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AMERICAN WEST.

AMERICAN WEST.

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381 STOTT, ANNETTE. Pioneer Cemeteries: Sculpture Gardens Of The Old West.
University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln and London: 2008. Facsimile Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
As pioneers attempted to settle and civilize the "Wild West," cemeteries became important cultural centers. Filled with carved wooden headboards, inscribed local stones, and Italian marble statues, cemeteries functioned as symbols of stability and progress toward a European-inspired vision of Manifest Destiny. As repositories of art and history, these pioneer cemeteries tell the story of communities and visual culture emerging together within the developing landscape of the Old West. Annette Stott traces this story through Rocky Mountain towns on the western frontier, from the unkempt "boot hills" of the early mining camps and cattle settlements to the more refined "fair mounts." She shows how people from Asia, Europe, and the Americas contributed to the visual character of the mountain cemeteries, and how the sepulchral garden functioned as an open-air gallery of public sculpture, at once a site for relaxation, learning, and social ritual. Here, widespread participation in a variety of ceremonies brought mountain communities together with a frequency almost unimaginable today. Illustrated with eighty-three striking photographs, this book shows how the pioneer cemetery emerged as a site of public sculpture and cultural transmission in which each carved or molded monument played dual (and sometimes conflicting) public and private roles, recording the community's history and values while memorializing individuals and events. Annette Stott is the director of the School of Art and Art History and a professor of art history at the University of Denver. She is the author of Holland Mania: The Unknown Dutch Period in American Art and Culture. "A moving reminder of the sheer transitory nature of American life."—Thomas McGonigle, ABC of Reading 2009 Colorado Book Awards, history category, finalist. Publication of this book has been aided by a grant from the Wyeth Foundation for American Art Publication Fund of the College Art Association, as well as a grant from the Walter S. Rosenberry III Fund at the University of Denver. 
Price: 35.10 USD
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382 STRONG, LISA. Sentimental Journey: The Art Of Alfred Jacob Miller.
Amon Carter Museum / University oif Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2008. 0883601052 / 9780883601051 h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
A groundbreaking study of the first western artist to journey into the heart of the Rockies. Alfred Jacob Miller (1810-1874) was the first artist to journey into the heart of the Rocky Mountains. He did so as the commissioned expedition artist for William Drummond Stewart (1795-1871), a Scottish nobleman and veteran of a five-year hunting tour in America. Their destination would be the annual fur traders' rendezvous at Horse Creek, near the present-day border of Colorado and Wyoming. Miller, Stewart, and the rest of their party departed from Independence, Missouri, in mid-May 1837. They arrived at the rendezvous two months later and, after a week among the trappers and traders, headed into the Wind River Mountains to the source of the Green River. There, they spent the waning summer hunting moose and elk before returning to St. Louis in early October. Miller executed some one hundred watercolor and pen-and-ink sketches during the expedition, and he later reworked them into finished watercolors and oils for a variety of patrons. Over the past two decades, much valuable scholarship has emerged on how western American art has reflected American nationalist or expansionist ideologies. In Sentimental Journey: The Art of Alfred Jacob Miller, Lisa Strong takes a new approach, however, by examining how Miller tailored his western scenes to suit the specific needs and interests of local American audiences. She also crosses national boundaries to explore how Miller's paintings helped promote a vision of Scottish aristocratic identity. Lisa Strong holds a Ph.D. in Art History from Columbia University. An independent scholar and author, Strong served as guest curator of the Amon Carter Museum exhibition Sentimental Journey: The Art of Alfred Jacob Miller (2008). "An outstanding achievement. Strong's book is a major contribution to studies not just of western art but American art in general. "—Alex Nemerov, Professor of the History of Art, Yale University "Sentimental Journey will set a new scholarly standard for monographs on western art."—William H. Truettner, Senior Curator at the Smithsonian American Art Museum 
Price: 42.51 USD
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383 STRUTIN, MICHAL. Places Of Grace: The Natural Landscapes Of The American Midwest.
University of Illinois Press, Urbana: 1999. 0252023234 / 9780252023231 h Hardcover with dustjacket. Very good condition. 

Price: 51.78 USD
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384 SUNDER, JOHN E. Bill Sublette: Mountain Man.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2003. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
William Lewis Sublette, better known to Americans of the second quarter of the nineteenth century as Bill, was of that choice handful of heroes who made the early western fur trade what it was—an occupation for men unafraid of danger. 
