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AMERICAN WEST.

AMERICAN WEST.

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341 PUTMAN, JOHN C. Class And Gender Politics In Progressive-era Seattle.
University of Nevada Press, Reno: 2008. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
The dawn of the twentieth century saw enormous changes throughout the United States, reflecting technological advances, population growth, widespread industrialization, and the establishment of a national market economy. In the Far West, these changes, combined with the rapid westward expansion of advanced capitalism and the impact of national political and economic pressures, brought with them a period of political conflict, social upheavals, and labor struggles. Seattle boomed during this period. By the end of the nineteenth century, the city was home to several powerful and influential labor organizations, as well as a vibrant middle-class feminist movement. In this turbulent interface of class, gender, politics, and sometimes race, residents struggled to cope with a changing social order and with conflicting visions of what the West was supposed to be. In this book, historian John C. Putman expands our understanding of the roles that gender and class played in the construction of progressive politics. He also shows how regional differences—in this case, the unique environment of the Pacific Northwest—contributed to Seattle's economic and political development. John Putman is an Associate Professor of History at San Diego State University. "...This book is a valuable contribution to our understanding of how women and workers in an urban community that was struggling with growing pains attempted to set the agenda for urban politics." -—Western Historical Quarterly "Putman skillfully chronicles how labor and women's groups (representing both middle- and lower-income women) worked together to promote reform in Seattle before World War I. To my knowledge, there is no book set in the urban West that examines the political relationships between these groups and certainly none that does with the analytical prowess of Putman's." -Eugene P. Moehring, author of Urbanism and Empire in the Far West, 1840-1890 "What this book has to offer, in contrast to the existent literature, is a study of Seattle, an important urban center where major labor conflicts of the early twentieth century occurred in a state that granted women suffrage early and in which women's organizations had important influence and power. John Putman places this study in the context of the expanding field of western history and connects his work to it by emphasizing 'the New West' as a focus for both historical development and scholarly attention." -Elizabeth V. Faue, author of Community of Suffering and Struggle: Women, Men, and the Labor Movement in Minneapolis, 1915-1945 
Price: 37.95 USD
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342 QUINLAN, ANGUS R. Great Basin Rock Art: Archaeological Perspectives.
University of Nevada Press, Reno: 2007. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Rock art is one of humankind's most ancient forms of artistic expression, and one of its most enigmatic. For centuries, scholars and other observers have struggled to interpret the meaning of the mysterious figures incised or painted on natural rocks and to understand their role in the lives of their long-vanished creators. The Great Basin of the American West is especially rich in rock art, but until recently North American archaeologists have largely ignored these most visible monuments left by early Native Americans and have given little attention to the terrain surrounding them. In Great Basin Rock Art, twelve respected rock art researchers examine a number of significant sites from the dual perspectives of settlement archaeology and contemporary Native American interpretations of the role of rock art in their cultural past. The authors demonstrate how modern archaeological methodology and interpretations are providing a rich physical and cultural context for these ancient and hitherto puzzling artifacts. They offer exciting new insights into the lives of North America's first inhabitants. This is essential reading for anyone interested in the petroglyphs of the American West and in the history of the Great Basin and its original peoples. Angus R. Quinlan holds a Ph.D. in the archaeology of religion from the University of Southampton, England. He is currently deputy director of the Nevada Rock Art Foundation, where he supervises the archaeological documentation of rock art sites in Nevada. He is also the editor for Summit Envirosolutions, a cultural resources management company. "This book deals with new research directions in rock art studies. The essays are diverse and present views that are at the forefront of rock art research in western North America and elsewhere." —Colleen M. Beck, Desert Research Institute "The essays in this book share a common theme of exploring the archaeological and landscape context in understanding and interpreting rock art, as opposed to relying primarily on a consideration of imagery. This book moves rock art research forward from its current stalled state arguing about shamanic theory and rock art interpretation." —William D. Hyder, University of California, Santa Cruz "...contributes substantially to the justified integration of rock art research into the broader context of North American archaeology." - Journal of California and Great Basin Anthropology 
Price: 47.45 USD
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343 REES, TONY. Arc Of The Medicine Line: Mapping The World's Longest Undefended Border Across The Western Plains.
