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NATIVE AMERICANS.

NATIVE AMERICANS.

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161 EDWARDS, TAI. Osage Women And Empire: Gender And Power.
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: 2018. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
The Osage empire, as most histories claim, was built by Osage men's prowess at hunting and war. But, as Tai S. Edwards observes in Osage Women and Empire, Osage cosmology defined men and women as necessary pairs; in their society, hunting and war, like everything else, involved both men and women. Only by studying the gender roles of both can we hope to understand the rise and fall of the Osage empire. In Osage Women and Empire, Edwards brings gender construction to the fore in the context of Osage history through the nineteenth century. Edwards's examination of the Osage gender construction reveals that the rise of their empire did not result in an elevation of men's status and a corresponding reduction in women's. Consulting a wealth of sources, both Osage and otherwise—ethnographies, government documents, missionary records, traveler narratives—Edwards considers how the first century and a half of colonization affected Osage gender construction. She shows how women and men built the Osage empire together. Once confronted with US settler colonialism, Osage men and women increasingly focused on hunting and trade to protect their culture, and their traditional social structures—including their system of gender complementarity—endured. Gender in fact functioned to maintain societal order and served as a central site for experiencing, adapting to, and resisting the monumental change brought on by colonization. Through the lens of gender, and by drawing on the insights of archaeology, ethnography, linguistics, and oral history, Osage Women and Empire presents a new, more nuanced picture of the critical role of men and women in the period when the Osage rose to power in the western Mississippi Valley and when that power later declined on their Kansas reservation. Tai S. Edwards is associate professor and director of the Kansas Studies Institute, Johnson County Community College, Overland Park, Kansas. "In her comprehensive analysis of gender roles throughout a critical period in Osage history, Tai S. Edwards demonstrates how attention to a Native American nation's deeply held beliefs in complementarity, autonomy, and balance allows us to understand indigenous resilience to colonization. Edwards does not simply add women to the story of the Osage empire. Rather, she proves that we cannot understand their creative and often successful adaptation without paying attention to the persistence of gendered values and behaviors. This book will change the way we understand the history of the southern plains."—Rose Stremlau, author of Sustaining the Cherokee Family: Kinship and the Allotment of an Indigenous Nation "An important new work that refutes the long-standing false stereotype of the male domination and abuse of women in Plains warrior societies. Edwards restores Osage women to their rightful place in an egalitarian, non-hierarchical indigenous system in which they were respected and essential participants in every aspect of Osage life while providing new insights regarding Osage resistance to, and selective adaption of, white norms under US colonialism. Important reading for students of indigenous history, women's studies, and settler colonialism."— Donna L. Akers, author of Living in the Land of Death: The Choctaw Nation, 1830-1860 
Price: 42.75 USD
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162 EDWARDS, TAI. Osage Women And Empire: Gender And Power.
