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AMERICAN WEST.

AMERICAN WEST.

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21 BARTLETT, RICHARD A. The New Country: A Social History Of The American Frontier 1776-1890.
Oxford University Press, New York: 1974. 0195020219 / 9780195020212 s Softcover. Brand new book. 
From borax mule trains to the canoe stop that was Chicago in the 1830s, this book vividly recreated the tale of the westward movement of pioneers into the heartland of North America. With nearly a century separating historian Richard Bartlett from the end of the movement, Bartlett's broad perspective stresses the continuity and inevitability of this greatest element of America's Golden Age. The book focuses on the settlement of the country, the racial and ethnic composition of the people, agriculture, transportation, developments of the land, the growth of towns and cities, and the nature of frontier society as it brilliantly brings to life the frontier experience as lived by millions of Americans. Bartlett concludes that the pioneer's freedom from restrictions in a new country resulted in the unprecedented burst of energy that settled America in some 114 years. Includes an Index. "A vivid and detailed account of life in the westward sweep between 1776 and 1890."- The Los Angeles Times "With the book's sophisticated concepts of organization and approach, its rewarding details, and its vivid and imaginative writing, it supersedes other social histories of the frontier." - The Journal of Southern History "This is clearly a labor of love by the author, and the respect and admiration he has for his subject is infectious in creating for the reader a small part of the thrill felt by the actual pioneer in going West." - The Journal of American History "Bartlett has an excellent eye and pen for the rich human diversity that made up the westward movement....His book charts the story in a way which recapture the thrill without exaggeration or sentimentality. It combines scholarship with imagination, the prose of the West with its poetry." - The Economist 
Price: 57.00 USD
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22 BERTA-ÁVILA, MARGARITA; TIJERINA-REVILLA, ANITA; LÓPEZ FIGUEROA, JULIE; MUĄOZ JR., CARLOS. Marching Students: Chicana And Chicano Activism In Education, 1968 To The Present.
University of Nevada Press, Reno: 2011. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
In 1968 over 10,000 Chicana/o high school students in East Los Angeles walked out of their schools in the first major protest against racism and educational inequality staged by Mexican Americans in the United States. They ignited the Mexican-American civil rights movement, which opened the doors to higher education and equal opportunity in employment for Mexican Americans and other Latinos previously excluded. Marching Students is a collaborative effort by Chicana/o scholars in several fields to place the 1968 walkouts and Chicana and Chicano Civil Rights Movement in historical context, highlighting the contribution of Chicana/o educators, students, and community activists to minority education. Contributors: Alejandro Covarrubias, Xico Gonzalez, Eracleo Guevara, Adriana Katzew, Lilia R. De Katzew, Rita Kohli, Edward M. Olivos, Alejo Padilla, Carmen E. Quintana, Evelyn M. Rangel-Medina, Marianna Rivera, Daniel G. Solorzano, Carlos Tejeda Margarita Berta-Ávila is associate professor of bilingual/multi-cultural education at the California State University, Sacramento. Anita Tijerina-Revilla is assistant professor of women's studies at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Julie Lopez Figueroa is associate professor of ethnic studies at the California State University, Sacramento. "This book represents an important contribution, in that it attempts to re-engage past struggles within the context of contemporary theories of struggle and resistance." -Antonia Darder, coauthor of Critical Pedagogy Reader: Theory and Practice "This engaging volume's . . . focus on activism distinguishes it from previous studies, as does its use of new theories and topics, such as the relationships between Chicana/o art and student activism and between Black and Latina/o students." -Gilda Ochoa, author of Becoming Neighbors in a Mexican American Community: Power, Conflict, and Solidarity "Marching Students reveals how through transformational resistance and multidimensional consciousness, Chicana and Chicano activists push the limits of what democracy and citizenship means and expand for all of us our very rights as people." -Luis Urrieta Jr., author of Working from Within: Chicana and Chicano Activist Educators in Whitestream Schools 
Price: 33.20 USD
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23 BERTON, PIERRE (WRITTEN AND EDITED BY); NEWFIELD, FRANK (DESIGN); SEARS, BARBARA (PHOTOGRAPHIC RESEARCH). The Klondike Quest: A Photgraphic Essay 1897-1899.