University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln: 2008. First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Today the borderland between Canada and the United States is a wide, empty sweep of wheat fields and pasture, measured by a grid of gravel roads that sees little traffic and few people who do not make their lives there. It has been much this way for more than a century now, but there was a moment when the great silence shrouding this place was broken, and that moment changed it forever. Arc of the Medicine Line is a compelling narrative of that moment—the completion of the official border between the United States and Canada in 1874. In late July of 1874, the Sweetgrass Hills sheltered the greatest accumulation of scientists, teamsters, scouts, cooks, and soldiers to be seen in this part of the world before the coming of the railways. The men of the boundary commissions—American, British, and Canadian—established an astronomical station and the last of their supply depots as they prepared to draw the Medicine Line across the final hundred of the nearly nine hundred miles between Manitoba's Lake of the Woods and the Continental Divide. In the brief weeks the surveyors and soldiers spent in Milk River country, they witnessed, and played a singular part in, the beginning of the end for the open West. That hot, dry summer of 1874 marked the outside world's final assault on this last frontier. Tony Rees is the author of Hope's Last Home: Travels in Milk River Country and Polo: The Galloping Game. 
Price: 29.40 USD
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344 REMINGTON, FREDERICK (ILLUSTRATIONS); WISTER, OWEN (COMMENTARY); JACKSON, MARTA (EDITED WITH A CONCISE BIOGRAPHY AND AN ACCOUNT OF REMINGTON'S WORK AND CAREER). The Illustrations Of Frederic Remington With A Commentary By Owen Wister.
Bounty Books, New York: 1970. First Edition (Unstated). h Hardcover with dustjacket in protective mylar cover. Good condition. Library discard. 
Represents the surprising range of the illustrations of Frederick Remingngton, celebrated painter and historian of the American West. Historically faithful to fact, he illustrated with the greatest fidelity to detail the American Indian and the cavalry, soldiery,and artillery that eventually tamed the Wild West as the artist had first known it. 
Price: 34.39 USD
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345 REMINGTON, FREDERICK; SCHARNHORST, GARY (INTRODUCTION & NOTES). John Ermine Of The Yellowstone.
University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln and London: 2008. First Edition. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
No one knew how the blue-eyed, blond-haired white baby came to be abandoned, but the Crow tribe that found him raised him as one of its own. As he grew into adolescence, White Weasel was taken to Crooked-Bear, a white man who had long ago abandoned society for a solitary mountain existence and who acted as counselor to the Crow elders. Under Crooked-Bear's tutelage, White Weasel was schooled in white ways and rechristened John Ermine. Frederic Remington's compelling tale relates Ermine's successful reintroduction into white society, his heroic exploits as a scout in the military, and his growing interest in a white lady, Miss Katherine Searles. In his love for Katherine, Ermine must face the complexities and inequalities of American society. Although American culture may well laud Ermine's military prowess and personal integrity, since he is "wild" he can never truly rise through the ranks of society. It is inevitable that Ermine's story ends in tragedy. John Ermine of the Yellowstone is both an epic Western in the classic sense and a complex tale that captures the conflict between European Americans and Native Americans in the Wild West. John Ermine is the tragic character caught between two cultures, unable to assimilate fully into either. Famed artist Frederic Remington uses his pen to convey the irreparable stalemate between two groups of people in an untamed West while making a moving argument for the preservation of a truly wild western front. Frederic Remington (1861-1909) is best known as a painter, illustrator, and sculptor of iconic images of the American West. Gary Scharnhorst is a distinguished professor of English at the University of New Mexico, the author or editor of more than thirty books, and past president of the Western Literature Association. 
Price: 14.20 USD
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346 RICKER, ELI S.; JENSEN, RICHARD E. (EDITOR). Voices Of The American West Volume 2: The Settler And Soldier Interviews Of Eli S Ricker 1903-1919.
