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AMERICAN WEST.

AMERICAN WEST.

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181 HANDLEY, WILLIAM R. & LEWIS, NATHANIEL (EDITORS). True West: Authenticity And The American West.
University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln: 2004. Postwestern Horizons Series. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
In no other region of the United States has the notion of authenticity played such an important yet elusive role as it has in the West. Though pervasive in literature, popular culture, and history, assumptions about western authenticity have not received adequate critical attention. Given the ongoing economic and social transformations in this vast region, the persistent nostalgia and desire for the "real" authentic West suggest regional and national identities at odds with themselves. True West explores the concept of authenticity as it is used to invent, test, advertise, and read the West. The fifteen essays collected here apply contemporary critical and cultural theory to western literary history, Native American literature and identities, the visual West, and the imagining of place. Ranging geographically from the Canadian Prairies to Buena Park's Entertainment Corridor in Southern California, and chronologically from early tourist narratives to contemporary environmental writing, True West challenges many assumptions we make about western writing and opens the door to an important new chapter in western literary history and cultural criticism. William R. Handley is an associate professor of English at the University of Southern California. He is the author of Marriage, Violence, and Nation in the American Literary West. Nathaniel Lewis is an associate professor of English at Saint Michael's College and the author of Unsettling the Literary West: Authenticity and Authorship (Nebraska 2003). "At last, William Handley and Nathaniel Lewis have tackled the slippery slope of what authenticity means to the West. . . . [An] excellent first work in the daunting task of exploring the deep interweaving between authenticity and our frontier origins."—Kevin Britz, Journal of Arizona History "True West is a herald of change in the air—a promise of a regenerated critical assault on literature that may be western but is also among the finest being produced in English today, and to be valued for that as much or more than for its regional provenance."—Lee Clark Mitchell, Western American Literature "The approaches as well as the topics are wide-ranging, up-to-date, and presented in innovative ways. . . . I find True West among the most provocative collections I recently have read. I recommend it highly."—Ann Ronald, Western Historical Quarterly "True West reminds us that the relentless search for authenticity is a quest for something that is elusive—and perhaps wholly illusory." —Jonathan Kirsch, Los Angeles Times Book Review "The fifteen essays in this outstanding collection clarify how authenticity has functioned in cultural and literary settings. Instead of simply distinguishing the 'fake' from the 'authentic,' they explore the nature and consequences of quests for and claims to authenticity. Readers interested in the Great Plains will find rewarding essays on literature, environment, and the uses of American Indian history. . . . Thematically tight and imaginatively broad, a testament to the skill and vision of its editors. An extensive bibliography enhances its usefulness for scholars."—Ellen Baker, Great Plains Quarterly 
Price: 47.45 USD
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182 HANDLEY, WILLIAM R. & LEWIS, NATHANIEL (EDITORS). True West: Authenticity And The American West.
University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln: 2007. Postwestern Horizons Series. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
In no other region of the United States has the notion of authenticity played such an important yet elusive role as it has in the West. Though pervasive in literature, popular culture, and history, assumptions about western authenticity have not received adequate critical attention. Given the ongoing economic and social transformations in this vast region, the persistent nostalgia and desire for the "real" authentic West suggest regional and national identities at odds with themselves. True West explores the concept of authenticity as it is used to invent, test, advertise, and read the West. The fifteen essays collected here apply contemporary critical and cultural theory to western literary history, Native American literature and identities, the visual West, and the imagining of place. Ranging geographically from the Canadian Prairies to Buena Park's Entertainment Corridor in Southern California, and chronologically from early tourist narratives to contemporary environmental writing, True West challenges many assumptions we make about western writing and opens the door to an important new chapter in western literary history and cultural criticism. William R. Handley is an associate professor of English at the University of Southern California. He is the author of Marriage, Violence, and Nation in the American Literary West. Nathaniel Lewis is an associate professor of English at Saint Michael's College and the author of Unsettling the Literary West: Authenticity and Authorship (Nebraska 2003). "At last, William Handley and Nathaniel Lewis have tackled the slippery slope of what authenticity means to the West. . . . [An] excellent first work in the daunting task of exploring the deep interweaving between authenticity and our frontier origins."