Little, Brown and Company, Boston: 1983. 0316092185 / 9780316092180 First American Edition. An Atlantic Monthly Press Book. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition but the dustjacket has some tears and soiling. 
The Klondike gold rush was perhaps the most photographed event in North America during the nineteenth century. More than ten thousand pictures are available in public archives and private collections, depicting every aspect of what Pierre Berton has called "one of the strangest mass movements in history." For this book, Berton has selected some two hundred photographs, most of them unfamiliar, many never before published. Here, for the first time, is the panoramic drama of the great stampede seen from the point of view of the ordinary gold seeker. A new text, written from a new point of view than Berton's earlier, classic work, The Klondike Fever, together with extended captions, accompanies the photographs. 
Price: 31.02 USD
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24 BIGLER, DAVID L. & BAGLEY, WILL (EDITORS). Innocent Blood: Essential Narratives Of The Mountain Meadows Massacre.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2008. Volume 12 in Kingdom in the West: The Mormons and the American Frontier. h Hardcover. Brand new book. 
The slaughter of a wagon train of some 120 people in southern Utah on September 11, 1857, has long been the subject of controversy and debate. Innocent Blood gathers key primary sources describing the tangled story of the Mountain Meadows massacre. This wide array of contrasting perspectives, many never before published, provide a powerful and intimate picture of this "dastardly outrage" and its cover-up. A fine addition to the Kingdom in the West Series. The documents David L. Bigler and Will Bagley have collected offer a clearer understanding of the victims, the perpetrators, and the reasons a frontier American theocracy sought to justify or conceal the participants' guilt. These narratives make clear that, despite limited Southern Paiute involvement, white men planned the killing and their church's highest leaders encouraged Mormon settlers to undertake the deed. This compelling documentary record presents the primary evidence that tells the story from its contradictory perspectives. The sources let readers evaluate and track the evolution of such myths as the Paiutes' guilt, the emigrants' provocation of their murderers, Brigham Young's ignorance of what happened, and John D. Lee's sole culpability. Clearly revealed is the part Utah authorities took in blocking the investigation until it became expedient to sacrifice Lee. Together, these narratives show how the massacre's story has been continually distorted and then revealed over 150 years—and how the obfuscation and cover-up continue. Innocent Blood conveys the encompassing impact the atrocity had on people's lives, then and for generations after. It is a valuable sourcebook sure to prove indispensable to future research. Independent historian David L. Bigler is a Utah native, a veteran of World War II and the Korean War, and a University of Utah graduate in journalism. He received an honorary doctor of letters degree from Southern Utah State College at Cedar City, now Southern Utah University. He retired as director of public affairs for U.S. Steel in 1986 to devote full time to Mormon and western history. He is a fellow and an honorary life member, Utah State Historical Society; a former director, Utah State Board of History and Friends of University of Utah Libraries; and past president, Oregon-California Trails Association. His books and articles have won awards from the Utah State Historical Society, Westerners International and The Mormon History Association. His books include The Gold Discovery Journal of Azariah Smith, University of Utah Press, 1990; Forgotten Kingdom: The Mormon Theocracy in the American West, 1847-1896, Arthur H. Clark, 1998; Army of Israel: Mormon Battalion Narratives, with Will Bagley, Arthur H. Clark, 2000; A Winter with the Mormons: The 1852 Letters of Jotham Goodell, Marriott Library, University of Utah, 2001; Fort Limhi: The Mormon Adventure in Oregon Territory, 1855-1857, Arthur H. Clark, 2003; and, with Will Bagley, Innocent Blood: Essential Narratives of the Mountain Meadows Massacre, Arthur H. Clark, 2008. He and his wife, Evah, reside in Roseville, California. Will Bagley is an independent historian who has written about overland emigration, frontier violence, railroads, mining, and the Mormons. Bagley has published extensively over the years and is the author and editor of many books, articles, and reviews in professional journals. Bagley is the series editor of Arthur H. Clark Company's documentary history series, KINGDOM IN THE WEST: The Mormons and the American Frontier. Bagley has been a Wallace Stegner Centennial Fellow at the University of Utah and the Archibald Hannah, Jr. Fellow in American History at Yale University's Beinecke Library. Blood of the Prophets: Brigham Young and the Massacre at Mountain Meadows has won numerous awards including a Spur Award from Western Writers of America, the Bancroft History Prize from the Denver Public Library, Westerners International Best Book, and the Western History Association Caughey Book Prize for the most distinguished book on the history of the American West. So Rugged and Mountainous: Blazing the Trails to Oregon and California, 1812-1848 is the first of four volumes of "Overland West: The Story of the Oregon and California Trails". 