University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln: 2005. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
In this second volume of interviews conducted by Nebraska judge Eli S. Ricker, he focuses on white eyewitnesses and participants in the occupying and settling of the American West in the nineteenth century. In the first decade of the twentieth century, as the Old West became increasingly distant and romanticized in popular consciousness, Eli S. Ricker (1842-1926) began interviewing those who had experienced it firsthand, hoping to write a multivolume series about its last days, centering on the conflicts between Natives and outsiders. For years Ricker traveled across the northern Plains, gathering information on and off reservations, in winter and in summer. Judge Ricker never wrote his book, but his interviews are priceless sources of information about that time and place, and they offer more balanced perspectives on events than were accepted at the time. Richard E. Jensen brings together all of Ricker's interviews with those men and women who came to the American West from elsewhere—settlers, homesteaders, and veterans. These interviews shed light on such key events as the massacre at Wounded Knee, the Little Bighorn battle, Beecher Island, Lightning Creek, the Mormon cow incident, and the Washita massacre. Also of interest are glimpses of everyday life at different agencies, including Pine Ridge, Yellow Medicine, and Fort Sill School; brief though revealing memoirs; and snapshots of cattle drives, conflicts with Natives, and the construction of the Union Pacific Railroad. 
Price: 52.96 USD
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347 RICKER, ELI S.; JENSEN, RICHARD E. (EDITOR). Voices Of The American West Volume 2: The Settler And Soldier Interviews Of Eli S Ricker 1903-1919.
University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln: 2005. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
In this second volume of interviews conducted by Nebraska judge Eli S. Ricker, he focuses on white eyewitnesses and participants in the occupying and settling of the American West in the nineteenth century. In the first decade of the twentieth century, as the Old West became increasingly distant and romanticized in popular consciousness, Eli S. Ricker (1842-1926) began interviewing those who had experienced it firsthand, hoping to write a multivolume series about its last days, centering on the conflicts between Natives and outsiders. For years Ricker traveled across the northern Plains, gathering information on and off reservations, in winter and in summer. Judge Ricker never wrote his book, but his interviews are priceless sources of information about that time and place, and they offer more balanced perspectives on events than were accepted at the time. Richard E. Jensen brings together all of Ricker's interviews with those men and women who came to the American West from elsewhere—settlers, homesteaders, and veterans. These interviews shed light on such key events as the massacre at Wounded Knee, the Little Bighorn battle, Beecher Island, Lightning Creek, the Mormon cow incident, and the Washita massacre. Also of interest are glimpses of everyday life at different agencies, including Pine Ridge, Yellow Medicine, and Fort Sill School; brief though revealing memoirs; and snapshots of cattle drives, conflicts with Natives, and the construction of the Union Pacific Railroad. 
Price: 52.49 USD
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348 ROBINSON III, CHARLES M. The Frontier World Of Fort Griffin: The Life And Death Of A Western Town.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman:2016 . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Fort Griffin, Texas, is rarely used in the same sentence with Dodge City, Deadwood and Tombstone, yet this frontier town was every bit as tough as the places that went down in brutal history. Vigilantes, lynchings, ladies of easy virtue, buffalo hunting, gambling, posses, more lynchings, and lawmen as bad as the outlaws they jailed, Fort Griffin had it all, bustling with a raw life not for the faint-of-heart. Commonly known as the Flat, Fort Griffin grew from a military post rife with Indian trouble, to a spirited, rough-hewn collection of fold, only to burn out in a matter of decades. Within that time it helped mold characters equal to any of legend. John Larn, the Flat's second sheriff, was not only considered one of the best lawmen in the county, he was also a cattle thief and killer, and died as violently as he had lived. Colonel Ranald MacKenzie, commanding officer of the Fourth Cavalry, was the man whose savvy and knowledge would eventually put an end to the savage Indian attacks that had plagued Fort Griffin and surrounding territories. Lottie Deno was the celebrity of Fort Griffin's floating world. With a mysterious past and uncommon elegance for women in her trade, her time in the Flat was to end with the tragic murder of her lover. Fort Griffin had all the makings of the legendary western town, and was an archetype for the untamed frontier life. Its story is one of passion, anger, lawlessness and occasional justice, and will further establish the Flat as a truly original pioneer town. Charles M. Robinson III is the author of A Good Year to Die: The Story of the Great Sioux War and General Crook and the Western Frontier, both published by the University of Oklahoma Press. 
