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AMERICAN WEST.

AMERICAN WEST.

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281 MCMANUS, SHEILA. The Line Which Separates: Race, Gender, And The Making Of The Alberta - Montana Borderlands.
University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln: 2005. Race and Ethnicity in the American West Series. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Nations are made and unmade at their borders, and the forty-ninth parallel separating Montana and Alberta in the late nineteenth century was a pivotal Western site for both the United States and Canada. Blackfoot country was a key site of Canadian and American efforts to shape their nations and national identities. The region's landscape, aboriginal people, newcomers, railroads, and ongoing cross-border ties all challenged the governments' efforts to create, colonize, and nationalize the Alberta-Montana borderlands. The Line Which Separates makes an important and useful comparison between American and Canadian government policies and attitudes regarding race, gender, and homesteading. Federal visions of the West in general and the borderlands in particular rested on overlapping sets of assumptions about space, race, and gender; those same assumptions would be used to craft the policies that were supposed to turn national visions into local realities. The growth of a white female population in the region, which should have "whitened" and "easternized" the region, merely served to complicate emerging categories. Both governments worked hard to enforce the lines that were supposed to separate "good" land from "bad," whites from aboriginals, different groups of newcomers from each other, and women's roles from men's roles. The lines and categories they depended on were used to distinguish each West, and thus each nation, from the other. Drawing on a range of sources, from government maps and reports to oral testimony and personal papers, The Line Which Separates explores the uneven way in which the borderlands were superimposed on Blackfoot country in order to divide a previously cohesive region in the late nineteenth century. Sheila McManus is an assistant professor of history at University of Lethbridge in Alberta, Canada. "McManus has written a concise, important, satisfying contribution to an emerging literature that looks freshly at borderlands and how they have come into being — and how in some ways they are still not there." — Elliott West, The American Review of Canadian Studies "The Line Which Separates is a fine history of an understudied area and a reminder in tumultuous times of the difficult physical and imaginative work that goes into nation building." — Mary Murphy, Western Historical Quarterly "The Line Which Separates is a major contribution to the growing field of northern borderlands history because [Sheila McManus] carefully dissects precisely how American and Canadian approaches to their respective Wests differed. This book is thus a welcome, readable addition to the literature and clearly shows that our 'other border' is also worthy of serious study."—Great Plains Quarterly "McManus adds considerably to a growing literature emphasizing the complexity of creating national boundaries. The book is insightful and the research impressive."—Journal of the West 
Price: 66.45 USD
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282 MCMANUS, SHEILA. The Line Which Separates: Race, Gender, And The Making Of The Alberta - Montana Borderlands.
University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln: 2005. Race and Ethnicity in the American West Series. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Nations are made and unmade at their borders, and the forty-ninth parallel separating Montana and Alberta in the late nineteenth century was a pivotal Western site for both the United States and Canada. Blackfoot country was a key site of Canadian and American efforts to shape their nations and national identities. The region's landscape, aboriginal people, newcomers, railroads, and ongoing cross-border ties all challenged the governments' efforts to create, colonize, and nationalize the Alberta-Montana borderlands. The Line Which Separates makes an important and useful comparison between American and Canadian government policies and attitudes regarding race, gender, and homesteading. Federal visions of the West in general and the borderlands in particular rested on overlapping sets of assumptions about space, race, and gender; those same assumptions would be used to craft the policies that were supposed to turn national visions into local realities. The growth of a white female population in the region, which should have "whitened" and "easternized" the region, merely served to complicate emerging categories. Both governments worked hard to enforce the lines that were supposed to separate "good" land from "bad," whites from aboriginals, different groups of newcomers from each other, and women's roles from men's roles. The lines and categories they depended on were used to distinguish each West, and thus each nation, from the other. Drawing on a range of sources, from government maps and reports to oral testimony and personal papers, The Line Which Separates explores the uneven way in which the borderlands were superimposed on Blackfoot country in order to divide a previously cohesive region in the late nineteenth century. Sheila McManus is an assistant professor of history at University of Lethbridge in Alberta, Canada. "McManus has written a concise, important, satisfying contribution to an emerging literature that looks freshly at borderlands and how they have come into being — and how in some ways they are still not there." — Elliott West, The American Review of Canadian Studies "The Line Which Separates is a fine history of an understudied area and a reminder in tumultuous times of the difficult physical and imaginative work that goes into nation building." — Mary Murphy, Western Historical Quarterly "The Line Which Separates is a major contribution to the growing field of northern borderlands history because [Sheila McManus] carefully dissects precisely how American and Canadian approaches to their respective Wests differed. This book is thus a welcome, readable addition to the literature and clearly shows that our 'other border' is also worthy of serious study."—Great Plains Quarterly "McManus adds considerably to a growing literature emphasizing the complexity of creating national boundaries. The book is insightful and the research impressive."—Journal of the West 
Price: 28.45 USD
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283 MIFFLIN, MARGOT. The Blue Tattoo: The Life Of Olive Oatman.
