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BOLIVIA.

BOLIVIA.

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1 BABEL, ANNA M. Between The Andes And The Amazon: Language And Social Meaning In Bolivia.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2018. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Why can't a Quechua speaker wear pants? Anna M. Babel uses this question to open an analysis of language and social structure at the border of eastern and western, highland and lowland Bolivia. Through an exploration of categories such as political affiliation, ethnic identity, style of dress, and history of migration, she describes the ways that people understand themselves and others as Quechua speakers, Spanish speakers, or something in between. Between the Andes and the Amazon is ethnography in storytelling form, a rigorous yet sensitive exploration of how people understand themselves and others as members of social groups through the words and languages they use. Drawing on fifteen years of ethnographic research, Babel offers a close examination of how people produce oppositions, even as they might position themselves "in between" those categories. These oppositions form the raw material of the social system that people accept as "normal" or "the way things are." Meaning-making happens through language use and language play, Babel explains, and the practice of using Spanish versus Quechua is a claim to an identity or a social position. Babel gives personal perspectives on what it is like to live in this community, focusing on her own experiences and those of her key consultants. Between the Andes and the Amazon opens new ways of thinking about what it means to be a speaker of an indigenous or colonial language—or a mix of both. Anna M. Babel is an associate professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the Ohio State University. A former Peace Corps volunteer, her research has focused on the Quechua-Spanish contact zone in central Bolivia. "This superb study reveals the linguistic, sociopolitical, and cultural complexity confronted by Quechua and Spanish speakers and by Quechua-Spanish bilinguals in central Bolivia."—Choice "Babel's engaging and insightful analysis highlights the complexity inherent in linguistic and cultural contact. This beautifully written ethnography will be a crucial resource for linguistic anthropologists and scholars of Latin America."—Rusty Barrett, author of From Drag Queens to Leathermen: Language, Gender, and Gay Male Subcultures "An innovative book, grounded in ethnography, while never losing sight of the linguistic details that pervade and inform our social world. One hopes that more books will be written in this spirit."—Anthony K. Webster, author of Intimate Grammars: An Ethnography of Navajo Poetry 
Price: 57.00 USD
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2 CALDERÓN, ALESSANDRA PELLEGRINI. Beyond Indigeneity: Coca Growing And The Emergence Of A New Middle Class In Bolivia.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2016. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
In Bolivia, the discourse on indigenous peoples intensified in the last few decades, culminating in the election of Evo Morales as president in 2005. Indigenous people are portrayed by the Morales government as modest, communitarian, humble, poor, anticapitalist, and economically marginalized. In his 2006 inaugural speech, Morales famously described indigenous people as "the moral reserve of humanity." His rhetoric has reached all levels of society—most notably the new political constitution of 2009. This constitution initiated a new regime of considerable ethnic character by defining thirty-six indigenous nations and languages. Beyond Indigeneity offers new analysis into indigenous identity and social mobility that changes the discourse in Latin American social anthropology. Author Alessandra Pellegrini Calderon points out that Morales's presidency has led to heightened publicity of coca issues and an intensification of indigeneity discourse, echoing a global trend of increased recognition of indigenous peoples' claims. The "living well" attitude (vivir bien) enshrined in the new political constitution is generally represented as an indigenous way of life, one based on harmony and reciprocity, in sharp contrast to the capitalist logic of "living better" that is based on accumulation and expansion. In this ethnography, Pellegrini explores the positioning of coca growers in Bolivia and their reluctance to embrace the politics of indigeneity by rejecting the "indigenous peoples' slot," even while they emerge as a new middle class. By staying in a space between ethnic categories and also between social classes, the coca growers break with the traditional model of social mobility in Latin America and create new forms of political positioning that challenge the dominant culturalist framework about indigeneity and peasants. "The author knits a complete picture of the class, race, and regional identities at play and weaves a complex tapestry of community structures."—Middle Atlantic Review of Latin American Studies "Alessandra Pellegrini Calderon has lived, worked, and accompanied coca growers over several years, and paints a rich picture of the workings of this economic sector."—Nancy Postero, author of Now We Are Citizens: Indigenous Politics in Postmulticultural Bolivia 