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: 2018. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The Osage empire, as most histories claim, was built by Osage men's prowess at hunting and war. But, as Tai S. Edwards observes in Osage Women and Empire, Osage cosmology defined men and women as necessary pairs; in their society, hunting and war, like everything else, involved both men and women. Only by studying the gender roles of both can we hope to understand the rise and fall of the Osage empire. In Osage Women and Empire, Edwards brings gender construction to the fore in the context of Osage history through the nineteenth century. Edwards's examination of the Osage gender construction reveals that the rise of their empire did not result in an elevation of men's status and a corresponding reduction in women's. Consulting a wealth of sources, both Osage and otherwise—ethnographies, government documents, missionary records, traveler narratives—Edwards considers how the first century and a half of colonization affected Osage gender construction. She shows how women and men built the Osage empire together. Once confronted with US settler colonialism, Osage men and women increasingly focused on hunting and trade to protect their culture, and their traditional social structures—including their system of gender complementarity—endured. Gender in fact functioned to maintain societal order and served as a central site for experiencing, adapting to, and resisting the monumental change brought on by colonization. Through the lens of gender, and by drawing on the insights of archaeology, ethnography, linguistics, and oral history, Osage Women and Empire presents a new, more nuanced picture of the critical role of men and women in the period when the Osage rose to power in the western Mississippi Valley and when that power later declined on their Kansas reservation. Tai S. Edwards is associate professor and director of the Kansas Studies Institute, Johnson County Community College, Overland Park, Kansas. "In her comprehensive analysis of gender roles throughout a critical period in Osage history, Tai S. Edwards demonstrates how attention to a Native American nation's deeply held beliefs in complementarity, autonomy, and balance allows us to understand indigenous resilience to colonization. Edwards does not simply add women to the story of the Osage empire. Rather, she proves that we cannot understand their creative and often successful adaptation without paying attention to the persistence of gendered values and behaviors. This book will change the way we understand the history of the southern plains."—Rose Stremlau, author of Sustaining the Cherokee Family: Kinship and the Allotment of an Indigenous Nation "An important new work that refutes the long-standing false stereotype of the male domination and abuse of women in Plains warrior societies. Edwards restores Osage women to their rightful place in an egalitarian, non-hierarchical indigenous system in which they were respected and essential participants in every aspect of Osage life while providing new insights regarding Osage resistance to, and selective adaption of, white norms under US colonialism. Important reading for students of indigenous history, women's studies, and settler colonialism."— Donna L. Akers, author of Living in the Land of Death: The Choctaw Nation, 1830-1860 
Price: 23.70 USD
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163 EGAN, FEROL. Sand In A Whirlwind: The Paiute Indian War Of 1860, 30th Anniversary Edition.
University of Nevada Press, Reno: 2002. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Sand in a Whirlwind is a dramatic account of the events surrounding hostilities between settlers and Pyramid Paiutes in the spring of 1860. Thirty years after its publication Ferol Egan's now classic tale continues to enlighten and engage readers. As a native Californian from Gold Rush country, Ferol Egan developed a love for the American West at an early age. A writer, retired teacher, and historian, Egan is the author of six books including Frmont: Explorer for a Restless Nation, for which he won the Gold Medal for nonfiction from the Commonwealth Club of California. He received the Silver Medal for Sand in a Whirlwind and the California Medal for The El Dorado Trail. He now resides in Berkeley, California. "In this excellently researched and beautifully written book, Ferol Egan has been able to successfully do a very difficult thing—combine reliable historical fact with his own philosophy and sympathy for the Indians. . . . This is a fine example of a brilliant writer taking a historical event and, by vivid description of the climate and geography and by an imaginative but realistic characterization of the leaders of both the Indians and the whites, giving the historical event new meaning and significance." —Pacific Historian "Their tragic story is vividly told with perspective, awareness, sympathy, balance, and honesty. Whether describing nature, major characters, or action, Egan authoritatively conveys judgment without being hypercritical, sympathy without being biased, and drama without being histrionic. Making the difficult seem facile and intertwining the intricacies of a complex war in a masterful fashion, he presents a brilliant examination of both sides of a neglected chapter in the history of the white conquest of the Indians." —Library Journal "Egan created a novel based on historical facts, then strengthened the fiber with lifelike fiction. He succeeded in weaving his story on a balance wheel of good and bad to place the Pyramid Paiutes in a stronger, more peaceful light. One century too late." —Jack Fleming, Ely Daily Times "Sand in a Whirlwind is a tragic story, yet told with sympathy, vividness and honesty. This is Nevada history and if you have not read this book, I urge you to do so. If you have read it, I urge you to reread it." —Mary Crawford, Nevada State Museum Newsletter 
Price: 25.60 USD
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164 ELLIS, CLYDE. To Change Them Forever: Indian Education At The Rainy Mountain Boarding School, 1893-1920.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2008. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
A case history of the U.S. attempt to assimilate American Indians Reservation boarding schools represented an important component in the U.S. government's campaign in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century to "civilize" American Indians according to Anglo-American standards. The history of the Rainy Mountain School in southwestern Oklahoma reveals much about the form and function of the Indian policy and its consequences for the Kiowa children who attended the school. In To Change Them Forever, Clyde Ellis surveys changes in government policy and tells how the Kiowa people resisted and accommodated the efforts of school personnel to transform them. Ellis combines archival research with personal memoirs, conversations with former students, and the school's official records to portray a school often at odds with official policy and frequently neglected by the Indian Service's bureaucracy. 21 Illustrations, 2 maps, 276 pages, 5.5" x 8.5". Clyde Ellis is Professor of History at Elon University, Elon, North Carolina. He is author of A Dancing People: Powwow Culture on the Southern Plains. To Change Them Forever was the winner of the 1997 Gustavus Myers Award for the Outstanding Work on Intolerance in North America. "A welcome addition to the study of cultural transformation and Indian struggle for survival."—Southern Historian 
Price: 20.85 USD
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165 ERDOES, RICHARD; ORTIZ, ALFONSO (EDITORS). American Indian: Myths And Legends.