Price: 18.95 USD
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385 SWENSEN, JAMES R. Picturing Migrants: The Grapes Of Wrath And New Deal Documentary Photography.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2015. Volume 18 in Charles M. Russell Center Series on Art and Photography of the American West. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
As time passes, personal memories of the Great Depression die with those who lived through the desperate 1930s. In the absence of firsthand knowledge, John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath and the photographs produced for the New Deal's Farm Security Administration (FSA) now provide most of the images that come to mind when we think of the 1930s. That novel and those photographs, as this book shows, share a history. Fully exploring this complex connection for the first time, Picturing Migrants offers new insight into Steinbeck's novel and the FSA's photography—and into the circumstances that have made them enduring icons of the Depression. Looking at the work of Dorothea Lange, Horace Bristol, Arthur Rothstein, and Russell Lee, it is easy to imagine that these images came straight out of the pages of The Grapes of Wrath. This should be no surprise, James R. Swensen tells us, because Steinbeck explicitly turned to photographs of the period to create his visceral narrative of hope and loss among Okie migrants in search of a better life in California. When the novel became an instant best seller upon its release in April 1939, some dismissed its imagery as pure fantasy. Lee knew better and traveled to Oklahoma for proof. The documentary pictures he produced are nothing short of a photographic illustration of the hard lives and desperate reality that Steinbeck so vividly portrayed. In Picturing Migrants, Swensen sets these lesser-known images alongside the more familiar work of Lange and others, giving us a clearer understanding of the FSA's work to publicize the plight of the migrant in the wake of the novel and John Ford's award-winning film adaptation. A new perspective on an era whose hardships and lessons resonate to this day, Picturing Migrants lets us see as never before how a novel and a series of documentary photographs have kept the Great Depression unforgettably real for generation after generation. 207 black-and-white Illustrations. James R. Swensen is Assistant Professor of Art History and the History of Photography at Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah. "Swensen's holistic and groundbreaking study is a fascinating and scrupulously researched account of how several FSA photographers and John Steinbeck worked in sync, 'walking in each other's paths.' Those converging roads make for a fascinating story, one never told in such detail as Swensen captures in this book. He weaves both familiar and unfamiliar stories together in the most comprehensive study to date of the interplay between Steinbeck's fictional Joads and their historic counterparts. "—Susan Shillinglaw, author of On Reading The Grapes of Wrath 
Price: 33.20 USD
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386 TANNER, KAREN H. Doc Holliday: A Family Portrait.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2001. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
John H. Holliday, D.D.S., better known as Doc Holliday, has become a legendary figure in the history of the American West. In Doc Holliday: A Family Portrait, Karen Holliday Tanner reveals the real man behind the legend. Shedding light on Holliday's early years, in a prominent Georgia family during the Civil War and Reconstruction, she examines the elements that shaped his destiny: his birth defect, the death of his mother and estrangement from his father, and the diagnosis of tuberculosis, which led to his journey west. The influence of Holliday's genteel upbringing never disappeared, but it was increasingly overshadowed by his emerging western personality. Holliday himself nurtured his image as a frontier gambler and gunman. Using previously undisclosed family documents and reminiscences as well as other primary sources, Tanner documents the true story of Doc's friendship with the Earp brothers and his run-ins with the law, including the climactic shootout at the O. K. Corral and its aftermath. This first authoritative biography of Doc Holliday should appeal both to historians of the West and to general readers who are interested in his poignant story. "Doc Holliday: A Family Portrait will be considered the definitive Holliday biography and will supplant all previously published works on the man's life as a complete and authoritative account. This book will undoubtedly take a place among the foremost books in the Western gunfighter genre." - Robert K. DeArment, author of Alias Frank Canton 
Price: 18.95 USD
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387 TANNER, KAREN HOLLIDAY & TANNER, JOHN D. The Bronco Bill Gang.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2011. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
How a Texas cowboy came to lead a band of outlaws who menaced the frontier Southwest. The short, bloody career of "Bronco Bill" Walters and his gang captures the devil-may-care violence of the Wild West. In this detailed narrative of the gang's crime spree in territorial New Mexico and Arizona, two experts in outlaw history offer a gunshot-by-gunshot account of how some especially dangerous outlaws plied their trade in 1898. William Walters reached New Mexico Territory from Texas in the late 1880s and quickly gained a reputation for his ability to sit a horse and for his violent ways. The Bronco Bill Gang skillfully dissects his propensity for trouble and shows how he soon found himself in the territorial penitentiary. In the spring of 1898, after a sojourn stealing horses in Arizona, Walters and four apprentice outlaws turned to armed robbery, holding up passenger trains on the Santa Fe Railroad in Grants and Beln, New Mexico. By the time a Wells Fargo posse captured Bronco Bill, two of the outlaws, two deputies, and a Navajo tracker had been killed in gunfights. Anyone with a taste for western history or an interest in New Mexico and Arizona in the bad old days will find this book irresistible. The authors' attention to the ways Bill and his men fell into a life of crime shows us the real West, where cowboys and gunmen could wind up on either side of the law. The Bronco Bill Gang is the first book to explore this fabled band of outlaws who crisscrossed the American Southwest. Karen Holliday Tanner is the author of Doc Holliday: A Family Portrait. John D. Tanner is Professor Emeritus of History at Palomar College, San Marcos, California. Both are recipients of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Wild West History Association. "An information-packed, good old narrative piece of history." — Roger D.McGrath, author of Gunfighters, Highwaymen, and Vigilantes: Violence on the Frontier 