Price: 52.25 USD
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3 CANESSA, ANDREW. Natives Making Nation: Gender, Indigeneity, And The State In The Andes.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2005. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
In Bolivia today, the ability to speak an indigenous language is highly valued among educated urbanites as a useful job skill, but a rural person who speaks a native language is branded with lower social status. Likewise, chewing coca in the countryside spells "inferior indian," but in La Paz jazz bars it's decidedly cool. In the Andes and elsewhere, the commodification of indianness has impacted urban lifestyles as people co-opt indigenous cultures for qualities that emphasize the uniqueness of their national culture. This volume looks at how metropolitan ideas of nation employed by politicians, the media and education are produced, reproduced, and contested by people of the rural Andes—people who have long been regarded as ethnically and racially distinct from more culturally European urban citizens. Yet these peripheral "natives" are shown to be actively engaged with the idea of the nation in their own communities, forcing us to re-think the ways in which indigeneity is defined by its marginality. The contributors examine the ways in which numerous identities—racial, generational, ethnic, regional, national, gender, and sexual—are both mutually informing and contradictory among subaltern Andean people who are more likely now to claim an allegiance to a nation than ever before. Although indians are less often confronted with crude assimilationist policies, they continue to face racism and discrimination as they struggle to assert an identity that is more than a mere refraction of the dominant culture. Yet despite the language of multiculturalism employed even in constitutional reform, any assertion of indian identity is likely to be resisted. By exploring topics as varied as nation-building in the 1930s or the chuqila dance, these authors expose a paradox in the relation between indians and the nation: that the nation can be claimed as a source of power and distinct identity while simultaneously making some types of national imaginings unattainable. Whether dancing together or simply talking to one another, the people described in these essays are shown creating identity through processes that are inherently social and interactive. To sing, to eat, to weave . . . In the performance of these simple acts, bodies move in particular spaces and contexts and do so within certain understandings of gender, race and nation. Through its presentation of this rich variety of ethnographic and historical contexts, Natives Making Nation provides a finely nuanced view of contemporary Andean life. 
Price: 20.90 USD
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4 HINDERY, DERRICK; SUSANNA B. HECHT (FOREWORD). From Enron To Evo: Pipeline Politics, Global Environmentalism, And Indigenous Rights In Bolivia.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2014. First Peoples: New Directions in Indigenous Studies Series. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Throughout the Americas, a boom in oil, gas, and mining development has pushed the extractive frontier deeper into Indigenous territories. Centering on a long-term study of Enron and Shell's Cuiaba pipeline, From Enron to Evo traces the struggles of Bolivia's Indigenous peoples for self-determination over their lives and territories. In his analysis of their response to this encroaching development, author Derrick Hindery also sheds light on surprising similarities between neoliberal reform and the policies of the nation's first Indigenous president, Evo Morales. Drawing upon extensive interviews and document analysis, Hindery argues that many of the structural conditions created by neoliberal policies—including partial privatization of the oil and gas sector—still persist under Morales. Tactics employed by both Morales and his neoliberal predecessors utilize the rhetoric of environmental protection and Indigenous rights to justify oil, gas, mining, and road development in Indigenous territories and sensitive ecoregions. Indigenous peoples, while mindful of gains made during Morales's tenure, are increasingly dissatisfied with the administration's development model, particularly when it infringes upon their right to self-determination. From Enron to Evo demonstrates their dynamic and pragmatic strategies to cope with development and adversity, while also advancing their own aims. Offering a critique of both free-market piracy and the dilemmas of resource nationalism, this is a groundbreaking book for scholars, policy-makers, and advocates concerned with Indigenous politics, social movements, environmental justice, and resistance in an era of expanding resource development. "This volume will be useful for any reader wishing to see firsthand the effects of neoliberal policies and multilevel actors on environmental conditions and on indigenous livelihood."