Pantheon Books, New York: 1984. 0394740181 / 9780394740188 s Softcover. Very good condition. 
" This fine, valuable new gathering of Turtle Island tales is truly alive, mysterious, and wonderful - overflowing, that is, with wonder, mystery, and life". - Peter Matthiessen. 
Price: 7.13 USD
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166 ERICKSON, KIRSTIN C. Yaqui Homeland And Homeplace: The Everyday Production Of Ethnic Identity.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2008. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
In this illuminating book, anthropologist Kirstin Erickson explains how members of the Yaqui tribe, an indigenous group in northern Mexico, construct, negotiate, and continually reimagine their ethnic identity. She examines two interconnected dimensions of the Yaqui ethnic imagination: the simultaneous processes of place making and identification, and the inseparability of ethnicity from female-identified spaces, roles, and practices. Yaquis live in a portion of their ancestral homeland in Sonora, about 250 miles south of the Arizona border. A long history of displacement and ethnic struggle continues to shape the Yaqui sense of self, as Erickson discovered during the sixteen months that she lived in Potam, one of the eight historic Yaqui pueblos. She found that themes of identity frequently arise in the stories that Yaquis tell and that geography and location—space and place—figure prominently in their narratives. Revisiting Edward Spicer's groundbreaking anthropological study of the Yaquis of Potam pueblo undertaken more than sixty years ago, Erickson pays particular attention to the "cultural work" performed by Yaqui women today. She shows that by reaffirming their gendered identities and creating and occupying female-gendered spaces such as kitchens, household altars, and domestic ceremonial spaces, women constitute Yaqui ethnicity in ways that are as significant as actions taken by males in tribal leadership and public ceremony. This absorbing study contributes new empirical knowledge about a Native American community as it adds to the growing anthropology of space/place and gender. By inviting readers into the homes and patios where Yaqui women discuss their lives, it offers a highly personalized account of how they construct—and reconstruct—their identity. "Erickson's writing is rich and eloquent because she maintains focus on her collaborators rather than digress into the theoretical exgeses called for in this review." — Journal of Folklore Research 
Price: 23.70 USD
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167 FARR, WILLIAM E. Blackfoot Redemption: A Blood Indian's Story Of Murder, Confinement, And Imperfect Justice.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2012. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
In 1879, a Canadian Blackfoot known as Spopee, or Turtle, shot and killed a white man. Captured as a fugitive, Spopee narrowly escaped execution, instead landing in an insane asylum in Washington, D.C., where he fell silent. Spopee thus "disappeared" for more than thirty years, until a delegation of American Blackfeet discovered him and, aided by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, exacted a pardon from President Woodrow Wilson. After re-emerging into society like a modern-day Rip Van Winkle, Spopee spent the final year of his life on the Blackfeet Reservation in Montana, in a world that had changed irrevocably from the one he had known before his confinement. Blackfoot Redemption is the riveting account of Spopee's unusual and haunting story. To reconstruct the events of Spopee's life—at first traceable only through bits and pieces of information—William E. Farr conducted exhaustive archival research, digging deeply into government documents and institutional reports to build a coherent and accurate narrative and, through this reconstruction, win back one Indian's life and identity. In revealing both certainties and ambiguities in Spopee's story, Farr relates a larger story about racial dynamics and prejudice, while poignantly evoking the turbulent final days of the buffalo-hunting Indians before their confinement, loss of freedom, and confusion that came with the wrenching transition to reservation life. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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168 FEDER, NORMAN. American Indian Art.