Price: 29.40 USD
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388 TATE, MICHAEL L. WITH CONTRIBUTIONS BY KERIN TATE, WILL BAGLEY, & RICHARD RIECK. The Great Medicine Road, Part 3: Narratives Of The Oregon, California, And Mormon Trails, 1850-1855.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2017. Volume 24 in American Trails. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
In the years after the discovery of gold in California, thousands of fortune seekers made their way west, joining the greatest mass migration in American history. The gold fields were only one destination, as emigrants pushed across the Great Plains, Great Basin, and Oregon Territory in unprecedented numbers, following the Oregon, California, and Mormon Trails to the verdant Willamette Valley or Mormon settlements in the Salt Lake Valley. "Seeing the Elephant" they often called the journey, referring to the wondrous sights and endless adventures met along the way. The firsthand accounts of those who made the trip between 1850 and 1855 that are collected in this third volume in a four-part series speak of wonders and adventures, but also of disaster and deprivation. Traversing the ever-changing landscape, these pioneers braved flooded rivers, endured cholera and hunger, and had encounters with Indians that were often friendly and sometimes troubled. Rich in detail and diverse in the experiences they relate, these letters, diary excerpts, recollections, and reports capture the voices of women and men of all ages and circumstances, hailing from states far and wide, and heading west in hope and desperation. Their words allow us to see the grit and glory of the American West as it once appeared to those who witnessed its transformation. Michael L. Tate begins the volume with an introduction to this middle phase of the trails' history. A headnote and annotations for each document sketch the author's background and reasons for undertaking the trip and correct and clarify information in the original manuscript. The extensive bibliography identifies sources and suggests further reading. 19 black-and-white Illustrations, 4 maps, Hardcover, 312 pages, 6.125" x 9.25". 
Price: 43.70 USD
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389 TATE, MICHAEL L. (EDITOR) WITH BAGLEY, WILL & RIECK, RICHARD. The Great Medicine Road, Part 1: Narratives Of The Oregon, California, And Mormon Trails, 1840-1848.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2014. Volume 24 in American Trails. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Between 1841 and 1866, more than 500,000 people followed trails to Oregon, California, and the Salt Lake Valley in one of the greatest mass migrations in American history. This collection of travelers' accounts of their journeys in the 1840s, the first volume in a new series of trail narratives, comprises excerpts from pioneer and missionary letters, diaries, journals, and memoirs—many previously unpublished—accompanied by biographical information and historical background. Beginning with Father Pierre-Jean de Smet's letters relating his encounters with Plains Indians, and ending with an account of a Mormon gold miner's journey from California to Salt Lake City, these narratives tell varied and vivid stories. Some travelers fled hard times: religious persecution, the collapse of the agricultural economy, illness, or unpredictable weather. Others looked ahead, attracted by California gold, the verdant Willamette Valley of Oregon, or the prospect of converting Native people to Christianity. Although many welcomed the adventure and adjusted to the rigors of trail life, others complained in their accounts of difficulty adapting. Remembrances of the Oregon, California, and Mormon Trails have yielded some of the most iconic images in American history. This and forthcoming volumes in The Great Medicine Road series present the pioneer spirit of the original overlanders supported by the rich scholarship of the past century and a half. 26 black and white illustrations, 4 maps. Michael L. Tate is Chair of Graduate Studies and Professor of History and Native American Studies at the University of Nebraska, Omaha, and author of Indians and Emigrants: Encounters on the Overland Trails. Will Bagley is an independent historian who has written about overland emigration, frontier violence, railroads, mining, and the Mormons. Bagley has published extensively over the years and is the author and editor of many books, articles, and reviews in professional journals. Bagley is the series editor of Arthur H. Clark Company's documentary history series, KINGDOM IN THE WEST: The Mormons and the American Frontier. Bagley has been a Wallace Stegner Centennial Fellow at the University of Utah and the Archibald Hannah, Jr. Fellow in American History at Yale University's Beinecke Library. Blood of the Prophets: Brigham Young and the Massacre at Mountain Meadows has won numerous awards including a Spur Award from Western Writers of America, the Bancroft History Prize from the Denver Public Library, Westerners International Best Book, and the Western History Association Caughey Book Prize for the most distinguished book on the history of the American West. So Rugged and Mountainous: Blazing the Trails to Oregon and California, 1812-1848 is the first of four volumes of "Overland West: The Story of the Oregon and California Trails". Richard Rieck is Professor Emeritus of Geography at Western Illinois University. An active member of the Oregon-California Trails Association, he has published a number of articles on the northern overland trail routes and transcribed several trail-related documents for publication. Currently, he is completing a book manuscript tentatively titled, "Deaths along the Oregon, California, and Mormon Trails, 1841-1865." 