Price: 43.70 USD
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25 BIGLER, DAVID L. & BAGLEY, WILL. The Mormon Rebellion: America's First Civil War, 1857-1858.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2011. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
America's first civil war played out in the Far West. In 1857 President James Buchanan ordered U.S. troops to Utah to replace Brigham Young as governor and restore order in what the federal government viewed as a territory in rebellion. In this compelling narrative, award-winning authors David L. Bigler and Will Bagley use long-suppressed sources to show that—contrary to common perception—the Mormon rebellion was not the result of Buchanan's "blunder," nor was it a David-and-Goliath tale in which an abused religious minority heroically defied the imperial ambitions of an unjust and tyrannical government. They argue that Mormon leaders had their own far-reaching ambitions and fully intended to establish an independent nation—the Kingdom of God—in the West. Long overshadowed by the Civil War, the tragic story of this conflict involved a tense and protracted clash pitting Brigham Young's Nauvoo Legion against Colonel Albert Sidney Johnston and the U.S. Army's Utah Expedition. In the end, the conflict between the two armies saw no pitched battles, but in the authors' view, Buchanan's decision to order troops to Utah, his so-called blunder, eventually proved decisive and beneficial for both Mormons and the American republic. A rich exploration of events and forces that presaged the Civil War, The Mormon Rebellion broadens our understanding of both antebellum America and Utah's frontier theocracy and offers a challenging reinterpretation of a controversial chapter in Mormon annals. Independent historian David L. Bigler is a Utah native, a veteran of World War II and the Korean War, and a University of Utah graduate in journalism. He received an honorary doctor of letters degree from Southern Utah State College at Cedar City, now Southern Utah University. He retired as director of public affairs for U.S. Steel in 1986 to devote full time to Mormon and western history. He is a fellow and an honorary life member, Utah State Historical Society; a former director, Utah State Board of History and Friends of University of Utah Libraries; and past president, Oregon-California Trails Association. His books and articles have won awards from the Utah State Historical Society, Westerners International and The Mormon History Association. His books include The Gold Discovery Journal of Azariah Smith, University of Utah Press, 1990; Forgotten Kingdom: The Mormon Theocracy in the American West, 1847-1896, Arthur H. Clark, 1998; Army of Israel: Mormon Battalion Narratives, with Will Bagley, Arthur H. Clark, 2000; A Winter with the Mormons: The 1852 Letters of Jotham Goodell, Marriott Library, University of Utah, 2001; Fort Limhi: The Mormon Adventure in Oregon Territory, 1855-1857, Arthur H. Clark, 2003; and, with Will Bagley, Innocent Blood: Essential Narratives of the Mountain Meadows Massacre, Arthur H. Clark, 2008. He and his wife, Evah, reside in Roseville, California. Will Bagley is an independent historian who has written about overland emigration, frontier violence, railroads, mining, and the Mormons. Bagley has published extensively over the years and is the author and editor of many books, articles, and reviews in professional journals. Bagley is the series editor of Arthur H. Clark Company's documentary history series, KINGDOM IN THE WEST: The Mormons and the American Frontier. Bagley has been a Wallace Stegner Centennial Fellow at the University of Utah and the Archibald Hannah, Jr. Fellow in American History at Yale University's Beinecke Library. Blood of the Prophets: Brigham Young and the Massacre at Mountain Meadows has won numerous awards including a Spur Award from Western Writers of America, the Bancroft History Prize from the Denver Public Library, Westerners International Best Book, and the Western History Association Caughey Book Prize for the most distinguished book on the history of the American West. So Rugged and Mountainous: Blazing the Trails to Oregon and California, 1812-1848 is the first of four volumes of Overland West: The Story of the Oregon and California Trails. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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26 BLEW, MARY CLEARMAN. Writing Her Own Life: Imogene Welch, Western Rural Schoolteacher.