University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln: 2011. Women in the West Series h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
In 1851 Olive Oatman was a thirteen-year old pioneer traveling west toward Zion, with her Mormon family. Within a decade, she was a white Indian with a chin tattoo, caught between cultures. The Blue Tattoo tells the harrowing story of this forgotten heroine of frontier America. Orphaned when her family was brutally killed by Yavapai Indians, Oatman lived as a slave to her captors for a year before being traded to the Mohave, who tattooed her face and raised her as their own. She was fully assimilated and perfectly happy when, at nineteen, she was ransomed back to white society. She became an instant celebrity, but the price of fame was high and the pain of her ruptured childhood lasted a lifetime. Based on historical records, including letters and diaries of Oatman's friends and relatives, The Blue Tattoo is the first book to examine her life from her childhood in Illinois—including the massacre, her captivity, and her return to white society—to her later years as a wealthy banker's wife in Texas. Oatman's story has since become legend, inspiring artworks, fiction, film, radio plays, and even an episode of Death Valley Days starring Ronald Reagan. Its themes, from the perils of religious utopianism to the permeable border between civilization and savagery, are deeply rooted in the American psyche. Oatman's blue tattoo was a cultural symbol that evoked both the imprint of her Mohave past and the lingering scars of westward expansion. It also served as a reminder of her deepest secret, fully explored here for the first time: she never wanted to go home. 31 photographs, 1 map. Margot Mifflin is an author and journalist who writes about women, art, and contemporary culture. The author of Bodies of Subversion: A Secret History of Women and Tattoo, she has written for many publications, including the New York Times, the New Yorker, Entertainment Weekly, the Believer, and Salon.com. Mifflin is an assistant professor in the English Department of Lehman College of the City University of New York (CUNY) and directs the Arts and Culture program at CUNY's Graduate School of Journalism, where she also teaches. "The Blue Tattoo is well-researched history that reads like unbelievable fiction, telling the story of Olive Oatman, the first tattooed American white woman. . . . Mifflin weaves together Olive's story with the history of American westward expansion, the Mohave, tattooing in America, and captivity literature in the 1800s."—Elizabeth Quinn, Bust "In The Blue Tattoo, Margot Mifflin slices away the decades of mythology and puts the story in its proper historical context. What emerges is a riveting, well-researched portrait of a young woman—a survivor, but someone marked for life by the experience."—Jon Shumaker, Tucson Weekly "Although Oatman's story on its own is full of intrigue, Mifflin adeptly uses her tale as a springboard for larger issues of the time."—Feminist Review "The Blue Tattoo is well written and well researched; it re-opens the story of white women and men going West and Native people trying to survive these travels."—June Namias, Pacific Historical Review "Mifflin's treatment of Olive's sojourns [provides] an excellent teaching opportunity about America's ongoing captivation with ethnic/gender crossings."—Western American Literature "Mifflin engagingly describes Oatman's ordeal and theorizes about its impact on Oatman herself as well as on popular imagination…. Her book adds nuance to Oatman's story and also humanizes the Mohave who adopted her. Recommended for general readers as well as students and scholars."—Library Journal Southwest Books of the Year, 2009 -- Top Pick Finalist for the 2010 Caroline Bancroft History Prize 2014 One Book Yuma Selection 
Price: 23.70 USD
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284 MIFFLIN, MARGOT. The Blue Tattoo: The Life Of Olive Oatman.
University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln: 2011. Women in the West Series s Softcover. Brand new book. 
In 1851 Olive Oatman was a thirteen-year old pioneer traveling west toward Zion, with her Mormon family. Within a decade, she was a white Indian with a chin tattoo, caught between cultures. The Blue Tattoo tells the harrowing story of this forgotten heroine of frontier America. Orphaned when her family was brutally killed by Yavapai Indians, Oatman lived as a slave to her captors for a year before being traded to the Mohave, who tattooed her face and raised her as their own. She was fully assimilated and perfectly happy when, at nineteen, she was ransomed back to white society. She became an instant celebrity, but the price of fame was high and the pain of her ruptured childhood lasted a lifetime. Based on historical records, including letters and diaries of Oatman's friends and relatives, The Blue Tattoo is the first book to examine her life from her childhood in Illinois—including the massacre, her captivity, and her return to white society—to her later years as a wealthy banker's wife in Texas. Oatman's story has since become legend, inspiring artworks, fiction, film, radio plays, and even an episode of Death Valley Days starring Ronald Reagan. Its themes, from the perils of religious utopianism to the permeable border between civilization and savagery, are deeply rooted in the American psyche. Oatman's blue tattoo was a cultural symbol that evoked both the imprint of her Mohave past and the lingering scars of westward expansion. It also served as a reminder of her deepest secret, fully explored here for the first time: she never wanted to go home. 31 photographs, 1 map. Margot Mifflin is an author and journalist who writes about women, art, and contemporary culture. The author of Bodies of Subversion: A Secret History of Women and Tattoo, she has written for many publications, including the New York Times, the New Yorker, Entertainment Weekly, the Believer, and Salon.com. Mifflin is an assistant professor in the English Department of Lehman College of the City University of New York (CUNY) and directs the Arts and Culture program at CUNY's Graduate School of Journalism, where she also teaches. "The Blue Tattoo is well-researched history that reads like unbelievable fiction, telling the story of Olive Oatman, the first tattooed American white woman. . . . Mifflin weaves together Olive's story with the history of American westward expansion, the Mohave, tattooing in America, and captivity literature in the 1800s."—Elizabeth Quinn, Bust "In The Blue Tattoo, Margot Mifflin slices away the decades of mythology and puts the story in its proper historical context. What emerges is a riveting, well-researched portrait of a young woman—a survivor, but someone marked for life by the experience."—Jon Shumaker, Tucson Weekly "Although Oatman's story on its own is full of intrigue, Mifflin adeptly uses her tale as a springboard for larger issues of the time."—Feminist Review "The Blue Tattoo is well written and well researched; it re-opens the story of white women and men going West and Native people trying to survive these travels."—June Namias, Pacific Historical Review "Mifflin's treatment of Olive's sojourns [provides] an excellent teaching opportunity about America's ongoing captivation with ethnic/gender crossings."—Western American Literature "Mifflin engagingly describes Oatman's ordeal and theorizes about its impact on Oatman herself as well as on popular imagination…. Her book adds nuance to Oatman's story and also humanizes the Mohave who adopted her. Recommended for general readers as well as students and scholars."—Library Journal Southwest Books of the Year, 2009 -- Top Pick Finalist for the 2010 Caroline Bancroft History Prize 2014 One Book Yuma Selection 
Price: 17.05 USD
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285 MILBRODT, TERESA (EDITOR) Manifest West: Even Cowboys Carry Cell Phones.