Price: 37.95 USD
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390 TATE, MICHAEL L. (EDITOR) WITH BAGLEY, WILL & RIECK, RICHARD. The Great Medicine Road, Part 2: Narratives Of The Oregon, California, And Mormon Trails, 1849.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2015. Volume 24 in American Trails. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
During the early weeks of 1848, as U.S. congressmen debated the territorial status of California, a Swiss immigrant and an itinerant millwright forever altered the future state's fate. Building a sawmill for Johann August Sutter, James Wilson Marshall struck gold. The rest may be history, but much of the story of what happened in the following year is told not in history books but in the letters, diaries, journals, and other written recollections of those whom the California gold rush drew west. In this second installment in the projected four-part collection The Great Medicine Road: Narratives of the Oregon, California, and Mormon Trails, the hardy souls who made the arduous trip tell their stories in their own words. Seven individuals' tales bring to life a long-ago year that enriched some, impoverished others, and forever changed the face of North America. Responding to often misleading promotional literature, adventurers made their way west via different routes. Following the Carson River through the Sierra Nevada, or taking the Lassen Route to the Sacramento Valley, they passed through the Mormon Zion of Great Salt Lake City and traded with and often displaced Native Americans long familiar with the trails. Their accounts detail these encounters, as well as the gritty realities of everyday life on the overland trails. They narrate events, describe the vast and diverse landscapes they pass through, and document a journey as strange and new to them as it is to many readers today. Through these travelers' diaries and memoirs, readers can relive a critical moment in the remaking of the West—and appreciate what a difference one year can make in the life of a nation. 15 black & white illustrations, 4 maps. Michael L. Tate is Chair of Graduate Studies and Professor of History and Native American Studies at the University of Nebraska, Omaha, and author of Indians and Emigrants: Encounters on the Overland Trails. Will Bagley Will Bagley Will Bagley is an independent historian who has written about overland emigration, frontier violence, railroads, mining, and the Mormons. Bagley has published extensively over the years and is the author and editor of many books, articles, and reviews in professional journals. Bagley is the series editor of Arthur H. Clark Company's documentary history series, KINGDOM IN THE WEST: The Mormons and the American Frontier. Bagley has been a Wallace Stegner Centennial Fellow at the University of Utah and the Archibald Hannah, Jr. Fellow in American History at Yale University's Beinecke Library. Blood of the Prophets: Brigham Young and the Massacre at Mountain Meadows has won numerous awards including a Spur Award from Western Writers of America, the Bancroft History Prize from the Denver Public Library, Westerners International Best Book, and the Western History Association Caughey Book Prize for the most distinguished book on the history of the American West. So Rugged and Mountainous: Blazing the Trails to Oregon and California, 1812-1848 is the first of four volumes of "Overland West: The Story of the Oregon and California Trails". Richard Rieck is Professor Emeritus of Geography at Western Illinois University. An active member of the Oregon-California Trails Association, he has published a number of articles on the northern overland trail routes and transcribed several trail-related documents for publication. Currently, he is completing a book manuscript tentatively titled, "Deaths along the Oregon, California, and Mormon Trails, 1841-1865." Will Bagley is an independent historian who has written about overland emigration, frontier violence, railroads, mining, and the Mormons. Bagley has published extensively over the years and is the author and editor of many books, articles, and reviews in professional journals. Bagley is the series editor of Arthur H. Clark Company's documentary history series, KINGDOM IN THE WEST: The Mormons and the American Frontier. Bagley has been a Wallace Stegner Centennial Fellow at the University of Utah and the Archibald Hannah, Jr. Fellow in American History at Yale University's Beinecke Library. Blood of the Prophets: Brigham Young and the Massacre at Mountain Meadows has won numerous awards including a Spur Award from Western Writers of America, the Bancroft History Prize from the Denver Public Library, Westerners International Best Book, and the Western History Association Caughey Book Prize for the most distinguished book on the history of the American West. So Rugged and Mountainous: Blazing the Trails to Oregon and California, 1812-1848 is the first of four volumes of "Overland West: The Story of the Oregon and California Trails". Richard Rieck is Professor Emeritus of Geography at Western Illinois University. An active member of the Oregon-California Trails Association, he has published a number of articles on the northern overland trail routes and transcribed several trail-related documents for publication. Currently, he is completing a book manuscript tentatively titled, "Deaths along the Oregon, California, and Mormon Trails, 1841-1865." Will Bagley is an independent historian who has written about overland emigration, frontier violence, railroads, mining, and the Mormons. Bagley has published extensively over the