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: . h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Mary Clearman Blew's aunt Imogene Welch embodied the hard-working values of depression-era western America. In Writing Her Own Life, Blew builds a narrative around excerpts from the diaries Imogene kept during World War II while she taught in rural Montana schools and later in Washington State. Through her diary entries we learn of the war's effects on Imogene as she moved from rural, family-centered life in Montana to independent if somewhat lonelier life in Washington State. After growing up on an impoverished homestead in Montana, Imogene enjoyed the modest comforts of living in a small town in Washington, including electricity and running water. And she experienced the dramatic changes in a school system under stress from the war: separated families, crowded classrooms, and an increasingly mobile population. Imogene's diaries find her exploring a new landscape, worrying about distant friends and family, coping with her newfangled automobile, enduring roommates, and eventually learning to cherish her independence. Blew explores the transitional experiences of the young schoolteacher and examines traditional and non-traditional ways in which fiction and creative nonfiction recreate the life recorded in the diaries. Moving beyond Imogene's experiences, Blew asks what an inheritance of family stories and text means to a generation of readers who are experiencing transitions different from Imogene's but no less intense. Mary Clearman Blew is Professor of English and Creative Writing at the University of Idaho, Moscow. She is the author of Bone Deep in Landscape, Balsamroot: A Memoir, Lambing Out And Other Stories (University of Oklahoma Press) and Sister Coyote: Montana Stories and is coeditor of Circle of Women: An Anthology of Contemporary Western Women's Writing. 
Price: 29.40 USD
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27 BLOOMFIELD, SUSANNE GEORGE & REED, ERIC MELVIN. Adventures In The West: Stories For Young Readers.
University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln: 2007. 0803259743 / 9780803259744 First Edition (Unstated). s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Before MP3 players, DVDs, and video games, before even TV and radio, American children entertained themselves by reading. Often what they read were popular magazines aimed at the whole family; a weekly newspaper such as The Youth's Companion or a monthly magazine like St. Nicholas were about all a turn-of-the-century family could afford. But what these publications afforded was invaluable, and it is this education in imagination and American life that Adventures in the West revisits. Adventures in the West brings together twenty-six stories from The Youth's Companion and St. Nicholas to offer a unique perspective on the values of the time. The stories also reveal the common myths, attitudes, and prejudices of life on the western frontier, reflected in the lessons these publications imparted to a young audience. To enhance the reader's understanding, the editors have added historical and cultural background for each story. Some of the best writers of the time, including L. Frank Baum, Hamlin Garland, and Mary Austin, write of a West that mirrors American history and the values the authors sought to promote. Filled with the exploits of cowpunchers, pioneers, courageous Indians, and plucky animals, these riveting stories also embody the beliefs and experiences of an era and tell more than one story of their day. Susanne George Bloomfield is Distinguished Martin Professor of English at the University of Nebraska at Kearney. Eric Melvin Reed is a graduate assistant in English at the University of Nebraska at Kearney. "These are stories about cowboys, Indians, animals, pioneer families, and boys and girls. They reflect the time in which they were written, but their underlying lessons of decency and morality are just as valued today. . . . This is a fine addition to Western Americana fiction collections and will be useful to literature and history teachers."—School Library Journal "The stories do more than relate interesting tales. They are windows to the world west of the Mississippi as it transformed from wilderness to a land of farms and cities, from the preserve of Indians to a land claimed mostly by white settlers. . . . [Readers] will appreciate these stories for their adventures, pioneer spirit and colorful characters."—Omaha World-Herald "[T]he stories are uplifting and teach the value of honesty, pluck, hard work, and true grit."—KLIATT "The various writing styles and authenticity of subject matter make these stories an excellent way to introduce students to American West culture."—True West 
Price: 18.72 USD
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28 BONFIELD, LYNN A. (EDITOR & COMMENTARY). New England To Gold Rush California: The Journal Of Alfred And Chastina W. Rix, 1849-1854.