Harry N. Abrams, Inc., New York: 1973. New Shorter Edition. s Softcover. Fair condition. A small piece of the cover is missing at the top of the spine as well as on the front and back covers. 
An overview of American Indian Art as it is likely to be of interest to collectors of such artifacts. 
Price: 9.49 USD
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169 FEEST, CHRISTIAN F. & C. RONALD CORUM (EDITORS). Frederick Weygold: Artist And Ethnographer Of North American Indians.
ZKF Publishers: 2017 h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Frederick Weygold (1870-1941), American artist and self-trained ethnographer, is today almost unknown outside German-speaking Europe. This book, based upon the voluminous body of his paintings, drawings, and papers held by the Speed Art Museum in Louisville, Kentucky, and upon research in American and European museums and archives, offers for the first time a comprehensive account of Weygold's life and achievements as an artist, collector, educator, and social activist. Born in St. Charles, Missouri, Weygold studied languages and art in Germany and Philadelphia before settling in Louisville in 1908. In Europe, Weygold became fascinated with American Indians, taught himself the Lakota language, and began his lifelong study of Native American art by drawing early objects from the Plains in German museum collections. In Philadelphia he did "fieldwork" with Lakotas working for Wild West shows and collected Lakota texts and drawings. In 1909 he went to the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota, acquiring Native artifacts for the Museum of Ethnology in Hamburg and documenting in photographs Lakota life and culture, including the first photographic record of the Plains Indian sign language. He later used his ethnographic expertise in a series of oil paintings and to illustrate books by the Dakota author Charles Eastman and by the western writers James Willard Schultz and Stanley Vestal. Weygold also gained local recognition for his painting of the iconic "Old Kentucky Home" and was involved in the movement to save Cumberland Falls from being developed into a source of hydroelectric power. Over time, Weygold built a personal collection of Native American artifacts he later donated to the Speed Museum, which now forms the core of the museum's holdings. This book features selected examples from his work as a painter, illustrator, photographer, and collector of American Indian art and artifacts. 379 color and 92 black-and-white Illustrations, 272 pages, 9" x 10.5". Christian F. Feest was Professor of Anthropology at the Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main and Director of the Museum of Ethnology in Vienna. His research interests focus on visual arts and material culture, the history of anthropology, the ethnohistory and historical ethnography of eastern North America, central Mexico and central Brazil, and the anthropology of visual representation. C. Ronald Corum is a research neurophysiologist and the author of numerous medical, scientific, and historical publications. In the 1970s he actively engaged with the Lakotas and their culture, learning their language from a person who had learned it from Weygold, and has researched the artist's life for more than forty years. 
Price: 29.40 USD
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170 FELVER, CHRISTOPHER (PHOTOGRAPHS) WITH A FOREWORD BY SIMON J. ORTIZ & AN INTRODUCTION BY LINDA HOGAN. Tending The Fire: Native Voices And Portraits.
University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque: 2017. 