years and is the author and editor of many books, articles, and reviews in professional journals. Bagley is the series editor of Arthur H. Clark Company's documentary history series, KINGDOM IN THE WEST: The Mormons and the American Frontier. Bagley has been a Wallace Stegner Centennial Fellow at the University of Utah and the Archibald Hannah, Jr. Fellow in American History at Yale University's Beinecke Library. Blood of the Prophets: Brigham Young and the Massacre at Mountain Meadows has won numerous awards including a Spur Award from Western Writers of America, the Bancroft History Prize from the Denver Public Library, Westerners International Best Book, and the Western History Association Caughey Book Prize for the most distinguished book on the history of the American West. So Rugged and Mountainous: Blazing the Trails to Oregon and California, 1812-1848 is the first of four volumes of "Overland West: The Story of the Oregon and California Trails". Richard Rieck is Professor Emeritus of Geography at Western Illinois University. An active member of the Oregon-California Trails Association, he has published a number of articles on the northern overland trail routes and transcribed several trail-related documents for publication. Currently, he is completing a book manuscript tentatively titled, "Deaths along the Oregon, California, and Mormon Trails, 1841-1865." Will Bagley is an independent historian who has written about overland emigration, frontier violence, railroads, mining, and the Mormons. Bagley has published extensively over the years and is the author and editor of many books, articles, and reviews in professional journals. Bagley is the series editor of Arthur H. Clark Company's documentary history series, KINGDOM IN THE WEST: The Mormons and the American Frontier. Bagley has been a Wallace Stegner Centennial Fellow at the University of Utah and the Archibald Hannah, Jr. Fellow in American History at Yale University's Beinecke Library. Blood of the Prophets: Brigham Young and the Massacre at Mountain Meadows has won numerous awards including a Spur Award from Western Writers of America, the Bancroft History Prize from the Denver Public Library, Westerners International Best Book, and the Western History Association Caughey Book Prize for the most distinguished book on the history of the American West. So Rugged and Mountainous: Blazing the Trails to Oregon and California, 1812-1848 is the first of four volumes of "Overland West: The Story of the Oregon and California Trails". Richard Rieck is Professor Emeritus of Geography at Western Illinois University. An active member of the Oregon-California Trails Association, he has published a number of articles on the northern overland trail routes and transcribed several trail-related documents for publication. Currently, he is completing a book manuscript tentatively titled, "Deaths along the Oregon, California, and Mormon Trails, 1841-1865." 
Price: 38.19 USD
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391 THOMAS, GEORGE. Lewis And Clark Trail: The Photo Journal.
Pictorial Histories Publishing, Missoula. 097059920X / 9780970599209 s Softcover. Brand new book. 
If Lewis and Clark had had the good fortune to document their amazing journey with photographs, these are the scenes that would have been recorded. 195 full-color photos, maps. 
Price: 18.95 USD
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392 TOWNSHEND, SAMUEL NUGENT; ALEX HUNT & KRISTIN LLOYD (EDITORS); JOHN GEORGE HYDE (PHOTOGRAPHY). Our Indian Summer In The Far West: An Autumn Tour Of Fifteen Thousand Miles In Kansas, Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, And The Indian Territory.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2016. Volume 25 in Charles M. Russell Center Series on Art and Photography of the American West. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
In 1879 two Englishmen, writer Samuel Nugent Townshend and photographer John George Hyde, set out for a pleasant Indian summer on a tour of the American West. The duo documented their travels by steamship and train, through Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and Chicago, across the Missouri to the "new state of Kansas" and the beginning of the western lands and business opportunities that were to become the focus of their narrative. Reprinted here with critical notes and introduction, Our Indian Summer in the Far West offers an enlightening—and often entertaining—perspective on an early moment in the growth of capitalism and industry in the American West. Originally published as a photographic travelogue and guide to British investment in the American West, Townshend and Hyde's account is both idiosyncratic and emblematic of its time. Interested in the West's economic and environmental potential, the two men focused on farming in Kansas, railroads and mining in Colorado, a bear hunt in New Mexico, and ranching in Texas. The sojourners' own foibles also enter the narrative: alerted to the difficulty of finding a hotel with a bath, the two Victorians took along a portable bathtub made of India rubber. Their words and pictures speak volumes about contemporary attitudes toward race, empire, and the future of civilization. An introduction by coeditor Alex Hunt provides background on the creators and the travelogue genre. The recovery and republication of this extremely rare volume, an artifact of the Victorian American West, make available an important primary document of a brief but pivotal historical moment connecting the American West and the British Empire. 65 Color Illustrations, 1 map, 200 pages, 11" x 11". 