The Arthur H. Clark Company, Norman: 2011. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
A unique husband-and-wife journal chronicles life during the gold rush era On July 29, 1849, after an eight-year courtship, two young schoolteachers were married in a small town in northern Vermont. Their story could easily have been lost to history, except that Alfred and Chastina Rix had the foresight to begin recording their observations in a joint journal. Their unique husband-and-wife account, which captures the turbulence of life and events during the gold rush era, is also a personal—and compelling—chronicle of a singular family's separation and reunion. When the Rixes began their journal, abolition, temperance, and the westward movement dominated New England culture and politics. Stricken with "gold fever," Alfred headed to California, while Chastina stayed behind. Alone with their young son in Vermont, Chastina continued the journal, describing her loneliness and fatigue as she labored to maintain the household, and summarizing Alfred's frequent letters. After establishing himself economically in San Francisco, Alfred urged his wife to join him. Chastina and their two-year-old son traveled by ship, via Panama, to California, where the couple resumed their journal, continuing the pattern of alternating entries and detailing life in the burgeoning city. Alfred's concluding notes at the end of the journal are an abrupt reminder that, just as now, life in the middle of the nineteenth century could bring unexpected and personal tragedy. In her careful editing of the journal, Lynn A. Bonfield has preserved its original spelling and punctuation while enriching the story with photographs and insightful annotations. Her lively chapter introductions place the journal in the context of both New England and California history and culture. Lynn A. Bonfield is retired director of the Labor Archives and Research Center at San Francisco State University. She is coauthor of Roxana's Children: The Biography of a Nineteenth-Century Vermont Family, among other publications. 
Price: 42.75 USD
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29 BOTTOMS, D MICHAEL. An Aristocracy Of Color: Race And Reconstruction In Caifornia And The West, 1850-1890.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2013. Volume 5 in Race and Culture in the American West . h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
In the South after the Civil War, the reassertion of white supremacy tended to pit white against black. In the West, by contrast, a radically different drama emerged, particularly in multiracial, multiethnic California. State elections in California to ratify Reconstruction-era amendments to the U.S. Constitution raised the question of whether extending suffrage to black Californians might also lead to the political participation of thousands of Chinese immigrants. As historian D. Michael Bottoms shows in An Aristocracy of Color, many white Californians saw in this and other Reconstruction legislation a threat to the fragile racial hierarchy they had imposed on the state's legal system during the 1850s. But nonwhite Californians—blacks and Chinese in particular—recognized an unprecedented opportunity to reshape the state's race relations. Drawing on court records, political debates, and eyewitness accounts, Bottoms brings to life the monumental battle that followed. Bottoms begins by analyzing white Californians' mid-century efforts to prohibit nonwhite testimony against whites in court. Challenges to these laws by blacks and Chinese during Reconstruction followed a trajectory that would be repeated in later contests. Each minority challenged the others for higher status in court, at the polls, in education, and elsewhere, employing stereotypes and ideas of racial difference popular among whites to argue for its own rightful place in "civilized" society. Whites contributed to the melee by occasionally yielding to blacks in order to keep the Chinese and California Indians at a disadvantage. These dynamics reverberated in other state legal systems throughout the West in the mid- to late 1800s and nationwide in the twentieth century. As An Aristocracy of Color reveals, Reconstruction outside of the South briefly promised an opportunity for broader equality but in the end strengthened and preserved the racial hierarchy that favored whites. D. Michael Bottoms studies race and law in the nineteenth-century American West. He is currently visiting Assistant Professor of History at Whitman College. "Bottoms brings exploration of Reconstruction and changing attitudes about race westward. . . . This is a highly interesting story, and Bottoms tells it well." —Elliott West, author of The Essential West: Collected Essays 
Price: 25.60 USD
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30 BOTTOMS, D MICHAEL. An Aristocracy Of Color: Race And Reconstruction In Caifornia And The West, 1850-1890.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2013. Volume 5 in Race and Culture in the American West . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