—Kevin Britz, Journal of Arizona History "True West is a herald of change in the air—a promise of a regenerated critical assault on literature that may be western but is also among the finest being produced in English today, and to be valued for that as much or more than for its regional provenance."—Lee Clark Mitchell, Western American Literature "The approaches as well as the topics are wide-ranging, up-to-date, and presented in innovative ways. . . . I find True West among the most provocative collections I recently have read. I recommend it highly."—Ann Ronald, Western Historical Quarterly "True West reminds us that the relentless search for authenticity is a quest for something that is elusive—and perhaps wholly illusory." —Jonathan Kirsch, Los Angeles Times Book Review "The fifteen essays in this outstanding collection clarify how authenticity has functioned in cultural and literary settings. Instead of simply distinguishing the 'fake' from the 'authentic,' they explore the nature and consequences of quests for and claims to authenticity. Readers interested in the Great Plains will find rewarding essays on literature, environment, and the uses of American Indian history. . . . Thematically tight and imaginatively broad, a testament to the skill and vision of its editors. An extensive bibliography enhances its usefulness for scholars."—Ellen Baker, Great Plains Quarterly 
Price: 18.00 USD
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183 HANSEN, RON. The Assassination Of Jesse James By The Coward Robert Ford.
Alfred A. Knopf, New York: 1983. 0394516478 / 9780394516479 First Edition. h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Good condition. 

Price: 36.34 USD
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184 HARDY, B. CARMON. Doing The Works Of Abraham: Mormon Polygamy - Its Origin, Practice, And Demise.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2007. Volume 9 in Kingdom in the West: The Mormons and the American Frontier. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Winner: Best Documentary Book Award from the Utah State Historical Society. Celestial Marriage—the "doctrine of the plurality of wives"—polygamy. No issue in the history of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (popularly known as the Mormon Church) has attracted more attention. From its contentious and secretive beginnings in the 1830s to its public proclamation in 1852, and through almost four decades of bitter conflict with the federal government to Church renunciation of the practice in 1890, this belief helped define a new religious identity and unify the Mormon people, just as it scandalized their neighbors and handed their enemies the most effective weapon they wielded in their battle against Mormon theocracy. This newest addition to the Kingdom in the West Series provides the basic documents supporting and challenging Mormon polygamy, supported by the concise commentary and documentation of editor B. Carmon Hardy. Plural marriage is everywhere at hand in Mormon history. However, despite its omnipresence, including a broad and continuing stream of publications devoted to it, few attempts have been made to assemble a documentary history of the topic. Hardy has drawn on years of research and writing on the controversial and complex subject to make this narrative collection of documents illuminating and myth-shattering. The second "relic of barbarism," as the Republican Party platform of 1856 characterized polygamy, was believed by the Saints to be God's law, trumping the laws of a mere republic. The long struggle for what was, and for some fundamentalists remains, religious freedom still resonates in American religious law. Throughout the West, thousands of families continue the practice, even In the face of LDS Church opposition. The book includes a bibliography and an index. It is bound in rich blue linen cloth, two-color foil stamped spine and front cover. Carmon Hardy is an Emeritus Professor of History at California State University, Fullerton, where he still teaches. He is the author of Solemn Covenant: The Mormon Polygamous Passage (1992), which was awarded the best book award by the Mormon Historical Association. In addition to his extensive published writings on Mormonism, he has also published in the fields of American Constitutional History and the History of Religion. 