Price: 43.70 USD
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393 TRAUGOTT, JOSEPH. Sole Mates: Cowboy Boots And Art.
Museum of New Mexico Press, Santa Fe in association with the New Mexico Museum of Art: 2010. s Faux Leather Clothbound. Brand new book. 
A lively examination of cowboy boots as popular icons of western American culture, along with masterpiece in trentieth century art that depict Western America. Included is artwork by Barbara Van Cleve, Frederick Hammersley, Luis A. Jimenez Jr., Bruce Nauman, and others. 96 coloe and 70 black-and-white photographs. 
Price: 33.20 USD
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394 TRIMBLE, STEPHEN. The Sagebrush Ocean: A Natural History Of The Great Basin, 10th Anniversary Edition.
University of Nevada Press, Reno: 1999. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Noted writer and photographer Stephen Trimble mixes eloquent accounts of personal experiences with clear explication of natural history. His photographs capture some of the most spectacular but least-known scenery in the western states. The Great Basin Desert sweeps from the Sierra to the Rockies, from the Snake River Plain to the Mojave Desert. "Biogeography" would be one way to sum up Trimble's focus on the land: what lives where, and why. He introduces concepts of desert ecology and discusses living communities of animals and plants that band Great Basin mountains—from the exhilarating emptiness of dry lake-beds to alpine regions at the summits of the 13,000-foot Basin ranges. This is the best general introduction to the ecology and spirit of the Great Basin, a place where "the desert almost seems to mirror the sky in size," where mountains hold "ravens, bristlecone pines, winter stillness—and unseen, but satisfying, the possibility of bighorn sheep." Trimble's photographs come from the backcountry of this rugged land, from months of exploring and hiking the Great Basin wilderness in all seasons; and his well-chosen words come from a rare intimacy with the West. Stephen Trimble was born in Denver, his family's base for roaming the West with his geologist father. After a liberal arts education at Colorado College, he worked as a park ranger in Colorado and Utah, earned a master's degree in ecology at the University of Arizona, served as director of the Museum of Northern Arizona Press, and for five years lived near Santa Fe, New Mexico. He has been a full-time free-lance writer and photographer since 1981. "The Sagebrush Ocean is one beauty of a book, a triumph of regional literature of the kind we need, to relate more closely to his land of ours." —Harold Gilliam, The San Francisco Chronicle "This seemingly harsh, but actually beautiful—and fragile—landscape cannot even be seen, much less appreciated, at seventy miles per hour. You have to dismount your Ford and investigate it on foot. If you cannot do so, Trimble's survey is the next best thing. His writing style is first-person informal (almost conversational), but informed." —Richard Dillon, True West "Books as well written, well researched, and nicely photographed as this one are a rare commodity in the expanding literary genre of Western natural history. What Stephen Trimble and the University of Nevada Press have combined to produce here is a single package that fits well in all these categories." —Dan Flores, Department of History, University of Montana, Missoula Contents "The Great Basin is one of the least novelized, least painted, least eulogized of American landscapes. Stephen Trimble has opened it up with the perception of a frontier scout, but for a different set of people this time: people more eager to know than to possess, more eager to understand than utilize." —Barry Lopez, from the foreword 
Price: 37.95 USD
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395 TUBBS, STEPHENIE AMBROSE. Why Sacagawea Deserves The Day Off And Other Lessons From The Lewis And Clark Trail.
University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln: 2008. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
More than two hundred years later, the "voyage of discovery"—with its outsized characters, geographic marvels, and wondrous moments of adventure and mystery—continues to draw us along the Lewis and Clark Trail. Stephenie Ambrose Tubbs first fell under the trail's spell at sixteen and has been following in Lewis and Clark's path ever since. In essays historical and personal, she revisits the Lewis and Clark Trail and its famous people, landmarks, and events, exploring questions the expedition continues to raise, such as, What really motivated Thomas Jefferson to send out his agents of discovery? What "mutinous expressions" were uttered? What happened to the dog? Why did Meriwether Lewis end his own life? In the resulting trip through history, Tubbs recounts her travels along the trail by foot, Volkswagen bus, and canoe—at every turn renewing the American experience inscribed by Lewis and Clark. Stephenie Ambrose Tubbs serves on the board of directors for the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center Foundation, the Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation, and the American Prairie Foundation. She is the coauthor of The Lewis and Clark Companion: An Encyclopedic Guide to the Voyage of Discovery. "For Lewis and Clark aficionados, this little volume should find a place on their bookshelves."—Publishers Weekly "A candid and enlightening assessment of the landmark Corps of Discovery."—Deborah Donovan, Booklist "For Stephenie Ambrose Tubbs, the Lewis and Clark expedition is not just a historical story; it's personal, too, intertwined with her father's and family's lives. In this book, she brings her own experiences on the trail—and especially her own passions and insights—to bear on the Corps of Discovery. Reading it is like having a lively conversation across an open campfire."—Dayton Duncan, author of Out West: A Journey through Lewis and Clark's America "Lively, engaging, and well informed, here is the guide through the journals of Lewis and Clark and along the trail with the Corps of Discovery that will keep you laughing, arguing, and pondering. Stephenie Ambrose Tubbs provides delightful insights for her readers on this journey."—Clyde A. Milner II, editor of A New Significance: Re-envisioning the History of the American West and co-editor of The Oxford History of the American West "Stephenie Ambrose Tubbs broadens and deepens our understanding of events and personalities more than two centuries old. Even more importantly, she makes fresh connections to the moral lessons we urgently need to draw from them today."—Landon Jones, author of William Clark and the Shaping of the West 