In the South after the Civil War, the reassertion of white supremacy tended to pit white against black. In the West, by contrast, a radically different drama emerged, particularly in multiracial, multiethnic California. State elections in California to ratify Reconstruction-era amendments to the U.S. Constitution raised the question of whether extending suffrage to black Californians might also lead to the political participation of thousands of Chinese immigrants. As historian D. Michael Bottoms shows in An Aristocracy of Color, many white Californians saw in this and other Reconstruction legislation a threat to the fragile racial hierarchy they had imposed on the state's legal system during the 1850s. But nonwhite Californians—blacks and Chinese in particular—recognized an unprecedented opportunity to reshape the state's race relations. Drawing on court records, political debates, and eyewitness accounts, Bottoms brings to life the monumental battle that followed. Bottoms begins by analyzing white Californians' mid-century efforts to prohibit nonwhite testimony against whites in court. Challenges to these laws by blacks and Chinese during Reconstruction followed a trajectory that would be repeated in later contests. Each minority challenged the others for higher status in court, at the polls, in education, and elsewhere, employing stereotypes and ideas of racial difference popular among whites to argue for its own rightful place in "civilized" society. Whites contributed to the melee by occasionally yielding to blacks in order to keep the Chinese and California Indians at a disadvantage. These dynamics reverberated in other state legal systems throughout the West in the mid- to late 1800s and nationwide in the twentieth century. As An Aristocracy of Color reveals, Reconstruction outside of the South briefly promised an opportunity for broader equality but in the end strengthened and preserved the racial hierarchy that favored whites. D. Michael Bottoms studies race and law in the nineteenth-century American West. He is currently visiting Assistant Professor of History at Whitman College. "Bottoms brings exploration of Reconstruction and changing attitudes about race westward. . . . This is a highly interesting story, and Bottoms tells it well." —Elliott West, author of The Essential West: Collected Essays 
Price: 18.95 USD
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31 BRADY, CYRUS TOWNSEND; KING, JAMES T. (INTRODUCTION). Indian Fights And Fighters.
University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln: 1971. 0803257430 / 9780803257436 Reprint Edition. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Originally published in 1904, Indian Fights and Fighters regularly appears in bibliographies of significant works on the history of the American West. Embracing almost three decades of Plains history, it contains not only Brady's clear, fast-paced accounts of the Plains wars, but also a number of eyewitness accounts, most of which were written especially for him and which are almost impossible to find elsewhere. The Powder River Expedition, the tragedy at Fort Phil Kearny, the Wagon Box Fight, the defense of Beecher's Island, the Fetterman Massacre, the battles of Washita and Summit Springs, and the campaigns of Crook, Custer, and Miles against the Sioux all are fully treated. The introduction by James T. King sketches Brady's career and evaluates his sources. Includes an Index. 
Price: 20.66 USD
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32 BRAND, MAX; GREY, ZANE; HARTE, BRET; O. HENRY; LONDON, JACK ; SCHAEFER, JACK. The Best Western Stories: 22 Stories.
Mallard Press, New York: 1990. 0792452488 / 9780792452485 Reprint Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Very good condition. 
The true flavor of the the American "Wild West" is brought alive in this collection of over 20 dashing and adventurous cowboy tales from the world's greatest Western writers. 
Price: 13.25 USD
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33 BREEDON, ROBERT (EDITOR). Trails West.
National Geographic, Washington, DC: 1979. First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 
Sense the excitement rippling through a caravan setting out from Independence, Missouri, for distant, foreign Santa Fe. You will stand in ruts worn deep in sandstone by iron-clad wheels endlessly turning toward Oregon or California. You will trudge with tireless Mormons, sternly disciplined in their religious zeal, to their promised land. Contains more than 130 color photographs, many evoking the then wilderness that greeted early settlers. 59 historical illustrations provide a vivid picture of frontier life. Includes an Index. 
Price: 6.18 USD
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34 BREEDON, ROBERT L. (EDITOR). Trails West.