Price: 29.40 USD
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185 HARRIS, MATTHEW L. & BUCKLEY, JAY H. (EDITORS). Zebulon Pike, Thomas Jefferson, And The Opening Of The American West.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2012. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Seven prominent historians reassess the explorer for whom Pikes Peak was named. In life and in death, fame and glory eluded Zebulon Montgomery Pike (1779-1813). The ambitious young military officer and explorer, best known for a mountain peak that he neither scaled nor named, was destined to live in the shadows of more famous/contemporaries—explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark. This collection of thought-provoking essays rescues Pike from his undeserved obscurity. It does so by providing a nuanced assessment of Pike and his actions within the larger context of American imperial ambition in the time of Jefferson. Pike's accomplishments as an explorer and mapmaker and as a soldier during the War of 1812 have been tainted by his alleged connection to Aaron Burr's conspiracy to separate the trans-Appalachian region from the United States. For two hundred years historians have debated whether Pike was an explorer or a spy, whether he knew about the Burr Conspiracy or was just a loyal foot soldier. This book moves beyond that controversy to offer new scholarly perspectives on Pike's career. The essayists—all prominent historians of the American West—examine Pike's expeditions and writings, which provided an image of the Southwest that would shape American culture for decades. John Logan Allen explores Pike's contributions to science and cartography; James P. Ronda and Leo E. Oliva address his relationships with Native peoples and Spanish officials; Jay H. Buckley chronicles Pike's life and compares Pike to other Jeffersonian explorers; Jared Orsi discusses the impact of his expeditions on the environment; and William E. Foley examines his role in Burr's conspiracy. Together the essays assess Pike's accomplishments and shortcomings as an explorer, soldier, empire builder, and family man. Pike's 1810 journals and maps gave Americans an important glimpse of the headwaters of the Mississippi and the southwestern borderlands, and his account of the opportunities for trade between the Mississippi Valley and New Mexico offered a blueprint for the Santa Fe Trail. This volume is the first in more than a generation to offer new scholarly perspectives on the career of an overlooked figure in the opening of the American West. Matthew L. Harris is Associate Professor of History at Colorado State University-Pueblo and coeditor of The Founding Fathers and the Debate over Religion in Revolutionary America: A History in Documents. Jay H. Buckley Jay H. Buckley is Associate Professor of History at Brigham Young University, coauthor of By His Own Hand? The Mysterious Death of Meriwether Lewis, and author of William Clark: Indian Diplomat. 
Price: 28.45 USD
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186 HARVEY, THOMAS J. Rainbow Bridge To Monument Valley: Making The Modern Old West.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2011. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
A cultural history of America's red rock desert landmarks The Colorado River Plateau is home to two of the best-known landscapes in the world: Rainbow Bridge in southern Utah and Monument Valley on the Utah-Arizona border. Twentieth-century popular culture made these places icons of the American West, and advertising continues to exploit their significance today. In Rainbow Bridge to Monument Valley, Thomas J. Harvey artfully tells how Navajos and Anglo-Americans created fabrics of meaning out of this stunning desert landscape, space that western novelist Zane Grey called "the storehouse of unlived years," where a rugged, more authentic life beckoned. Harvey explores the different ways in which the two societies imbued the landscape with deep cultural significance. Navajos long ago incorporated Rainbow Bridge into the complex origin story that embodies their religion and worldview. In the early 1900s, archaeologists crossed paths with Grey in the Rainbow Bridge area. Grey, credited with making the modern western novel popular, sought freedom from the contemporary world and reimagined the landscape for his own purposes. In the process, Harvey shows, Grey erased most of the Navajo inhabitants. This view of the landscape culminated in filmmaker John Ford's use of Monument Valley as the setting for his epic mid-twentieth-century Westerns. Harvey extends the story into the late twentieth century when environmentalists sought to set aside Rainbow Bridge as a symbolic remnant of nature untainted by modernization. Tourists continue to flock to Monument Valley and Rainbow Bridge, as they have for a century, but the landscapes are most familiar today because of their appearances in advertising. Monument Valley has been used to sell perfume, beer, and sport utility vehicles. Encompassing the history of the Navajo, archaeology, literature, film, environmentalism, and tourism, Rainbow Bridge to Monument Valley explores how these rock formations, Navajo sacred spaces still, have become embedded in the modern identity of the American West—and of the nation itself. Thomas J. Harvey is a reporter for the Salt Lake Tribune and co-editor of Imagining the Big Open: Nature, Identity, and Play in the New West. 