The University Press of Colorado, Boulder: 2013. Manifest West Series. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Like any legendary figure, the cowboy is part myth and part reality, memorialized by history and Hollywood, envied by those who spend days at desks and dream of trading swivel chairs for saddles. The writings in this anthology serve as testament to the cultural love, bordering on obsession, of the American cowboy. 
Price: 16.10 USD
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286 MILLER, CHAR (EDITOR). River Basins Of The American West: A High Country News Reader.
Oregon State University , Corvallis. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Examining water issues through the lens of major Western U.S. watersheds, River Basins of the American West explores why water has been, and remains, the West's most essential and controversial subject. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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287 MILLER, CHAR (EDITOR). Water In The 21st Century: A High Country News Reader.
Oregon State University Press, Corvallis. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Offers a timely look at the central issue facing the American West—the region's diminishing water supply. A collection of the best reporting on the subject, drawn from the pages of High Country News, the newspaper that sets the standard for coverage of environmental issues in the West. 
Price: 22.99 USD
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288 MILLER, CHAR. Cities And Nature In The American West.
University of Nevada Press, Reno: 2010. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
In less than a century, the American West has transformed from a predominantly rural region to one where most people live in metropolitan centers. Cities and Nature in the American West offers provocative analyses of this transformation. Each essay explores the intersection of environmental, urban, and western history, providing a deeper understanding of the complex processes by which the urban West has shaped and been shaped by its sustaining environment. The book also considers how the West's urban development has altered the human experience and perception of nature, from the administration and marketing of national parks to the consumer roots of popular environmentalism; the politics of land and water use; and the challenges of environmental inequities. A number of essays address the cultural role of wilderness, nature, and such activities as camping. Others examine the increasingly pervasive power of the West's urban areas and urbanites to redefine the very foundations and future of the American West. Char Miller is W. M. Keck Professor of Environmental Analysis at Pomona College. "In Cities and Nature in the American West, leading environmental historians examine how western urban areas and the natural world interact with each other. With particular attention to the economic and cultural impacts between urban areas and their surrounding landscapes, these insightful essays explore and redefine the imagined borders between city and nature. This book is vital reading for anyone with a serious interest in environmental studies in the West." -Carl Abbott, author of How Cities Won the West: Four Centuries of Urban Change in Western North America "This is an interesting book, broad in its context but relatively brief in its length, that underscores the manifold ways in which rapid urban growth and rural, more natural environments have interacted." -H-Environment, H-Net Reviews "The essays comprise some of the best available urban environmental history scholarship and...are superbly written." -Western Historical Quarterly "As an homage to the work and memory of Hal Rothman, and to intellectual curiosity borne of a familiarity with real places, it succeeds admirably." -Oregon Historical Quarterly "This book does not simply honor Hal K. Rothman. It also serves as a valuable introduction to some of the best recent scholarship in environmental history and geography. The volume is remarkable for the consistently high quality of the essays..." -Southern California Quarterly "Where this collection shines is in its range of fascinating themes." -Pacific Northwest Quarterly 
Price: 41.52 USD
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289 MILLER, DARLIS A. Open Range: The Life Of Agnes Morley Cleaveland.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2010. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Agnes Morley Cleaveland found lasting fame after publishing her memoir, No Life for a Lady, in 1941. Her account of growing up on a cattle ranch in west-central New Mexico captivated readers from coast to coast, and it remains in print to this day. In her book, Cleaveland memorably portrayed herself and other ranchwomen as capable workers and independent thinkers. Her life, however, was not limited to the ranch. In Open Range, Darlis A. Miller expands our understanding of Cleaveland's significance, showing how a young girl who was a fearless risk-taker grew up to be a prolific author and well-known social activist. Following a hardscrabble childhood in remote regions of northern and central New Mexico, and then many years of rigorous education, Agnes Morley married Newton Cleaveland in 1899. The couple took up primary residence in Berkeley, California, where Agnes lived another kind of life as clubwoman and activist. Yet Agnes's ranch in the Datil Mountains always drew her back to New Mexico and provided the raw material for her writing. Seen as a whole, Cleaveland's life story spans the years from territorial New Mexico to the Cold War, includes the raising of her four children and interactions with a wide range of national and regional characters, and provides insight into such aspects of western culture as railroads, cattle, and tourism. Her biography is a case study in the roles that wealthy and well-educated women played during the first half of the twentieth century in both domestic and political spheres and will intrigue anyone familiar with the writings of this multifaceted woman. 