Price: 18.00 USD
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396 TURNER, STEVE. Amber Waves And Undertow: Peril, Hope, Sweat, And Downright Nonchalance In Dry Wheat Country.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2009. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Tales of the transformation of rural America. Adams County, Washington, is home to farmlands on the Columbia Plateau that produce more crops than might be expected of its semiarid soils. But while unique in its geography and history, it also faces many of the problems confronting farmers throughout rural America. Seasoned journalist Steve Turner, having spent time in Adams County as a young harvest hand, returned to the region to portray farm life and history in a land where change is a subtle but powerful constant. Amber Waves and Undertow interweaves family narratives, historical episodes, and Turner's own experiences to illuminate the transformation of rural America from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century. Whether distilling the lore of wheat and potato agriculture or describing action at a combine demolition derby, Turner celebrates both the usual and the unusual among the local residents. He blends stories of pioneer settlers with vignettes of present-day life, introducing readers to the characters—the hardworking and the eccentric, the old-timers and the Latino newcomers—who populate this corner of America. In the mode of John McPhee and Wendell Berry, Turner's lyrical prose conveys his affection for both the land and its inhabitants. Amber Waves and Undertow is a thoughtful depiction of an exceptional place that puts the difficulties of individual farmers in national and global contexts, showing us that only by understanding the past of rural America can we confront its future challenges. Steve Turner has written feature articles for the Boston Globe, Le Figaro, The New York Times, Washington Post, San Francisco Examiner, San Jose Mercury News, Year Books of the Colliers and Encarta encyclopedias among many others. He currently resides in Santa Cruz, California. 
Price: 18.95 USD
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397 UTLEY, ROBERT M. (EDITOR). An Army Doctor On The Western Frontier: Journals And Letters Of John Vance Lauderdale, 1864-1890.
University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque: 2014. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Assigned to the District of Utah during the Civil War, physician John Vance Lauderdale spent the next twenty-five years on army posts in the American West, serving in California, Arizona, New Mexico, South Dakota, and Texas. Throughout his career he kept a detailed journal and sent long letters home to his sister in upstate New York. This selection of Lauderdale's writings, edited and annotated by a premier historian of the American West, offers an insightful account of army life that will teach readers much about the settlement and growth of the West in a time of rapid change. Lauderdale's observations are keen and critical. He writes about fellow officers, his army superiors, the civilians and American Indians he encountered, life on officers' row, and the day-to-day functioning of the army medical service. Particularly valuable are his insights into military interactions with local communities of Mormons, American Indians, and Hispanos. 6 x 9 in. 208 pages 34 halftones, 6 maps. Robert M. Utley, formerly the chief historian of the National Park Service, is the author of seventeen distinguished books on the history of the American West, most recently Geronimo. 
Price: 28.69 USD
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398 VARLEY, MOLLY K. Americans Recaptured: Progressive Era Memory Of Frontier Captivity.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2014. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
It was on the frontier, where "civilized" men and women confronted the "wilderness," that Europeans first became Americans—or so authorities from Frederick Jackson Turner to Theodore Roosevelt claimed. But as the frontier disappeared, Americans believed they needed a new mechanism for fixing their collective identity; and they found it, historian Molly K. Varley suggests, in tales of white Americans held captive by Indians. For Americans in the Progressive Era (1890-1916) these stories of Indian captivity seemed to prove that the violence of national expansion had been justified, that citizens' individual suffering had been heroic, and that settlers' contact with Indians and wilderness still characterized the nation's "soul." Furthermore, in the act of memorializing white Indian captives—through statues, parks, and reissued narratives—small towns found a way of inscribing themselves into the national story. By drawing out the connections between actual captivity, captivity narratives, and the memorializing of white captives, Varley shows how Indian captivity became a means for Progressive Era Americans to look forward by looking back. Local boosters and cultural commentators used Indian captivity to define "Americanism" and to renew those frontier qualities deemed vital to the survival of the nation in the post-frontier world, such as individualism, bravery, ingenuity, enthusiasm, "manliness," and patriotism. In Varley's analysis of the Progressive Era mentality, contact between white captives and Indians represented a stage in the evolution of a new American people and affirmed the contemporary notion of America as a melting pot. Revealing how the recitation and interpretation of these captivity narratives changed over time—with shifting emphasis on brutality, gender, and ethnographic and historical accuracy—Americans Recaptured shows that tales of Indian captivity were no more fixed than American identity, but were consistently used to give that identity its own useful, ever-evolving shape. Molly K. Varley holds a Ph.D. in history from the University of Montana. She lives in Raleigh, North Carolina. 