Price: 18.95 USD
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187 HARVEY, THOMAS J. Rainbow Bridge To Monument Valley: Making The Modern Old West.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2011. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
A cultural history of America's red rock desert landmarks The Colorado River Plateau is home to two of the best-known landscapes in the world: Rainbow Bridge in southern Utah and Monument Valley on the Utah-Arizona border. Twentieth-century popular culture made these places icons of the American West, and advertising continues to exploit their significance today. In Rainbow Bridge to Monument Valley, Thomas J. Harvey artfully tells how Navajos and Anglo-Americans created fabrics of meaning out of this stunning desert landscape, space that western novelist Zane Grey called "the storehouse of unlived years," where a rugged, more authentic life beckoned. Harvey explores the different ways in which the two societies imbued the landscape with deep cultural significance. Navajos long ago incorporated Rainbow Bridge into the complex origin story that embodies their religion and worldview. In the early 1900s, archaeologists crossed paths with Grey in the Rainbow Bridge area. Grey, credited with making the modern western novel popular, sought freedom from the contemporary world and reimagined the landscape for his own purposes. In the process, Harvey shows, Grey erased most of the Navajo inhabitants. This view of the landscape culminated in filmmaker John Ford's use of Monument Valley as the setting for his epic mid-twentieth-century Westerns. Harvey extends the story into the late twentieth century when environmentalists sought to set aside Rainbow Bridge as a symbolic remnant of nature untainted by modernization. Tourists continue to flock to Monument Valley and Rainbow Bridge, as they have for a century, but the landscapes are most familiar today because of their appearances in advertising. Monument Valley has been used to sell perfume, beer, and sport utility vehicles. Encompassing the history of the Navajo, archaeology, literature, film, environmentalism, and tourism, Rainbow Bridge to Monument Valley explores how these rock formations, Navajo sacred spaces still, have become embedded in the modern identity of the American West—and of the nation itself. Thomas J. Harvey is a reporter for the Salt Lake Tribune and co-editor of Imagining the Big Open: Nature, Identity, and Play in the New West. 
Price: 33.20 USD
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188 HASSELSTROM, LINDA M. No Place Like Home: Notes From A Western Life.
University of Nevada Press, Reno: 2010. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
In No Place Like Home, Linda Hasselstrom ponders the changing nature of community in the modern West, where old family ranches are being turned into subdivisions and historic towns are evolving into mean, congested cities. Her scrutiny, like her life, moves back and forth between her ranch on the South Dakota prairie and her house in an old neighborhood at the edge of downtown Cheyenne, Wyoming. The vignettes that form the foundation of her consideration are drawn from the communities she has known during her life in the West, reflecting on how they have grown, thrived, failed, and changed, and highlighting the people and decisions that shaped them. Hasselstrom's ruminations are both intensely personal and universal. She laments the disappearance of the old prairie ranches and the rural sense of community and mutual responsibility that sustained them, but she also discovers that a spirit of community can be found in unlikely places and among unlikely people. The book defines her idea of how a true community should work, and the kind of place she wants to live in. Her voice is unique and honest, both compassionate and cranky, full of love for the harsh, hauntingly beautiful short-grass prairie that is her home, and rich in understanding of the intricacies of the natural world around her and the infinite potentials of human commitment, hope, and greed. For anyone curious about the state of the contemporary West, Hasselstrom offers a report from the front, where nature and human aspirations are often at odds, and where the concepts of community and mutual responsibility are being redefined. Linda Hasselstrom writes, ranches, and conducts writing retreats on the South Dakota ranch homesteaded by her grandfather, a Swedish cobbler, in 1899. She is the author of several books. "Hasselstrom explores the making--and breaking--of community in the American West, a clear-eyed view of those areas identified by most as 'rural'--western towns, farming and ranching communities--and the division between past norms and current trends in the regions she calls home. She writes from the heart of the West, and her story is a compelling, straight-from-the hip rendering of the reality of modern western life. Her message is timely, and it suggests there's hope that the current polemics dividing the West might yet be resolved before all that's good and true is gone." - Judy Blunt, author of Breaking Clean "This is a strong, pulls-no-punches book about what holds us together and drives us apart. It's important reading, no matter where you live." - Story Circle Book Reviews "No Place Like Home is a must for any who want to remember the west as it was." - The Midwest Book Review "Anyone who wants to develop in rural areas should keep Hasselstrom's cautions in mind." - NewWest.Net "Hasselstrom takes stock of what it means to live responsibly upon the land and with others. . . . With her feet firmly planted in the past and her eyes cast appraisingly toward the future, this prairie philosopher considers her personal heritage within the context of the land that sustains her." - Booklist "No Place Like Home promises to be one of Hasselstrom's very best books. She is defining the notion of community in today's American West, and the resulting essays are superb." - Ann Ronald, author of Oh, Give Me a Home: Western Contemplations "An admonishment against living for the moment, it is filled with hard-earned wisdom." - Cowboy Jam Session: Western Culture News & Reviews "No Place Like Home is engaging, thought provoking, and useful--and suggested reading for anyone interested in rural, agricultural, western, or environmental history." - Western Historical Quarterly 
Price: 18.00 USD
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189 HASSRICK, PETER H. Charles M. Russell.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 1999. Volume 15 in Charles M. Russell Center Series on Art and Photography of the American West s Softcover. Brand new book. 