Price: 24.65 USD
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290 MOODY, RALPH; SHENTON, EDWARD (ILLUSTRATIONS). Little Britches: Father And I Were Ranchers.
University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln: 1991. 0803281781 / 9780803281783 Reprint Edition. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Ralph Moody was eight years old in 1906 when his family moved from New Hampshire to a Colorado ranch. Through his eyes we experience the pleasures and perils of ranching there early in the twentieth century. Auctions and roundups, family picnics, irrigation wars, tornadoes and wind storms give authentic color to Little Britches. So do adventures, wonderfully told, that equip Ralph to take his father's place when it becomes necessary. Little Britches was the literary debut of Ralph Moody, who wrote about the adventures of his family in eight glorious books, all available as Bison Books. Ralph Moody (1898-1982) is the author of Come on Seabicuit! as well as the Little Britches series about a boy's life on a Colorado ranch, all available in Bison Books editions. "Ralph Moody's books should be read aloud in every family circle in America"—Sterling North "[Moody] has a splendid talent for bringing the ashes of the past into life."—Chicago Sunday Tribune "You will search long . . . To find a more disarming and refreshing account of family life than Ralph Moody has set down in Little Britches."—Chicago Sunday Tribune "This is a gallant book—from the first sentence until the last. It is a true story, written in the first person, written without sentimentality but with extraordinary drama."—Christian Science Monitor "Enthusiastically recommended for young and old."—Library Journal "A most appealing book . . . Its genuineness and its simplicity will build up a large audience of enthusiastic readers."—San Francisco Chronicle "The story of the Moody family is told without embellishment in a simple, straight-forward style. It is especially suited for reading aloud as a family. The difficulties Ralph faces, the mishaps and consequences, will provoke quality discussions with middle schoolers and older students, although children as young as third grade will enjoy and benefit from the story."—Homeschooling Today 
Price: 13.49 USD
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291 MOOS, DAN. Outside America: Race, Ethnicity, And The Role Of The American West In National Belonging.
Dartmouth College Press, Hanover: 2005. 1584655070 / 9781584655077 First Edition. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
A new study of those excluded from the national narrative of the West. Dan Moos challenges both traditional and revisionist perspectives in his exploration of the role of the mythology of the American West in the creation of a national identity. While Moos concurs with contemporary scholars who note that the myths of the American West depended in part upon the exclusion of certain groups—African Americans, Native Americans, and Mormons—he notes that many scholars, in their eagerness to identify and validate such excluded positions, have given short shrift to the cultural power of the myths they seek to debunk. That cultural power was such, Moos notes, that these disenfranchised groups themselves sought to harness it to their own ends through the active appropriation of the terms of those myths in advocating for their own inclusion in the national narrative. Moos reads a variety of texts by such marginalized westerners and argues that, because the construction of American culture was never designed to accommodate these outsiders, their writings display a division between their imagined place in the narrative of the nation and their effacement within the real West marked by intolerance and inequality. Outside America locates the place of the American West in the national culture of turn-of-the-twentieth-century America and considers the ways this narrative was appropriated by those Americans who resided structurally outside of the story. Looking at writers who did not fit into the terms of national unity because of structural differences such as race or religion, I examine how these writers embraced or found themselves caught within the web of that dominant national story that excluded their presence. Many of the writers considered pursued the ideals of American culture—here, the mythic narratives of the American West—in the belief that its broad terms could include their own voices. By writing within these tropes, such writers often dissociate their literary worlds and their everyday lives, revealing the limits of the myths as well as the constraints set upon these outsiders by both political and civil society. In legal, economic, and rhetorical structures, the West served an important role in situating American citizens' ordinary lives."This book deserves wide readership. Moos asks big questions, and his inspired use of three marginalized groups provokes the reader to rethink stock conceptions of U.S. history and the American West. His deft synthesis and analysis also bring new light to the history of African Americans, Mormons, and American Indians."—Register of the Kentucky Historical Society "In Outside America: Race, Ethnicity, and the Role of the American West in National Belonging, Dan Moos examines how people who never benefited from being 'free, white, and twenty-one' nevertheless adopted and adapted facets of dominant western myths and stories as a way of claiming right to an American identity. It's an interesting hypothesis, focusing on African Americans, Native Americans, and Mormons who chose to publish memoir, fiction or, in the case of some of the West's most famous Indians, take part in the fiction that was Buffalo Bill's Wild West."—Western American Literature "Moos makes some useful points illustrating his overarching theme that marginalized groups found ways of including themselves within a frontier mythology that assumed definitive form by the end of the nineteenth century."—The Journal of American History "There is much to admire in this book. The treatments of Sitting Bull, Black Elk, and Luther Standing Bear in particular are worthy of careful study. As Moos shows, all these men found remarkable degrees of creative latitude in performing Indian identities for paying audiences, and all found ways of utilizing frontier myth to their own ends. In this connection, Moo's effort to challenge simplistic arguments about triumphalism in western history is both successful and welcome." —Western Historical Quarterly "Outside America is an outstanding, original analysis of the material fantasies, myths of identity, and vanity narratives of the American West. Dan Moos knowingly compares the arenas of national culture created by Theodore Roosevelt, Oscar Micheaux, Buffalo Bill, Luther Standing Bear, and many other frontier storiers."—Gerald Vizenor, Professor Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley. "So powerful was the image of the West in the national imagination, argues Dan Moos in Outside America, that it offered terms of inclusion to'Americans' as different as Theodore Roosevelt and Oscar Micheaux, Mormonsand Indigenes. Perceptively tracking the power of those terms, especially for those at the social, cultural and economic margins of the U.S., Moos asks what they gained by their appropriation and how it shaped both their experience and the terms of 'American identity.'"—Priscilla Wald, Associate Professor of English, Duke University and author of Constituting Americans: Cultural Anxiety and Narrative Form (1995) 
Price: 23.70 USD
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292 MOOS, DAN. Outside America: Race, Ethnicity, And The Role Of The American West In National Belonging.