Price: 33.20 USD
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399 VICTOR, FRANCES FULLER; GREENE, JEROME A (INTRODUCTION). Our Centennial Indian War And The Life Of General Custer.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2011. Volume 68 in Western Frontier Library. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
The first book published on the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Lieutenant Colonel George A. Custer was widely known as a Civil War figure, author, and successful cavalry leader before his spectacular defeat at the Battle of the Little Bighorn in 1876 by Lakota and Northern Cheyenne Indians. His actions—and those of his troops—would have been of public interest even without their final, bloody outcome. A ready audience of readers was hungry for information about the engagement and about their fallen hero when Frances Fuller Victor's book appeared in spring 1877. Published even before the Great Sioux War had ended, Our Centennial Indian War and the Life of General Custer was the first contemporary and comprehensive account of the successive army operations in 1876 and early 1877. It was a major accomplishment. Victor drew information from a wide range of sources—including personal letters, war correspondents' dispatches, and government documents—to explain the lengthy, disjointed struggle between the army and the Lakota-Cheyenne coalition. She also offered one of the earliest biographical assessments of Custer, its most noted military participant. Compared to other period writings, Victor's narrative is smooth and dispassionate, devoid of conjecture and judgment. In addition, her account contains rare Indian perspectives on the Little Bighorn battle, including Lakota testimony that has not previously appeared elsewhere. Featuring an introduction by historian Jerome A. Greene, this edition of Our Centennial Indian War provides a remarkable window into contemporary thinking about an iconic event. Frances Fuller Victor (1826-1902) was a writer and historian who wrote prolifically, and sometimes without due acknowledgment, on the history of the American West, especially the Pacific Northwest. Jerome A. Greene is retired as Research Historian for the National Park Service. He is the author of numerous books, including Stricken Field: The Little Bighorn since 1876, Battles and Skirmishes of the Great Sioux War, 1876-1877: The Military View; Lakota and Cheyenne: Indian Views of the Great Sioux War, 1876-1877; and Morning Star Dawn: The Powder River Expedition and the Northern Cheyennes, 1876, all published by the University of Oklahoma Press. 
Price: 28.45 USD
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400 VILLARREAL, MARY ANN. Listening To Rosita: The Business Of Tejana Music And Culture, 1930-1955.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2015. Volume 9 in Race and Culture in the American West. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Everybody in the bar had to drop a quarter in the jukebox or be shamed by "Momo" Villarreal. It wasn't about the money, Mary Ann Villarreal's grandmother insisted. It was about the music—more songs for all the patrons of the Pecan Lounge in Tivoli, Texas. But for Mary Ann, whose schoolbooks those quarters bought, the money didn't hurt. When as an adult Villarreal began to wonder how the few recordings of women singers made their way into that jukebox, questions about the money seemed inseparable from those about the music. In Listening to Rosita, Villarreal seeks answers by pursuing the story of a small group of Tejana singers and entrepreneurs in Corpus Christi, Houston, and San Antonio—the "Texas Triangle"—during the mid-twentieth century. Ultimately she recovers a social world and cultural landscape in central south Texas where Mexican American women negotiated the shifting boundaries of race and economics to assert a public presence. Drawing on oral history, interviews, and insights from ethnic and gender studies, Listening to Rosita provides a counternarrative to previous research on la música tejana, which has focused almost solely on musicians or musical genres. Villarreal instead chronicles women's roles and contributions to the music industry. In spotlighting the sixty-year singing career of San Antonian Rosita Fernandez, the author pulls the curtain back on all the women whose names and stories have been glaringly absent from the ethnic and economic history of Tejana music and culture. In this oral history of the Tejana cantantes who performed and owned businesses in the Texas Triangle, Listening to Rosita shows how ethnic Mexican entrepreneurs developed a unique identity in striving for success in a society that demeaned and segregated them. In telling their story, this book supplies a critical chapter long missing from the history of the West. 7 black-and-white Illustrations, 172 pages, 6" x 9". Mary Ann Villarreal is Director of Strategic Initiatives and University Projects at California State University, Fullerton. Her articles on oral history and the formation of Texas Mexican identity have been published in Oral History Review and the Journal of Women's History. 
Price: 28.45 USD
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