In 1880, Charles M. Russell headed west to Montana, where he worked as a wrangler and chronicled in paint, ink, and watercolor the West and its people. For his splendid depictions of bronco riders, roundups, and everyday ranch life, Russell soon became known as "the Cowboy Artist." Yet this "Cowboy Artist" also spent much time among the Indians and developed a sympathetic understanding of and appreciation for their efforts to preserve their way of life. Russell's memorable paintings and drawings portray a frontier that was vanishing, not only for Indians but also for cowboys. Peter H. Hassrick discusses Russell's work in the context of the artist's experiences in the West and the people who influenced his artistic style. Peter H. Hassrick is Director of the Petrie Instutite of Western American Art, Denver Art Museum, and the author or coauthor of numerous books, including (with Linda Bantel) Forging an American Identity: The Art of William Ranney. 
Price: 33.20 USD
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190 HASSRICK, ROYAL B. Cowboys And Indians: An Illustrated History.
Promontory Press, New York: 1976. Reprint Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 
Examines the American West and the many types who inhabited it and made it what it was. It discusses the history, life and culture of the great American Indian tribes, their battle for survival, and what remains of their civilization. With over 500 illustrations, including contemporary engravings, paintings and early photographs, this is the true story of the American West and the men and women (and animals) who lived there. Includes an Index. 
Price: 22.99 USD
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191 HASSRICK, ROYAL B. History Of Western American Art.
Chartwell Books, Secaucus: 1987. 0785801928 / 9780785801924 First Edition (Unstated). h Hardcover with dustjacket. Fair condition. 
In his magnificently colorful History of Western American Art noted author Royal Hassrick not only retraces in words and pictures the entire evolution of Western American painting from its beginnings to our own day, but makes us realize more vividly than ever before the astonishing unity that underlies so much apparent diversity. This is a book both to ponder and to cherish. Includes an Index. 
Price: 12.49 USD
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192 HAWKE, DAVID FREEMAN. Those Tremendous Mountains: The Story Of The Lewis And Clark Expedition.
W. W. Norton and Company, New York: 1985. 039330289X / 9780393302899 s Softcover. Good condition. 
"Makes clear the scientific value of the expedition without in any way dulling its impact as high and heroic adventure . . . It is an exhilarating story of bravery, self-discipline and firm resolve and Mr. Hawke tells it uncommonly well." - The New Yorker. Includes an Index. 