Price: 14.20 USD
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349 RONALD, ANN. Ghostwest: Reflections Past And Present.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2005. Volume 7 in the Literature of the American West series. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Our sense of place is permeated by ghosts from the past. In GhostWest, Ann Ronald takes the reader to historical sites where something once happened. Using the metaphor of hauntings, she reflects on how western history, literature, and lore continue to shape our visceral impressions of these sites. In chapters both lyrical and thoughtful, passionate and humorous, GhostWest covers sites in seventeen western states, including the Little Bighorn Battlefield in Montana, Willa Cather's Nebraska prairies, and the Murrah Building bombing site in Oklahoma. Through these settings and their phantoms, the author mulls questions of why we find such ambience and artifacts so compelling. 22 black-and-white Illustrations, 3 maps, 256 pages, 5.5" x 8.5". Ann Ronald is Foundation Professor of English at the University of Nevada, Reno. Her books include Earthtones: A Nevada Album, The New West of Edward Abbey, Reader of the Purple Sage, and GhostWest: Reflections Past and Present. "A well written, entertaining, and often enlightening personal tour of the West."—Elliott West, author of The Contested Plains 
Price: 18.95 USD
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350 RONDA, JAMES P. Lewis And Clark Among The Indians, Bicentennial Edition.
University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln and London: 2002. Bicentennial Edition with a new introduction by the author. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
James P. Ronda holds the H. G. Barnard Chair in Western History at the University of Tulsa. He is also the author of Finding the West: Explorations with Lewis and Clark and Astoria and Empire, available in a Bison Books edition. "Particularly valuable for Ronda's inclusion of pertinent background information about the various tribes and for his ethnological analysis. An appendix also places the Sacagawea myth in its proper perspective. Gracefully written, the book bridges the gap between academic and general audiences."—Choice "James P. Ronda in Lewis and Clark among the Indians has drawn from the journals and other documents a compelling narrative of the expedition's encounters with the Indians. It is a story of discovery and suspense, and it is told with a modern concern to understand the Indian side as well as the white in the meeting of the two cultures."—William and Mary Quarterly "A welcome and progressive volume in the growing literature on the significance of America's most famous exploratory trek. James Ronda retraces the trail of Lewis and Clark and provides a refreshing context to an event in U.S. history that has become part of our national mythology. . . . He also gives faces and personalities to the many native leaders and their kinsmen and kinswomen who hosted, traded with, slept with, and on occasion scrapped with the expeditionaries."—Ethnohistory "This book is an important contribution to Indian ethnohistory and to the literature of the Lewis and Clark expedition."—American Indian Quarterly 
Price: 17.05 USD
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351 ROSA, JOSEPH G. Age Of The Gunfighter: Men And Weapons On The Frontier, 1840 - 1900.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 1995. 0806127619 / 9780806127613 s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Based upon contemporary and informed opinion, Age of the Gunfighter tells of a tempestuous time and many a notorious gunfighter. Few of those who achieved fame and a reputation lived into old age. Ed Masterson, Tom Smith, and Bill Tilghman, for example, died in the line of duty. Others, like Wild Bill Hickok, Jesse James, and Billy the Kid, were murdered because of their reputations, at the hands of the law or for personal or financial gain. And the few who survived into old age in the twentieth century, such as Wyatt Earp, were men out of place and time, steeped in nostalgia for an era gone but immortalized as the age of the gunfighter. 
Price: 31.30 USD
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352 RUSSELL, DON. Lives And Legends Of Buffalo Bill.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 1979. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Few western American have been more often written about than William F. Cody, the "Buffalo Bill" of history, the dime novel, and popular lore. There are several important aspects of this biography. The whole career of the plainsman is presented - it is the only biography, in fact, that contains any major assault on the army records dealing with Cody's scouting career - and it relates with skill and insight the truths behind the legends exploited in contemporary dime novels, the stage, and the Wild West show. Don Russell has also edited Captain Charles King's Campaigning with Crook (Norman, 1964). The author of The Lives and Legends of Buffalo Bill (Norman, 1960), he is also editor of The Westerners Brand Book and an associate editor of the New Standard Encyclopedia. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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353 SAILOR, RACHEL MCLEAN. Meaningful Places: Landscape Photographers In The Nineteenth-century American West.