National Geographic, Washington, DC: 1979. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 
Sense the excitement rippling through a caravan setting out from Independence, Missouri, for distant, foreign Santa Fe. You will stand in ruts worn deep in sandstone by iron-clad wheels endlessly turning toward Oregon or California. You will trudge with tireless Mormons, sternly disciplined in their religious zeal, to their promised land. Contains more than 130 color photographs, many evoking the then wilderness that greeted early settlers. 59 historical illustrations provide a vivid picture of frontier life. Includes an Index. 
Price: 6.65 USD
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35 BRIDGES, AMY. Democratic Beginnings: Founding The Western States.
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: 2017. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
State constitutions are blueprints for government institutions, declarations of collective identity, statements of principle, values, and goals. It naturally follows, and this book demonstrates, that the founding documents and the conventions that produced them reflect the emerging dynamics of American democracy in the nineteenth century. Nowhere is this more clear, Amy Bridges tells us in Democratic Beginnings, than in the American West. A close study of the constitutional conventions that founded eleven Western states, and of the constitutions they wrote, Democratic Beginnings traces the arc of Western development. Spanning the sixty years from California's constitution of 1850 to those of Arizona and New Mexico in 1910—and including Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, and Wyoming—Bridges shows how delegates to these states' constitutional conventions, pragmatically and creatively devised law and policy for the unprecedented challenges they faced. Far from the "island communities" of conventional 19th-century American history, these delegates, and the territories they represented, were thoroughly engaged in the central issues of their times, at the local, regional, and national levels—mining and agriculture, labor law and corporate responsibilities, water rights and government obligations, education and judicial practice. Theirs was not the Founders' constitutional convention. With very different tasks, delegates more representative of the population, and the experience of living in a democratic republic that their forebears lacked, the Western delegates found unparalleled opportunities at the conventions for popular input into law and public policy. What they did with these opportunities, and how these in turn shaped the emerging American West, is the story Democratic Beginnings tells. Amy Bridges is professor of political science and adjunct professor of history at University of California San Diego. She is the author of Morning Glories: Municipal Reform in the Southwest and A City in the Republic: Antebellum New York and the Origins of Machine Politics, 18281863. "Innovative and highly engaging. The explication of the [western] state constitutional convention delegates' diligence and statesmanship is of great importance to future studies of federalism and American political development. Highly recommended." —Choice "Amy Bridges's account of deliberations in western state constitutional conventions enriches our understanding of constitutionalism and American political development. Democratic Beginnings shows that late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century founders of western constitutions not only approached their task in a different fashion than framers of the federal constitution but also differed from earlier generations of state constitution-makers, on account of the distinct problems of governance they encountered and their readiness to adopt innovative provisions in response to these challenges."—John Dinan, author of Keeping the People's Liberties: Legislators, Citizens, and Judges as Guardians of Rights 
Price: 25.60 USD
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36 BROKAW, DENNIS (COLOR PHOTOGRAPHS); MARX, WESLEY (HUMAN AND NATURAL HISTORY NY). The Pacific Shore: Meeting Place Of Man And Nature.
E. P. Dutton and Co., New York: 1974. 0525174389 / 9780525174387 First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Reading copy. 
Wesley Mark's informative and sensitive prose steeps the reader in the Pacific terrain: its history, geography, the rich variety of its plant and animal associations and, most crucial, its future in a society that seems to favor parking lost over forests and land prices over natural beauty. In a stunning 48-page gallery of four-color pictures that reveals the visual excitement of the sea-bitten coast, Dennis Brokaw - already recognized as one of America's outstanding color photographers - allows us to appreciate the life that still thrives in backwashes and rocky coves, and in the magnificent terrain spanning thousands of miles and eons of the earth's history. Includes an Index. 
Price: 8.50 USD
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37 BROOKS, JUANITA; SHIPPS, JAN (FOREWORD). The Mountain Meadows Massacre.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 1991. 0806123184 / 9780806123189 s Softcover. Brand new book. 