Dartmouth College Press, Hanover: 2005. 1584655062 / 9781584655060 First Edition. h Hardcover, no dustjacket (as issued). Brand new book. 
A new study of those excluded from the national narrative of the West. Dan Moos challenges both traditional and revisionist perspectives in his exploration of the role of the mythology of the American West in the creation of a national identity. While Moos concurs with contemporary scholars who note that the myths of the American West depended in part upon the exclusion of certain groups—African Americans, Native Americans, and Mormons—he notes that many scholars, in their eagerness to identify and validate such excluded positions, have given short shrift to the cultural power of the myths they seek to debunk. That cultural power was such, Moos notes, that these disenfranchised groups themselves sought to harness it to their own ends through the active appropriation of the terms of those myths in advocating for their own inclusion in the national narrative. Moos reads a variety of texts by such marginalized westerners and argues that, because the construction of American culture was never designed to accommodate these outsiders, their writings display a division between their imagined place in the narrative of the nation and their effacement within the real West marked by intolerance and inequality. Outside America locates the place of the American West in the national culture of turn-of-the-twentieth-century America and considers the ways this narrative was appropriated by those Americans who resided structurally outside of the story. Looking at writers who did not fit into the terms of national unity because of structural differences such as race or religion, I examine how these writers embraced or found themselves caught within the web of that dominant national story that excluded their presence. Many of the writers considered pursued the ideals of American culture—here, the mythic narratives of the American West—in the belief that its broad terms could include their own voices. By writing within these tropes, such writers often dissociate their literary worlds and their everyday lives, revealing the limits of the myths as well as the constraints set upon these outsiders by both political and civil society. In legal, economic, and rhetorical structures, the West served an important role in situating American citizens' ordinary lives."This book deserves wide readership. Moos asks big questions, and his inspired use of three marginalized groups provokes the reader to rethink stock conceptions of U.S. history and the American West. His deft synthesis and analysis also bring new light to the history of African Americans, Mormons, and American Indians."—Register of the Kentucky Historical Society "In Outside America: Race, Ethnicity, and the Role of the American West in National Belonging, Dan Moos examines how people who never benefited from being 'free, white, and twenty-one' nevertheless adopted and adapted facets of dominant western myths and stories as a way of claiming right to an American identity. It's an interesting hypothesis, focusing on African Americans, Native Americans, and Mormons who chose to publish memoir, fiction or, in the case of some of the West's most famous Indians, take part in the fiction that was Buffalo Bill's Wild West."—Western American Literature "Moos makes some useful points illustrating his overarching theme that marginalized groups found ways of including themselves within a frontier mythology that assumed definitive form by the end of the nineteenth century."—The Journal of American History "There is much to admire in this book. The treatments of Sitting Bull, Black Elk, and Luther Standing Bear in particular are worthy of careful study. As Moos shows, all these men found remarkable degrees of creative latitude in performing Indian identities for paying audiences, and all found ways of utilizing frontier myth to their own ends. In this connection, Moo's effort to challenge simplistic arguments about triumphalism in western history is both successful and welcome." —Western Historical Quarterly "Outside America is an outstanding, original analysis of the material fantasies, myths of identity, and vanity narratives of the American West. Dan Moos knowingly compares the arenas of national culture created by Theodore Roosevelt, Oscar Micheaux, Buffalo Bill, Luther Standing Bear, and many other frontier storiers."—Gerald Vizenor, Professor Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley. "So powerful was the image of the West in the national imagination, argues Dan Moos in Outside America, that it offered terms of inclusion to'Americans' as different as Theodore Roosevelt and Oscar Micheaux, Mormonsand Indigenes. Perceptively tracking the power of those terms, especially for those at the social, cultural and economic margins of the U.S., Moos asks what they gained by their appropriation and how it shaped both their experience and the terms of 'American identity.'"—Priscilla Wald, Associate Professor of English, Duke University and author of Constituting Americans: Cultural Anxiety and Narrative Form (1995) 
Price: 61.75 USD
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293 MORGAN, DALE E. Jedediah Smith And The Opening Of The West.