—CHOICE Reviews "From Enron to Evo is a very accessible and important book, one that captures so much of what defines contemporary Latin America. It deserves a wide readership."—Hispanic American Historical Review "Derrick Hindery has followed the Cuiaba pipeline for many years and many miles. Along the way he has excavated its complicated history and explored how the pipeline embodies the contradictions and chicaneries of Bolivian neoliberalism, as well as the tensions of Bolivian post-neoliberalism. This book brings together those years of work in a compelling 'must read' for scholars of Latin America, energy, and neoliberal governance."—Anthony Bebbington, editor of Social Conflict, Economic Development and Extractive Industry: Evidence from South America "There are no other recent works on the rapid emergence of new forms of natural resource politics in Latin America, even though this is increasingly becoming a major of area of interest in fields like anthropology, political science, geography, economics, and environmental studies."—Bret Gustafson, author of New Languages of the State: Indigenous Resurgence and the Politics of Knowledge in Bolivia "From Enron to Evo is rich in detail. Much of the history and geography of this region has not gotten much attention in the English language."—Kathleen Schroeder, contributor to Latin America in the 21st Century: Challenges and Solutions 
Price: 25.60 USD
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5 HINDERY, DERRICK; SUSANNA B. HECHT (FOREWORD). From Enron To Evo: Pipeline Politics, Global Environmentalism, And Indigenous Rights In Bolivia.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2014. First Peoples: New Directions in Indigenous Studies Series. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Throughout the Americas, a boom in oil, gas, and mining development has pushed the extractive frontier deeper into Indigenous territories. Centering on a long-term study of Enron and Shell's Cuiaba pipeline, From Enron to Evo traces the struggles of Bolivia's Indigenous peoples for self-determination over their lives and territories. In his analysis of their response to this encroaching development, author Derrick Hindery also sheds light on surprising similarities between neoliberal reform and the policies of the nation's first Indigenous president, Evo Morales. Drawing upon extensive interviews and document analysis, Hindery argues that many of the structural conditions created by neoliberal policies—including partial privatization of the oil and gas sector—still persist under Morales. Tactics employed by both Morales and his neoliberal predecessors utilize the rhetoric of environmental protection and Indigenous rights to justify oil, gas, mining, and road development in Indigenous territories and sensitive ecoregions. Indigenous peoples, while mindful of gains made during Morales's tenure, are increasingly dissatisfied with the administration's development model, particularly when it infringes upon their right to self-determination. From Enron to Evo demonstrates their dynamic and pragmatic strategies to cope with development and adversity, while also advancing their own aims. Offering a critique of both free-market piracy and the dilemmas of resource nationalism, this is a groundbreaking book for scholars, policy-makers, and advocates concerned with Indigenous politics, social movements, environmental justice, and resistance in an era of expanding resource development. "This volume will be useful for any reader wishing to see firsthand the effects of neoliberal policies and multilevel actors on environmental conditions and on indigenous livelihood."—CHOICE Reviews "From Enron to Evo is a very accessible and important book, one that captures so much of what defines contemporary Latin America. It deserves a wide readership."—Hispanic American Historical Review "Derrick Hindery has followed the Cuiaba pipeline for many years and many miles. Along the way he has excavated its complicated history and explored how the pipeline embodies the contradictions and chicaneries of Bolivian neoliberalism, as well as the tensions of Bolivian post-neoliberalism. This book brings together those years of work in a compelling 'must read' for scholars of Latin America, energy, and neoliberal governance."—Anthony Bebbington, editor of Social Conflict, Economic Development and Extractive Industry: Evidence from South America "There are no other recent works on the rapid emergence of new forms of natural resource politics in Latin America, even though this is increasingly becoming a major of area of interest in fields like anthropology, political science, geography, economics, and environmental studies."—Bret Gustafson, author of New Languages of the State: Indigenous Resurgence and the Politics of Knowledge in Bolivia "From Enron to Evo is rich in detail. Much of the history and geography of this region has not gotten much attention in the English language."—Kathleen Schroeder, contributor to Latin America in the 21st Century: Challenges and Solutions 
Price: 52.25 USD
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6 MARIA TAPIAS Embodied Protests: Emotions And Women's Health In Bolivia.