In the Fall of 1857, some 120 California-bound emigrants were killed in lonely Mountain Meadows in southern Utah; only eighteen young children were spared. The men on the ground after the bloody deed took an oath that they would never mention the event again, either in public or in private. The leaders of the Mormon church also counseled silence. The first report, soon after the massacre, described it as an Indian onslaught at which a few white men were present, only one of whom, John D. Lee, was actually named. With admirable scholarship, Mrs. Brooks has traced the background of conflict, analyzed the emotional climate at the time, pointed up the social and military organization in Utah, and revealed the forces which culminated in the great tragedy at Mountain Meadows. The result is a near-classic treatment which neither smears nor clears the participants as individuals. It portrays an atmosphere of war hysteria, whipped up by recitals of past persecutions and the vision of an approaching "army" coming to drive the Mormons from their homes. 
Price: 19.90 USD
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38 BROSNAN, KATHLEEN A.; SCOTT, AMY L. City Dreams, Country Schemes: Community And Identity In The American West.
University of Nevada Press, Reno: 2011. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The American West, from the beginning of Euro-American settlement, has been shaped by diverse ideas about how to utilize physical space and natural environments to create cohesive, sometimes exclusive community identities. When westerners developed their towns, they constructed spaces and cultural identities that reflected alternative understandings of modern urbanity. The essays in City Dreams, Country Schemes utilize an interdisciplinary approach to explore the ways that westerners conceptualized, built, and inhabited urban, suburban, and exurban spaces in the twentieth century. The contributors examine such topics as the attractions of open space and rural gentrification in shaping urban development; the role of tourism in developing national parks, historical sites, and California's Napa Valley; and the roles of public art, gender, and ethnicity in shaping urban centers. City Dreams, Country Schemes reveals the values and expectations that have shaped the West and the lives of the people who inhabit it. Kathleen A. Brosnan is associate dean for faculty and research in the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Houston. Amy L. Scott is assistant professor of history at Bradley University. "These essays have much to teach us about some of the dramatic changes that have transformed the American West over the past decades." -Char Miller, editor of Cities and Nature in the American West "An extraordinary collection of engaging and innovative essays that explores how developers, city planners, civic boosters, "cultural elites" and ordinary residents reimagined the city in the trans-Mississippi United States, this volume should quickly join the required reading lists of any serious urban studies program. -Southwestern Historical Quarterly, October 2012, vol. 116, no. 2 "City Dreams, Country Schemes excels in offering readers thoughtful perspectives on how westerners have imagined themselves and the landscapes they have lived in. . . . Attending carefully to the intersection of nature and culture, [it] succeeds in its effort to broaden and deepen our understanding of community and identity in the modern West." New Mexico Historical Review, Summer 2013 
Price: 47.45 USD
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39 BROWN, DEE. The Gentle Tamers: Women Of The Old Wild West.
University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln: 1981. 0803250258 / 9780803250253 Reprint Edition. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
All aspects of western feminine life, which include a good deal about the western male, are covered in this lively, informal but soundly factual account of the women who built the West. Among those whose stories are included are Elizabeth Custer; Lola Montez, Ann Eliza Young, Josephine Meeker, Carry Nation, Esther Morris, and Virginia Reed. Dee Brown is author of numerous books including Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, The Fetterman Massacre and The Galvanized Yankees. "The promise implicit in the title of this book is not broken. Mr. Brown has assembled a notable collection of women who took part in the migrations westward, mostly in the period of 1850-1880, and presents them, often with enthusiasm and always with sympathy. . . . I thoroughly enjoyed Mr. Brown's book."—Stewart Holbrook, New York Herald Tribune Books "Underlying the book's fascinating comedy and pathos and terror, there is a sociological overtone. Mr. Brown shows that the reactions of these women to their frontier experience were as important as male reactions in the development of American mores and American democracy."—Marshall Sprague, New York Times Book Review 
Price: 15.63 USD
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40 BROWN, DEE. Wondrous Times On The Frontier.
August House Publishers, Inc., Little Rock: 1991. 0874831377 / 9780874831375 First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Very good condition. 
Draws on more than fifty years of research in the good-humored social history of the American frontier. In a work rich in anecdotes about pioneers, women, lawmen, outlaws, newspapermen, schoolteachers, cowboys, tenerfeet, preachers, and native Americans, Brown portrays the diversity of the frontier experience. Includes an Index. 
Price: 10.17 USD
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