University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln: 1964. Volume 23 in the Oklahoma Western Biography Series. s Softcover. Very good condition. 
In 1822, before Jedediah Smith entered the West, it was largely an unknown land, "a wilderness," he wrote, "of two thousand miles diameter." During his nine years as a trapper for Ashley and Henry and later for the Rocky Mountain Fur Company, "the mild and Christian young man" blazed the trail westward through South Pass; he was the first to go from the Missouri overland to California, the first to cross the length of Utah and the width of Nevada, first to travel by land up through California and Oregon, first to cross the Sierra Nevada. Before his death on the Santa Fe Trail at the hands of the Comanches, Jed Smith and his partners had drawn the map of the west on a beaver skin. "A scholarly and well written volume of Jedediah Smith, which may well serve as a base for a complete history of the fur trade of the West. Few have attempted and one has achieved such a task."—A. P. Nasatir, American History Review "The chapters are alive with characters. . . . Dale Morgan is a scholar who knows how to write."—J. Frank Dobie, The New York Times "A distinguished work of historical scholarship, based on an absolute command of the sources (including much unpublished material that has recently become accessible), well written, and notable for its analytical depth."—H. N. Smith, New York Herald Tribune "Mr. Morgan has tracked down every scrap of information about Smith . . . and has done a full-scale reconstruction of a commanding figure and a period of great ferment and vitiality."—New Yorker "This is the book on one of the true great men of his era."—J. H. Jackson, San Francisco Chronicle 
Price: 18.95 USD
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294 MORGAN, PHYLLIS S.; SIMMONS, MARC (FOREWORD); KIL, RONALD (ILLUSTRATIONS). As Far As The Eye Could Reach Accounts Of Animals Along The Santa Fe Trail, 1821-1880.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2015. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Travelers and traders taking the Santa Fe Trail's routes from Missouri to New Mexico wrote vivid eyewitness accounts of the diverse and abundant wildlife encountered as they crossed arid plains, high desert, and rugged mountains. Most astonishing to these observers were the incredible numbers of animals, many they had not seen before—buffalo, antelope (pronghorn), prairie dogs, roadrunners, mustangs, grizzlies, and others. They also wrote about the domesticated animals they brought with them, including oxen, mules, horses, and dogs. Their letters, diaries, and memoirs open a window onto an animal world on the plains seen by few people other than the Plains Indians who had lived there for thousands of years. Phyllis S. Morgan has gleaned accounts from numerous primary sources and assembled them into a delightfully informative narrative. She has also explored the lives of the various species, and in this book tells about their behaviors and characteristics, the social relations within and between species, their relationships with humans, and their contributions to the environment and humankind. With skillful prose and a keen eye for a priceless tale, Morgan reanimates the story of life on the Santa Fe Trail's well-worn routes, and its sometimes violent intersection with human life. She provides a stirring view of the land and of the animals visible "as far as the eye could reach," as more than one memoirist described. She also champions the many contributions animals made to the Trail's success and to the opening of the American West. Retired from a 40-year career as a reference and research librarian, educator, and information specialist, Phyllis S. Morgan is now an independent researcher and writer. She is author of the award-winning bio-bibliographies Marc Simmons of New Mexico: Maverick Historian and A Sense of Place: Rudolfo A. Anaya (coauthored with Cesar A. Gonzalez-T.). Marc Simmons holds the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of New Mexico. His publications include more than one hundred articles and nearly two dozen books on the American Southwest, several of them award winners. Ronald Kil is a New Mexico cowboy and artist who has worked on ranches and feedlots all over the West. "This significant and finely crafted study of the animals and human-animal relationships on the historic Road to Santa Fe explains the importance of the animals to travelers and is presented with respect and admiration for those animals. It deserves a wide audience."—Leo E. Oliva, author of Soldiers on the Santa Fe Trail "Morgan's choice of primary sources—diaries, journals, letters, memoirs, and official reports—provides eyewitness accounts rich in colorful detail and fascinating anecdotes. As Far as the Eye Could Reach is a welcome addition to the literature on the historic trails of the Old West."—Deborah Lawrence, coauthor of Writing the Trails: Five Women's Frontier Narratives 
Price: 19.90 USD
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295 MORIN, PAULA. Honest Horses: Wild Horses In The Great Basin.