Christopher Felver's Tending the Fire celebrates the poets and writers who represent the wide range of Native American voices in literature today. In these commanding portraits, Felver's distinctive visual signature and unobtrusive presence capture each artist's strength, integrity, and character. Accompanying each portrait is a handwritten poem or prose piece that helps reveal the origin of the poet's language and legends. As the individuals share their unique voices, Tending the Fire introduces us to the diversity and complexity of Native culture through the authors' generous and passionate stories. Felver's insightful epilogue reminds us that "Native Americans today are as modern as the Space Age, and each in their own way carries forth the cultural heritage 'from whence they came.' Their abiding legacy as the first people of this continent has found its voice in the hard-won wisdom of their art and activism. Let's learn from this belated opportunity to look and listen to these Native voices." Featured authors include: Francisco X. Alarcon; Sherman Alexie; Indira Allegra; Paula Gunn Allen; Crisosto Apache; Annette Arkeketa; Jimmy Santiago Baca; Dennis Banks; Jim Barnes; Kimberly L. Becker; Duane Big Eagle; Sherwin Bitsui; Julian Talamantez Brolaski; Lauralee Brown; Joseph Bruchac; Annette Saunooke Clapsaddle; Elizabeth Cook-Lynn; Jonny Cournoyer; Alice Crow; Lucille Lang Day; Susan Deer Cloud; Ramona Emerson; Heid E. Erdrich; Louise Erdrich Pura F; Jennifer Elise Foerster; Eric Gansworth; Diane Glancy; Jewelle Gomez; Rain Gomez; Sequoyah Guess; Q.R. Hand, Jr.; Joy Harjo; Allison Hedge Coke; Travis Hedge Coke; Lance Henson; Trace Lara Hentz; Ins Hernandez-Avila; Charlie Hill; Roberta Hill; Geary Hobson; Linda Hogan; LeAnne Howe; Andrew Jolivtte; em jollie; Joan Naviyuk Kane; Maurice Kenny; Bruce King; Sharmagne Leland-St.John; Chip Livingston; Charly Lowry; James Luna; Lee Marmon; Molly McGlennen; Russell Means; Deborah Miranda; Gail Mitchell; N. Scott Momaday; Catherine Nelson-Rodriguez; Linda Noel; dg nanouk okpik; Simon J. Ortiz; Laura Ortman; A. Kay Oxendine; Juanita Pahdopony; Evan Pritchard; Mary Grace Pewewardy; Ishmael Reed; Martha Redbone; Bobby J. Richardson; Ladonna Evans Richardson; Barbara Robidoux; Linda Rodriguez; Wendy Rose; Kurt Schweigman; Kim Shuck; Cedar Sigo; Leslie Marmon Silko; Arigon Starr; James Thomas Stevens; Ins Talamantez; Luci Tapahanso; Nazbah Tom; Cecil Taylor; Rebecca Hatcher Travis; David Treuer; Terra Trevor; Quincy Troupe; John Trudell; Gerald Vizenor; Elissa Washuta; Floyd Redcrow Westerman; Orlando White; Kim Wieser; Diane Wilson; Elizabeth A. Woody. Felver's portraits, and excerpts from Native American writers, emphasize the interconnectedness of Native communities. . . . A compelling visual and literary introduction to indigenous American authors. 9 x 11 in., 248 pages, 197 duotones. Christopher Felver's previous books include American Jukebox: A Photographic Journey, The Importance of Being, The Late Great Allen Ginsberg: A Photo Biography, The Poet Exposed, and Ferlinghetti Portrait. His photographs are distributed worldwide and collected by museums and university libraries. They have been featured in international exhibitions, including the Centre Pompidou, London's National Theatre, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the National Gallery of Art, and MOCA. 
Price: 47.45 USD
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171 FENTON, WILLIAM N. The Great Law And The Longhouse: A Political History Of The Iroquois Confederacy.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2010. First Edition. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
This masterful summary represents a major synthesis of the history and culture of the Six Nations from the mid-sixteenth century to the Canandaigua treaty of 1794. William N. Fenton, renowned as the dean of Iroquoian studies, draws on primary sources, in both French and English to create a readable narrative and an invaluable reference for all future scholars of Iroquois polity. Central to Fenton's study is the tradition of the Great Law, still practiced today by the conservative Iroquois. It is sustained by celebrations of the condolence ceremony when participants mourn a dead chief and install his successor for life on good behavior. This ritual act, reaching back to the dawn of history, maintained the League of the Iroquois, the legendary form of government that gave way over time to the Iroquois Confederacy. 
Price: 47.45 USD
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172 FERGUSSON, ERNA. Dancing Gods: Indian Ceremonials Of New Mexico And Arizona.