University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Winner of the 2016 Barbara Sudler Award from History Colorado. The early history of photography in America coincided with the Euro-American settlement of the West. This thoughtful book argues that the rich history of western photography cannot be understood by focusing solely on the handful of well-known photographers whose work has come to define the era. Art historian Rachel Sailor points out that most photographers in the West were engaged in producing images for their local communities. These pictures didn't just entertain the settlers but gave them a way to understand their new home. Photographs could help the settlers adjust to their new circumstances by recording the development of a place—revealing domestication, alteration, and improvement. The book explores the cultural complexity of regional landscape photography, western places, and local sociopolitical concerns. Photographic imagery, like western paintings from the same era, enabled Euro-Americans to see the new landscape through their own cultural lenses, shaping the idea of the frontier for the people who lived there. 7 x 10 in., 240 pages, 106, halftones, 3 maps. Rachel McLean Sailor is an assistant professor of art history at the University of Wyoming. "Rich with pictures, Meaningful Places teases out the layers of meaning in late nineteenth-century western photography and recounts the experiences of some fascinating . . . landscape photographers." --Kansas History "An interesting and creatively conceived book." --Nebraska History "[Meaningful Places] is a terrific engagement with significant western photography that has slipped out of view of most scholarship. It will be a thought-provoking addition to the library of anyone interested in the role of photography in culture." --Montana The Magazine of Western History "Engaging and accessible. . . . Sailor carries an important thread throughout the book: we need to examine Native Americans' relationships to photographed landscapes and the ways in which photographers acknowledged those relationships, rewrote them to fit their own purposes, or ignored them completely." --Oregon Historical Quarterly "Sailor's study of resident western photographers demonstrates impressive breadth and expands the literature on the role of the medium in the Euro-American settlement of the region. Full of previously unpublished camera-images from western state historical societies and museums, as well as well-known national collections, Meaningful Places offers a rich beginning for more locally oriented histories of photography in the nineteenth-century American West." -- Panorama 
Price: 43.70 USD
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354 SAUDER, ROBERT A. The Yuma Reclamation Project: Irrigation, Indian Allotment, And Settlement Along The Lower Colorado River.
University of Nevada Press, Reno: 2009. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
In the arid American West, settlement was generally contingent on the availability of water to irrigate crops and maintain livestock and human residents. Early irrigation projects were usually the cooperative efforts of pioneer farmers, but by the early twentieth century they largely reflected federal intentions to create new farms out of the western public domain. The Yuma Reclamation Project, authorized in 1904, was one of the earliest federal irrigation projects initiated in the western United States and the first authorized on the Colorado River. Its story exemplifies the range of difficulties associated with settling the nation's final frontier—the remaining irrigable lands in the arid West, including Indian lands—and illuminates some of the current issues and conflicts concerning the Colorado River. Author Robert Sauder's detailed, meticulously researched examination of the Yuma Project illustrates the complex multiplicity of problems and challenges associated with the federal government's attempt to facilitate homesteading in the arid West. He examines the history of settlement along the lower Colorado River from earliest times, including the farming of the local Quechan people and the impact of Spanish colonization, and he reviews the engineering problems that had to be resolved before an industrial irrigation scheme could be accomplished. The study also sheds light on myriad unanticipated environmental, economic, and social challenges that the government had to confront in bringing arid lands under irrigation, including the impact on the Native American population of the region. The Yuma Reclamation Project is an original and significant contribution to our understanding of federal reclamation endeavors in the West. It provides new and fascinating information about the history of the Yuma Valley and, as a case study of irrigation policy, it offers compelling insights into the history and consequences of water manipulation in the arid West. Robert A. Sauder is professor emeritus of geography at the University of New Orleans. He is also the author of The Lost Frontier: Water Diversion in the Growth and Destruction of Owens Valley Agriculture and others. "A thoughtful analysis of economic and social as well as environmental factors of the time, The Yuma Reclamation Project is sufficiently thorough to satisfy profesional scholars yet thoroughly accessible to readers of all backgrounds." - The Midwest Book Review 
Price: 53.39 USD
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355 SAYERS, ISABELLE S. Annie Oakley And Buffalo Bill's Wild West.
Dover Publications, New York: 1981. 0486241203 / 9780486241203 First edition (unstated). s Softcover. Good condition. Page facing title page is missing. 