University of Nevada Press, Reno: 2006. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Horses have been part of the American West since the first Spanish explorers brought their European-bred steeds onto the new continent. Soon thereafter, some of these animals, lost or abandoned by their owners or captured by indigenous peoples, became the foundation of the great herds of mustangs (from the Spanish mesteĖo, stray) that still roam the West. These feral horses are inextricably intertwined with the culture, economy, and mythology of the West. The current situation of the mustangs as vigorous competitors for the scanty resources of the West's drought-parched rangelands has put them at the center of passionate controversies about their purpose, place, and future on the open range. Photographer/oral historian Paula Morin has interviewed sixty-two people who know these horses best: ranchers, horse breeders and trainers, Native Americans, veterinarians, wild horse advocates, mustangers, range scientists, cowboy poets, western historians, wildlife experts, animal behaviorists, and agents of the federal Bureau of Land Management. The result is the most comprehensive, impartial examination yet of the history and impact of wild mustangs in the Great Basin. Morin elicits from her interviewees a range of expertise, insight, and candid opinion about the nature of horses, ranching, and the western environment. Honest Horses brings us the voices of authentic westerners, people who live intimately with horses and the land, who share their experiences and love of the mustangs, and who understand how precariously all life exists in Great Basin. Reviews "The firsthand knowledge of the lives of wild horses and the pressures on their environment that Morin has gathered creates an excellent and essential primer on the need for truly aiding wild horses, not just making humans feel better." —Colleen Mondor, Booklist, 1 March 2006 "The candid opinions expressed in this book make it truly deserving of the Western genre, and the work deserves a prominent place on every horse lover's bookshelf." —Meghan Saar, True West, September 2006 "For this reviewer, the best parts were the treatises on Great Basin ecology and natural history, and the stories of wild horse hunting and mustanging in the old days....This is a worthwhile book, which, hopefully, will stimulate thought and dialog followed by steps to solve the problems described." —Patrick Hearty, Utah Historical Quarterly 74.3, Summer 2006 "This is a thoughtful book, and these narratives are fascinating precisely because they are not sugar-coated or romanticized."—Art Horse Magazine, Summer 2006 "Vivid and enthralling accounts of the pleasures and sorrows of a lifetime spent in horsemanship." - New Mexico Historical Review "It is practical, unembellished, and truthful...this printed mosaic of Morin's may well be a cornerstone in the foundation of understanding needed to provide an answer to the question of balance and the wild horses in the Great Basin." - I.M. Cowgirl "It is a collage, and the impartial big picture is beautiful in its possibilities, tragedies, triumphs, and shear gravity of just what exists in this moment for these horses." - Eclectic Horseman Contents 
Price: 23.70 USD
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296 MOUL, FRANCIS; JOUTRAS, GEORG (PHOTOGRAPHY). The National Grasslands: A Guide To America's Undiscovered Treasures.
University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln: 2006. s Softcover. Very good condition. 
The four million windswept acres of wildflowers and grass in the twenty national grasslands in the United States are scattered across a region extending from the Pacific Ocean to the eastern edge of North Dakota. Although all were once seas of grass teeming with wildlife, they now exhibit striking differences, and range from a small lake recreation area in Texas to the enormous Little Missouri National Grasslands in North Dakota. An essential guide to the American grasslands and the Grasslands National Park of Canada, The National Grasslands presents a history of the region, that traces the establishment of the national grasslands as an important part of the New Deal's social revolution. The guide also provides a concise summary of the debates surrounding preservation and use, with special focus on the Buffalo Commons controversy. Each national grassland receives individual attention, including overviews of flora and fauna, clear descriptions of terrain and noteworthy natural features, and vital information on grasslands' history, visitor centers, and ranger stations. All the articles in this first full-length book on the history of the national grasslands are richly illustrated with maps and exquisite photographs by the noted Great Plains photographer Georg Joutras. Francis Moul is an environmental historian and retired newspaper publisher living in Lincoln, Nebraska. Georg Joutras is a professional wildlife and landscape photographer who lives in Lincoln. He is the author of Along the Edge of Daylight: Photographic Travels from Nebraska and the Great Plains (Nebraska 2005). Contains 28 color phots and maps. "A descriptive guide and excellent discussion of the 20 American National Grasslands and the Grasslands National Park of Canada."—K. B. Sterling, Choice 
Price: 18.72 USD
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297 MOULTON, CANDY. Valentine T. Mcgillycuddy: Army Surgeon, Agent To The Sioux.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2011. Volume 35 in Western Frontiersmen. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
A doctor and Indian agent's fascinating life on the northern plains. On a September day in 1877, hundreds of Sioux and soldiers at Camp Robinson crowded around a fatally injured Lakota leader. A young doctor forced his way through the crowd, only to see the victim fading before him. It was the famed Crazy Horse. From intense moments like this to encounters with such legendary western figures as Calamity Jane and Red Cloud, Valentine Trant O'Connell McGillycuddy's life (1849-1939) encapsulated key events in American history that changed the lives of Native people forever. In Valentine T. McGillycuddy: Army Surgeon, Agent to the Sioux, the first biography of the man in seventy years, award-winning author Candy Moulton explores McGillycuddy's fascinating experiences on the northern plains as topographer, cartographer, physician, and Indian agent. Drawing on family papers, interviews, government documents, and a host of other sources, Moulton presents a colorful character—a thin, blue-eyed, cultured physician who could outdrink trail-hardened soldiers. In fresh, vivid prose, she traces McGillycuddy's work mapping out the U.S.-Canadian border; treating the wounded from the battles of the Rosebud, the Little Bighorn, and Slim Buttes; tending to Crazy Horse during his final hours; and serving as agent to the Sioux at Pine Ridge, where he clashed with Chief Red Cloud over the government's assimilation policies. Along the way, Moulton weaves in the perspective of McGillycuddy's devoted first wife, Fanny, who followed her husband west and wrote of the realities of camp life. McGillycuddy's doctoring of Crazy Horse marked only one point of his interaction with American Indians. But those relationships were also just one aspect of his life in the West, which extended well into the twentieth century. Enhanced by more than 20 photographs, this long-overdue biography offers general readers and historians an engaging adventure story as well as insight into a period of tumultuous change. Candy Moulton is the award-winning author of eleven books on western history, including Chief Joseph: Guardian of the People and Everyday Life among the American Indians, 1800 to 1900. She lives in Wyoming. 