Price: 10.69 USD
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193 HEDREN, PAUL L. Great Sioux War Orders Of Battle: How The United States Army Waged War On The Northern Plains, 1876-1877.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2011. Volume 31 in the Frontier Military Series. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
A unique resource with a new perspective on the U.S. Army in the Great Sioux War. Lasting nearly two years, the Great Sioux War pitted almost one-third of the U.S. Army against Lakota Sioux and Northern Cheyennes. By the time it ended, this grueling war had played out on twenty-seven different battlefields scattered across five states, resulted in hundreds of casualties, cost millions of dollars, and transformed the landscape and the lives of survivors on both sides. It also entrenched a view of the army as largely inept. In this compelling sourcebook, Paul Hedren uses extensive documentation to demonstrate that the American army adapted quickly to the challenges of fighting this unconventional war and was more effectively led and better equipped than is customarily believed. While it lost at Powder River and at the Little Big Horn, it did not lose the Great Sioux War. In the first part of this volume, Hedren considers concepts of doctrine, training, culture, and matriel to aid understanding of the army's structure and disposition. In part two he dissects the twenty-eight Great Sioux War deployments in chronological order, including documentation of command structures, regiments, and companies employed. In the concluding section, the author addresses how an otherwise sound American army was defeated in two battles and nearly lost a third. The book also features seven helpful appendices, a glossary, and an oversized map showing forts, encampments, and battle sites. By expanding his purview to encompass all of the war's battles—along with troop movements, strategies, and tactics—Hedren offers an authoritative account of the conduct of U.S. forces in a campaign all too frequently misunderstood. Paul L. Hedren is a retired National Park Service superintendent residing in Omaha, Nebraska. He is the author of Fort Laramie and the Great Sioux War and, most recently, We Trailed the Sioux: Enlisted Men Speak on Custer, Crook, and the Great Sioux War. 
Price: 18.95 USD
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194 HINES, SHERMAN (PHOTOGRAPHER); CAMERON, SILVER DONALD (TEXT). Outhouses Of The West.
Firefly Books, Buffalo: 2000. 1552095231 / 9781552095232 First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
A collection of full-color photographs dedicated to preserving for posterity the last specimens of early Western architecture, the little Houses on the Prairie. Captures forever a vanishing fragment of Western heritage both in the United States and Canada. 
Price: 20.47 USD
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195 HINES, SHERMAN (PHOTOGRAPHER); CAMERON, SILVER DONALD (TEXT). Outhouses Of The West.
Nimbus Publishing Limited, Halifax: 1988. 0921054076 / 9780921054078 First Edition (Unstated). h Hardcover with dustjacket. Very good condition. 
A collection of full-color photographs dedicated to preserving for posterity the last specimens of early Western architecture, the little Houses on the Prairie. Captures forever a vanishing fragment of Western heritage both in the United States and Canada. 
Price: 22.42 USD
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196 HOLLIDAY, J. S. The World Rushed In: The California Gold Rush Experience.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2002. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
When The World Rushed In was first published in 1981, the Washington Post predicted, "It seems unlikely that anyone will write a more comprehensive book about the Gold Rush." Twenty years later, no one has emerged to contradict that judgment, and the book has gained recognition as a classic. As the San Francisco Examiner noted, "It is not often that a work of history can be said to supplant every book on the same subject that has gone before it." Through the diary and letters of William Swain--augmented by interpolations from more than five hundred other gold seekers and by letters sent to Swain from his wife and brother back home--the complete cycle of the gold rush is recreated: the overland migration of over thirty thousand men, the struggle to "strike it rich" in the mining camps of the Sierra Nevadas, and the return home through the jungles of the Isthmus of Panama. In a new preface, the author reappraises our continuing fascination with the "gold rush experience" as a defining epoch in western--indeed, American--history. 40 black-and-white Illustrations, 568 pages, 6" x 9". J. S. Holliday is former Executive Director of the California Historical Society and of the Oakland Museum of California and Associate Professor of History at California State University at San Francisco, he is also the author of rush for Riches: Gold Fever & the Making of California. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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197 HOLMES, KENNETH (EDITOR); MIYAMOTO, MELODY M. (INTRODUCTION). Best Of Covered Wagon Women Volume 2: Emigrant Girls On The Overland Trails.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The diaries and letters of women on the overland trails in the mid- to late nineteenth century are treasured documents. These eleven selections drawn from the multivolume Covered Wagon Women series present the best first-person trail accounts penned by women in their teens who traveled west between 1846 and 1898. Ranging in age from eleven to nineteen, unmarried and without children of their own, these diarists had experiences different from those of older women who carried heavier responsibilities with them on the trail. These letters and diaries reflect both the unique perspective of youthful optimism and the experiences common among all female emigrants. The young women write of friendship and family, trail hardships, and explorations such as visits to Indian gravesites. Some like Sallie Hester even write of enjoying the company of men, and many speculate about marriage prospects. Domestic roles did not define the girls' trail experience; only the four oldest in this collection recorded helping with chores. As they journey through Indian lands, these writers show that even their youth did not prevent them from holding notions of white racial superiority. Two of the selections are newly published, having appeared only in limited-distribution collector's editions of the original series. For all readers captivated by the first Best of Covered Wagon Women collection, this new volume's focus on youthful travelers adds a fresh perspective to life on the trail. 