University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
One of the most remarkable features of life in the Southwest is the presence of Native American religious ceremonies in communities that are driving distance from Sunbelt cities. Many of these ceremonies are open to the public and Dancing Gods is the best single reference for visitors to dances at the Rio Grande Pueblos, Zuni Pueblo, the Hopi Mesas, and the Navajo and Apache reservations. Fergusson's classic guide to New Mexico and Arizona Indian ceremonies is once again available in print. It offers background information on the history and religion of the area's Native American peoples and describes the principal public ceremonies and some lesser-known dances that are rarely performed. Here is information on the major Pueblo rituals--the Corn Dance, Deer Dance, and Eagle Dance--as well as various dances at Zuni, including the complicated Shalako. Fergusson also describes the Hopi bean-planting and Niman Kachina ceremonies in addition to the Snake Dance, the Navajo Mountain Chant and Night Chant, and several Apache ceremonies. 6 x 9 in., 314 pages 13 halftones. Erna Fergusson (1888-1964) wrote widely on New Mexican themes and helped create tourism in the Southwest with her Indian Detours business. Tony Hillerman (1925-2008) was an award-winning author and newspaperman, best known for his mystery novels set on the Navajo Nation. "A clear, sympathetic, and informed introduction to these people and their ceremonies . . . should give every new onlooker a deeper appreciation of the dance which is really a prayer." --The Denver Post 
Price: 18.95 USD
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173 FERGUSSON, ERNA. Dancing Gods: Indian Ceremonials Of New Mexico And Arizona.
University of New Mexico Press. Albuquerque: 1970. 0826300332 / 9780826300331 s Softcover. Good condition. Cover is faded. 
One of the most remarkable features of life in the Southwest is the presence of Native American religious ceremonies in communities that are driving distance from Sunbelt cities. Many of these ceremonies are open to the public and Dancing Gods is the best single reference for visitors to dances at the Rio Grande Pueblos, Zuni Pueblo, the Hopi Mesas, and the Navajo and Apache reservations. Fergusson's classic guide to New Mexico and Arizona Indian ceremonies is once again available in print. It offers background information on the history and religion of the area's Native American peoples and describes the principal public ceremonies and some lesser-known dances that are rarely performed. Here is information on the major Pueblo rituals--the Corn Dance, Deer Dance, and Eagle Dance--as well as various dances at Zuni, including the complicated Shalako. Fergusson also describes the Hopi bean-planting and Niman Kachina ceremonies in addition to the Snake Dance, the Navajo Mountain Chant and Night Chant, and several Apache ceremonies. "Still the best of all books about the Indian ceremonials of New Mexico and Arizona. . . .perceptive and simple, reverent and lucid."--Lawrence Clark Powell, Southwest Classics 
Price: 7.84 USD
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174 FISHER, VARDIS. Pemmican: A Novel Of The Old Hudson Bay Company.
Doubleday & Company, Garden City: 1956. First Edition (Unstated). h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Good condition considering its age. 

Price: 27.79 USD
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175 FITZGERALD, STEPHANIE J. Native Women And Land: Narratives Of Dispossession And Resurgence.