Price: 18.95 USD
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298 MOULTON, CANDY. Valentine T. Mcgillycuddy: Army Surgeon, Agent To The Sioux.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2011. Volume 35 in Western Frontiersmen. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
A doctor and Indian agent's fascinating life on the northern plains. On a September day in 1877, hundreds of Sioux and soldiers at Camp Robinson crowded around a fatally injured Lakota leader. A young doctor forced his way through the crowd, only to see the victim fading before him. It was the famed Crazy Horse. From intense moments like this to encounters with such legendary western figures as Calamity Jane and Red Cloud, Valentine Trant O'Connell McGillycuddy's life (1849-1939) encapsulated key events in American history that changed the lives of Native people forever. In Valentine T. McGillycuddy: Army Surgeon, Agent to the Sioux, the first biography of the man in seventy years, award-winning author Candy Moulton explores McGillycuddy's fascinating experiences on the northern plains as topographer, cartographer, physician, and Indian agent. Drawing on family papers, interviews, government documents, and a host of other sources, Moulton presents a colorful character—a thin, blue-eyed, cultured physician who could outdrink trail-hardened soldiers. In fresh, vivid prose, she traces McGillycuddy's work mapping out the U.S.-Canadian border; treating the wounded from the battles of the Rosebud, the Little Bighorn, and Slim Buttes; tending to Crazy Horse during his final hours; and serving as agent to the Sioux at Pine Ridge, where he clashed with Chief Red Cloud over the government's assimilation policies. Along the way, Moulton weaves in the perspective of McGillycuddy's devoted first wife, Fanny, who followed her husband west and wrote of the realities of camp life. McGillycuddy's doctoring of Crazy Horse marked only one point of his interaction with American Indians. But those relationships were also just one aspect of his life in the West, which extended well into the twentieth century. Enhanced by more than 20 photographs, this long-overdue biography offers general readers and historians an engaging adventure story as well as insight into a period of tumultuous change. Candy Moulton is the award-winning author of eleven books on western history, including Chief Joseph: Guardian of the People and Everyday Life among the American Indians, 1800 to 1900. She lives in Wyoming. 
Price: 25.60 USD
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299 MOYLAN, BRIDGET. Glacier's Grandest: A Pictorial History Of The Hotels And Chalets Of Glacier National Park.
Pictorial Histories Publishing, Missoula. 0929521897 / 9780929521893 Sixth Printing. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
A Pictorial History of the Hotels and Chalets of Glacier National Park - 73 photos, 8 pgs. of color. 
Price: 8.50 USD
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300 MOZINGO, HUGH N. Shrubs Of The Great Basin: A Natural History.
University of Nevada Press, Reno:1987. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Mozingo presents the life histories of more than sixty species of both common and unusual shrubs, and discusses how shrubs grow, reproduce, and adapt to the extreme weather conditions that are part of daily life in the Great Basin. Drawings by Christine Stetter. Dr. Hugh Mozingo is Professor Emeritus of Botany and former curator of the herbarium at the University of Nevada. "Shrubs of the Great Basin is long overdue." —Stanley W. Paher, Las Vegas Review Journal, December 20 1987 "A most welcome addition to the floristic works of recent years. Profusely illustrated, the book is professionally written by a plant taxonomist who has spent more than two decades of his career in this region. Mozingo brings to life these desert shrubs that have for too long been unknown by almost everyone." —W.A. Niering, CHOICE, March 1988 "Written for the layperson, this encyclopedic treatise covers 67 species of Great Basin shrubs with details of the life histories, origin of name, familial characteristics, evolution, adaptation to environment, economic uses, and other interesting information. The color photography is outstanding, as are the line drawings of the shrubs that are native to this part of the country. It is a highly readable book for the nonscientist who wants more information than is given in the usual field guides. Although this excellent book is mainly of interest to westerners, it is of great interest to any botanical library where detailed histories and descriptions of plants in the United States are needed." —Carolyn Dodson, Science and Technology Annual Reference Review "Hugh Mozingo's descriptive essays on sixty-five shrubs join the other efforts in the Max C. Fleischmann series in Great Basin Natural History as classics. I do not use this word lightly. If it were to dream of living in one place for the rest of my life with one superlative set of nature guides at my side the Fleischmann series would compel me to live in the Great Basin. To date, series editor Rick Stetter has released well-written, beautifully designed books on Great Basin geology, fishes, birds, trees, and shrubs." —Gary P. Nabhan, Journal of the Southwest, Summer 1989 
Price: 37.95 USD
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