Price: 18.95 USD
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198 HOLMES, KENNETH (EDITOR); TATE, MICHAEL L (INTRODUCTION). Best Of Covered Wagon Women - Volume 1.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The diaries and letters of women who braved the overland trails during the great nineteenth-century westward migration are treasured documents in the study of the American West. These eight firsthand accounts are among the best ever written. They were selected for the power with which they portray the hardship, adventure, and boundless love for friends and family that characterized the overland experience. Some were written with the skilled pens of educated women. Others bear the marks of crude cabin learning, with archaic and imaginative spelling and a simplicity of expression. All convey the profound effect the westward trek had on these women. For too long these diaries and letters were secreted away in attics and basements or collected dust on the shelves of manuscript collections across the country. Their publication gives us a fresh perspective on the pioneer experience. 
Price: 19.90 USD
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199 HOLMES, KENNETH L. (COMPILED & EDITED BY). Covered Wagon Women, Volume 1: Diaries And Letters From The Western Trails, 1840-1849.
University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln and London: 1995. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The women who traveled west in covered wagons during the 1840s speak through these letters and diaries. Here are the voices of Tamsen Donner and young Virginia Reed, members of the ill-fated Donner party; Patty Sessions, the Mormon midwife who delivered five babies on the trail between Omaha and Salt Lake City; Rachel Fisher, who buried both her husband and her little girl before reaching Oregon. Still others make themselves heard, starting out from different places and recording details along the way, from the mundane to the soul-shattering and spirit-lifting. Kenneth L. Holmes was a professor of history at Western Oregon State College. He edited and compiled Covered Wagon Women, drawing on archives and private sources. Anne M. Butler, a professor of history at Utah State University - Logan, is the author of Daughters of Joy, Sisters of Misery: Prostitutes in the American West. "The diaries and letters . . . throb with excitement, pain, and mind-boggling determination."—Kliatt "An outstanding collection of primary sources written by women moving west."—Wagon Tracks "Kenneth L. Holmes made the very wise editorial decision not to update, revise, or parenthetically correct the quirky and often fascinating prose of these nineteenth-century women. . . . The writing is rich with the sounds of common speech and jargon . . . and it should be a gold mine for students of everyday life." — John Mack Faragher, Western Historical Quarterly "Covered Wagon Women is to be valued. . . . First, it brings together in a single edition a major collection of the diaries of overland women. . . . Second, this is probably the most perfectly documented edition a researcher will find."—Lillian Schlissel, Pacific Historical Review 
Price: 18.00 USD
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200 HOMER, MICHAEL W. (EDITOR). On The Way To Somewhere Else: European Sojourners In The Mormon West, 1834-1930,
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2017. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Michael W. Homer has collected the writings of diverse European travelers through Mormon settlements in the American West. Providing a counternarrative to typical accounts of encounters with Mormons in such sojourns, these collected tales include such colorful perspectives on the Mormons as those of an outraged Catholic priest, an intrigued German prince, a liberated French woman, an insightful Italian count, and an embittered Danish apostate. Some of the travelers met with Brigham Young, while others encountered more commonplace figures of the West, including fur traders, Indians, and soldiers. 32 black-and-white Illustrations, Paperback, 452 pages, 6" x 9". Michael W. Homer, a lawyer in Salt Lake City, has published many articles on law and Mormonism. He is the author of Joseph's Temples: The Dynamic Relationship between Freemasonry and Mormonism. 
Price: 24.65 USD
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