University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque. Studies in American Indian Literatures Series. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Winner of the 2015 Wordcraft Circle Honor and Award for Academic Book "What roles do literary and community texts and social media play in the memory, politics, and lived experience of those dispossessed?" Fitzgerald asks this question in her introduction and sets out to answer it in her study of literature and social media by (primarily) Native women who are writing about and often actively protesting against displacement caused both by forced relocation and environmental disaster. By examining a range of diverse materials, including the writings of canonical Native American writers such as Louise Erdrich, Linda Hogan, and Elizabeth Cook-Lynn, and social media sites such as YouTube and Facebook, this work brings new focus to analyzing how indigenous communities and authors relate to land, while also exploring broader connections to literary criticism, environmental history and justice, ecocriticism, feminist studies, and new media studies. 6 x 9 in., 176 pages, 2 halftones. Stephanie J. Fitzgerald is an assistant professor of English at the University of Kansas. She is the coeditor of Keepers of the Morning Star: An Anthology of Native Women's Theater. "Fitzgerald offers a concentrated scrutiny that should attract a broad readership. No one should doubt her powerful intellectual weight and resourcefulness. . . . Essential." --Choice "An excellent choice for anyone interested in Native land tenure as well as for scholars in American Indian studies, women's studies, ecocriticism, and environmental justice studies. Highly recommended." --Great Plains Quarterly 
Price: 28.45 USD
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176 FIXICO, DONALD L. " That's What They Used To Say" Reflections On American Indian Oral Traditions.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2017. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
As a child growing up in rural Oklahoma, Donald Fixico often heard "hvmakimata"—"that's what they used to say"—a phrase Mvskoke Creeks and Seminoles use to end stories. In his latest work, Fixico, who is Shawnee, Sac and Fox, Mvskoke Creek, and Seminole, invites readers into his own oral tradition to learn how storytelling, legends and prophecies, oral histories, and creation myths knit together and explain the Indian world. Interweaving the storytelling and traditions of his ancestors, Fixico conveys the richness and importance of oral culture in Native communities and demonstrates the power of the spoken word to bring past and present together, creating a shared reality both immediate and historical for Native peoples. Fixico's stories conjure war heroes and ghosts, inspire fear and laughter, explain the past and foresee the future—and through them he skillfully connects personal, familial, tribal, and Native history. Oral tradition, Fixico affirms, at once reflects and creates the unique internal reality of each Native community. Stories possess spiritual energy, and by summoning this energy, storytellers bring their communities together. Sharing these stories, and the larger story of where they come from and how they work, "That's What They Used to Say" offers readers rare insight into the oral traditions at the very heart of Native cultures, in all of their rich and infinitely complex permutations. 19 black-and-white Illustrations, Hardcover, 272 pages, 6" x 9". Donald L. Fixico (Shawnee, Sac and Fox, Mvskoke Creek, and Seminole) is Distinguished Foundation Professor of History and Distinguished Scholar of Sustainability in the Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability at Arizona State University. He is the author or editor of 13 books, including Call for Change: The Medicine Way of American Indian History, Ethos, and Reality. "Once again Donald L. Fixico has produced a provocative work. In 'That's What They Used to Say,' he engages the reader in his examination of Indian oral tradition, interweaving his own autobiography throughout."—Blue Clark, author of Indian Tribes of Oklahoma: A Guide "Donald L. Fixico's stories give us a rich understanding of the power of storytelling in shaping Native community. Fixico's compassion and wry humor bring us together in a difficult time." —Margaret Connell-Szasz,author of Scottish Highlanders and Native Americans: Indigenous Education in the Eighteenth Century Atlantic World "In this chronicle of the importance of storytelling in the Native American experience, Donald L. Fixico provides insights into the spiritual energy of oral tradition, illustrating that stories are much more than just stories." —R. David Edmunds, author of The Potawatomis: Keepers of the Fire 
Price: 34.15 USD
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177 FLEMING, PAULA RICHARDSON & LUSKEY, JUDITH. The North American Indians In Early Photographs.
Borders: 2000. 0681465719 / 9780681465718 Fourth Printing. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Very good condition. 
The three hundred magnificent photographs in this book offer a unique record of the Indians of North America, as seen by the early photographers. From the first pictures, prompted by curiosity and a sense of adventure, to the later images capturing the strangeness, turmoil and pathos of change in the Indian way of life, these photographs document the confrontation of white and Indian cultures, from the first peaceful negotiations, military clashes and uncertain expeditions into into new territories, through integration in schools and reservations. Includes an Index. 