Provides a wonderful behind-the-scenes look at the life and career of Annie Oakley - her impoverished girlhood, long and devoted marriage to Frank Butler, early years with the Sells Brothers Circus, and especially 17 years spent touring with Buffalo Bill (William F. Cody). Contains more than 100 rare photographs, posters, handbills and other memorabilia document Annie, Buffalo Bill, Johnnie Baker and other members of the famous troupe; the show tour in Europe; Annie's celebrated trick shots, and famous visitors. Contains 102 illustrations. 
Price: 18.76 USD
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356 SCHAEFER, JACK WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY HAROLD E. WEST. Old Ramon.
University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Awarded a 1961 Newbery Honor, Old Ramon tells the timeless coming-of-age story of a young boy who spends a summer with an old shepherd in the Mojave Desert. He leaves his textbooks behind for real life lessons with Ramon as his mentor. He learns not only how to care for the sheep but how to overcome fear, how to face death and responsibility, and the difference between being alone and being lonely. Written in Schaefer's charming and engaging style, the novel details a boy's discovery of both the value of friendship and the hardship of life. 5.5 x 8 in., 112 pages, 12 drawings. Jack Schaefer was a journalist and writer known for his authentic and memorable characters set in the American West. Schaefer received the Western Literature Association's Distinguished Achievement Award in 1975 and the Saddleman Award in 1986 from the Western Writers of America. His popular Western novels include Shane (1949) and Monte Walsh (1963). "It is an account told with dignity and simple strength, a tale which will win the reader with its convincing depiction of a pastoral life and its tender portrayal of a natural and abiding friendship." --Kirkus 
Price: 18.95 USD
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357 SCHAEFER, JACK. Heroes Without Glory: Some Good Men Of The Old West.
University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
This collection of essays features twelve "heroes" from the American West. Schaefer profiles pioneers of the West—the doctors, explorers, and cowboys who settled the challenging landscape and built communities in the Old West. These unsung champions highlight the unglorified work of the West that was achieved without violence and gunslinging. Schaefer shares the lives of Grizzly Adams, George A. Ruston, John "Snowshoe" Thompson, John Phillips, Washakie, John S. Chisum, Thomas J. Smith, Valentine T. McGillycuddy, Charles Fox Gardiner, and Elfego Baca. Western enthusiasts and history buffs will welcome the refreshing biographies of the men found in this volume. Jack Schaefer was a journalist and writer known for his authentic and memorable characters set in the American West. Schaefer received the Western Literature Association's Distinguished Achievement Award in 1975 and the Saddleman Award in 1986 from the Western Writers of America. His popular Western novels include Shane (1949) and Monte Walsh (1963). "The rhetorical flourishes are those of the born storyteller and legend builder." --Kirkus Reviews "Twelve 'good men' of the West support Schaefer's thesis that these men are much more interesting than the overpublicized bad men." --Booklist 
Price: 24.65 USD
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358 SCHARNHORST, GARY. Owen Wister And The West.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2015. Volume 30 in Oklahoma Western Biographies. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
From James Fenimore Cooper to Gary Cooper, stories set in the American West have served as vehicles for topical commentary. More than any other pioneer of the genre, Owen Wister turned the Western into a form of social and political critique, touching on such issues as race, the environment, women's rights, and immigration. In Owen Wister and the West, a biographical-literary account of Wister's life and writings, Gary Scharnhorst shows how the West shaped Wister's career and ideas, even as he lived and worked in the East. The Virginian, Wister's claim to literary fame, was published in 1902, but his writing career actually began in 1891 and continued for twenty-five years after the publication of his masterpiece. Scharnhorst traces Wister's western connections up to and through the publication of The Virginian and shows that the author remained deeply connected to the American West until his death in 1938. Like his Harvard friend Theodore Roosevelt, Wister was the sickly scion of an eastern family who recuperated in the West before returning to his home and inherited social position. His life story is punctuated with appearances by such contemporaries as Frederic Remington, Rudyard Kipling, and Ernest Hemingway. Scharnhorst thoroughly discusses Wister's experiences in the West, including a detailed chronology of his travels and the writings that grew out of them. He offers numerous insights into Wister's adroit use of sources, and provides revealing comparisons between Wister's western works and the writings of other authors treating the same region. The West, Scharnhorst shows, was the crucible in which Wister tested and expressed his political opinions, most of them startlingly conservative by present standards. Yet The Virginian remains the template for the western novel today. More than any other Western writer of the past century and a half, Wister's career merits resurrection. 