University of Illinois Press, Urbana and Chicago: 2015. h Hardcover as issued without dustjacket. Brand new book. 
How drastic economic reform ravaged women's quality of life In the late 1980s, the introduction of drastic economic policies left Bolivia with soaring unemployment, decreases in social services and living standards, and greater than ever income equality. The new direction reshaped Bolivians' aspirations, and altered their senses of identity and their relationships to one-another, work, and the state. Embodied Protests examines how Bolivia's hesitant courtship with globalization manifested in the visceral and emotional diseases that afflicted many Bolivian women. Drawing on case studies conducted among market- and working-class women in the provincial town of Punata, Maria Tapias examines how headaches and debilidad, so-called normal bouts of infant diarrhea, and the malaise oppressing whole communities were symptomatic of profound social suffering. She approaches the narratives of distress caused by poverty, domestic violence, and the failure of social networks as constituting the knowledge that shaped their understandings of well-being. At the crux of Tapias's definitive analysis is the idea that individual health perceptions, actions, and practices cannot be separated from local cultural narratives or from global and economic forces. Evocative and compassionate, Embodied Protests gives voice to the human costs of the ongoing neoliberal experiment. Maria Tapias is an associate professor of anthropology and an associate dean at Grinnell College. "Based on finely detailed ethnography, lovingly treated by an author who knows how to write."--Daniel M. Goldstein, author of Outlawed: Between Security and Rights in a Bolivian City "An engagingly written, and often moving, depiction of the lives of working class women in Bolivia and their stories of suffering and success navigating the social and political economic obstacles of everyday life in the twenty-first century. Throughout, the finely detailed analysis illuminates the cultural parameters of emotion and illness and the local politics of neoliberalism and we gain an appreciation for individuals' efforts to protest the distress in their lives and enhance the well-being of themselves and others. A clear contribution to the field."--Krista E. Van Vleet, author of Performing Kinship Narrative, Gender, and the Intimacies of Power in the Andes 
Price: 80.75 USD
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7 MARIA TAPIAS Embodied Protests: Emotions And Women's Health In Bolivia.
University of Illinois Press, Urbana and Chicago: 2015. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
How drastic economic reform ravaged women's quality of life In the late 1980s, the introduction of drastic economic policies left Bolivia with soaring unemployment, decreases in social services and living standards, and greater than ever income equality. The new direction reshaped Bolivians' aspirations, and altered their senses of identity and their relationships to one-another, work, and the state. Embodied Protests examines how Bolivia's hesitant courtship with globalization manifested in the visceral and emotional diseases that afflicted many Bolivian women. Drawing on case studies conducted among market- and working-class women in the provincial town of Punata, Maria Tapias examines how headaches and debilidad, so-called normal bouts of infant diarrhea, and the malaise oppressing whole communities were symptomatic of profound social suffering. She approaches the narratives of distress caused by poverty, domestic violence, and the failure of social networks as constituting the knowledge that shaped their understandings of well-being. At the crux of Tapias's definitive analysis is the idea that individual health perceptions, actions, and practices cannot be separated from local cultural narratives or from global and economic forces. Evocative and compassionate, Embodied Protests gives voice to the human costs of the ongoing neoliberal experiment. Maria Tapias is an associate professor of anthropology and an associate dean at Grinnell College. "Based on finely detailed ethnography, lovingly treated by an author who knows how to write."--Daniel M. Goldstein, author of Outlawed: Between Security and Rights in a Bolivian City "An engagingly written, and often moving, depiction of the lives of working class women in Bolivia and their stories of suffering and success navigating the social and political economic obstacles of everyday life in the twenty-first century. Throughout, the finely detailed analysis illuminates the cultural parameters of emotion and illness and the local politics of neoliberalism and we gain an appreciation for individuals' efforts to protest the distress in their lives and enhance the well-being of themselves and others. A clear contribution to the field."--Krista E. Van Vleet, author of Performing Kinship Narrative, Gender, and the Intimacies of Power in the Andes 
Price: 26.60 USD
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