Price: 47.98 USD
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178 FONTANA, BERNARD L; SCHAEFER, JOHN P(PHOTOGRAPHY). Tarahumara: Where Night Is The Day Of The Moon.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Inhabiting the Sierra Madre Occidental of southwestern Chihuahua in Mexico, the Tarahumara (or Raramuri) are known in their language as the "foot runners" due to the way in which they must navigate their rugged terrain. This book offers an accessible ethnography of their history, customs, and current life, accompanied by photographs that offer striking images of these gentle people. The subtitle of the book derives from the Tarahumar's belief that the soul works at night while the body sleeps and that during this "day of the moon" both the spirits of the dead and the souls of the living move about in their mysterious ways. As the authors observe, the fact that "so many men, women, and children persist in distinctive, centuries-old cultural traditions in spite of their nearness to all the complexities and attractions of modern industrial society is an importatn part of the story." Their book tells that story and brings readers closer to understanding the Tarahumara world and way of life. 
Price: 21.80 USD
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179 FOREMAN, GRANT; DEBO, ANGIE (FOREWORD). Indian Removal: The Emigration Of The Five Civilized Tribes Of Indians.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 1953. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
It is unlikely that any single book or document will ever earn a more firmly-fixed position of respect and authority than this distinguished volume by Grant Foreman. Originally published in 1932, on the date of the hundredth anniversary of the arrival in Oklahoma of the first Indians as a result of the United States government's relocation of the Five Civilized Tribes, Indian Removal remains today the definitive book in its field. The forcible uprooting and expulsion of the 60,000 Indians comprising the Five Civilized Tribes, including the Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek, Cherokee, and Seminole, unfolded a story without parallel in the history of the United States. For more than a decade thousands of tragedies and experiences of absorbing interest marked the removal over the "Trail of Tears," but there were no chroniclers at hand to record them. Only occasionally did the tragedy and pathos of some phase of this history-making undertaking beguile a sympathetic officer to turn from routine and write a line or a paragraph of comment. From fragments in thousands of manuscripts and in official and unofficial reports Grant Foreman gleaned the materials for this book to provide readers with an unbiased day-by-day recital of events. 
Price: 18.95 USD
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180 FORTUNATE EAGLE, ADAM & FINDLEY, TIM; DELORIA, JR., VINE (FOREWORD. Heart Of The Rock: The Indian Invasion Of Alcatraz.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2002. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
In 1969, Ricahrd Oakes and Adam Fortunate Eagle, then known as Adam Nordwall, instigated an invasion of Alcatraz by American Indians. From the mainland, Fortunate Eagle orchestrated the events, but they assumed an uncontrollable life of their own. Fortunate Eagle provides an intimate memoir of the occupation and the events leading up to it. Accompanied by a variety of photographs capturing the people, places, and actions involved, Heart of the Rock brings these turbulent times vividly to life. From the start, public support was strong. Money poured in from around the country. Sausalito sailors and their "navy" transported supplies and people to the island. San Francisco restaurants sent Thanksgiving dinner. A school was started; chores and responsibilities were shared by everyone. Alcatraz became home, and American Indians of all tribes became a family. But the occupation lasted two years, and Oakes, who had become its spokesman, left after his stepdaughter's death on the island. Memoranda from the White House recommended doing "anything" to turn the public against the occupation so it could be ended. Water and electricity were cut off, reports of conflict on the island began appearing in the press, and suspicious fires burned five buildings. Nevertheless, the occupation of Alcatraz remains what historian Vine Deloria, Jr. has called "perhaps the most significant Indian action since the Little Bighorn." Vine Deloria, Jr., Professor of Political Science at the University of Arizona, is the author of a number of books and articles on events affecting the lives of American Indians. He serves as the Executive Director of the National Congress of American Indians and is an active spokesman and leader for the American Indian community throughout the nation. Adam Fortunate Eagle, an enrolled member of the Ojibwe Nation, is the author of Heart of the Rock: The Indian Invasion of Alcatraz. He currently resides on the Fallon Indian Reservation in Nevada. "The text covers some of the nuts and bolts—but mostly it spotlights the men, women, and children who saw in the Alcatraz invasion a chance to speak out to the world. A valuable resource for anyone interested in Native American history." - Booklist "Fortunate Eagle's witty and impassioned recollections will be appreciated by anyone interested in American history or the political upheavals of the 1960's." - Publishers Weekly 
Price: 18.95 USD
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