched, fully contextualized, persuasively argued, and leanly and lucidly written, this ostensibly regional study is in fact a work of transborder and continental, if not hemispheric, history. Some 35 years ago another American historian, the late Robin Winks, put African-Canadian history on the scholarly map. It now falls to Harvey Amani Whitfield to take up the torch and write a braver and newer history which takes seriously the African-Canadian experience and fully integrates it into the wider history—not only of the Diaspora and the Black Atlantic, but also of Blacks in the British Empire." —Barry Cahill, Independent Scholar, Halifax, Nova Scotia "By focusing his lens on Nova Scotia, Harvey Amani Whitfield illuminates the experience of one of the largest and yet most neglected free black communities in all of antebellum North America. This lucid monograph weaves together several important strands of historiography as it seeks to understand the complex identity African-American refugees constructed for themselves on the fringes of the Atlantic world. Perhaps not since Robin Winks has a scholar done as much to illuminate the black experience in Canada."—Patrick Rael, author of Black Identity and Black Protest in the Antebellum North (2002) Harvey Amani Whitfield is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Vermont. "Whitfield is unlikely to be surpassed in his analysis of the reasons for emigration to Nova Scotia....an excellent book."—American Review of Canadian Studies Review 
Price: 23.70 USD
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