9 black and white illustrations, 5.5" x 8.5". Gary Scharnhorst is Professor Emeritus of English at the University of New Mexico and author of numerous books, including Bret Harte: Opening the American Literary West and Julian Hawthorne: The Life of a Prodigal Son. "In this welcome new biography, Gary Scharnhorst corrects the impression left by previous biographers of Owen Wister that, after The Virginian, Wister paid little attention to the American West. As Scharnhorst shows, Wister instead continued to make the West an important theme in his travels, fiction, letters, and personal contacts. A lively and thoughtful writer, Scharnhorst shows once again why he is at the forefront of literary scholars."—Glen Love, author of Practical Ecocriticism: Literature, Biology, and the Environment 
Price: 23.70 USD
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359 SCHIEFFELIN, EDWARD; R. BRUCE CRAIG (EDITION). Portrait Of A Prospector: Edward Schieffelin's Own Story.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2017. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Edward "Ed" Schieffelin (1847-1897) was the epitome of the American frontiersman. A former Indian scout, he discovered what would become known as the legendary Tombstone, Arizona, silver lode in 1877. His search for wealth followed a path well-trod by thousands who journeyed west in the mid to late nineteenth century to try their luck in mining country. But unlike typical prospectors who spent decades futilely panning for gold, Schieffelin led an epic life of wealth and adventure. In Portrait of a Prospector, historian R. Bruce Craig pieces together the colorful memoirs and oral histories of this singular individual to tell Schieffelin's story in his own words. Craig places the prospector's family background and times into context in an engaging introduction, then opens Schieffelin's story with the frontiersman's accounts of his first prospecting attempts at ten years old, his flight from home at twelve to search for gold, and his initial wanderings in California, Nevada, and Utah. In direct, unsentimental prose, Schieffelin describes his expedition into Arizona Territory, where army scouts assured him that he "would find no rock . . . but his own tombstone." Unlike many prospectors who simply panned for gold, Schieffelin took on wealthy partners who invested the enormous funds needed for hard rock mining. He and his co-investors in the Tombstone claim became millionaires. Restless in his newfound life of wealth and leisure, Schieffelin soon returned to exploration. Upon his early death in Oregon he left behind a new strike, the location of which remains a mystery. Collecting the words of an exceptional figure who embodied the western frontier, Craig offers readers insight into the mentality of prospector-adventurers during an age of discovery and of limitless potential. 12 black-and-white Illustrations, 1 map, Paperback,136 pages, 6" x 9." R. Bruce Craig is an independent historian and biographer. He is the author of Treasonable Doubt: The Harry Dexter White Spy Case and The Apprenticeship of Alger Hiss. Craig lives in Canada, where he teaches American History at the University of Prince Edward Island. "The historical significance of Ed Schieffelin's life goes well beyond his Tombstone silver discovery, as demonstrated in this compelling autobiography, expertly edited and annotated by R. Bruce Craig."—Robert M. Utley, author of A Life Wild and Perilous: Mountain Men and the Paths to the Pacific "Portrait of a Prospector engagingly illuminates the life of a particular U.S. frontier type, the gold and silver prospector of the late nineteenth century West, and adds to our understanding of the prospecting culture of the era. Ed Schieffelin's account is particularly revealing as the story of a man who started prospecting at ten years old and did not stop until his death, a man who learned to go his own way rather than follow the rushes."—Paula Mitchell Marks, author of Precious Dust: The North American Gold Rush Era, 1848-1900 
Price: 18.95 USD
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360 SCHLISSEL, LILLIAN. Women's Diaries Of The Westward Journey.
Schocken Books, New York: 1982. 0805207473 / 9780805207477 s Softcover. Good condition. 
More than a quarter of a million Americans cfrossed the continental United States between 1840 and 1870 in one of the greatest migrations of modern times. The men of the rugged frontier have become an integral part of American history and folklore, but pioneer was, in fact, a family matter, and the westering experiences of American women are central to an accurate picture of what life was like on the frontier. Includes an Index. "Provides a vivid picture of a long-neglected part of American history." - Library Journal 
Price: 5.45 USD
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