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AMERICAN WEST.

AMERICAN WEST.

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41 BRUST, JAMES S.; POHANKA, BRIAN C. & BARNARD, SANDY. Where Custer Fell: Photographs Of The Little Bighorn Battlefield Then And Now.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2007. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
A stunning photographic record of the Little Bighorn. The Battle of the Little Bighorn has long held an eminent position among the chronicles of the mythic West. None of the men who rode with Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer to his "Last Stand" survived to tell the tale, but this stunning photography book provides a view of the battlefield as it must have existed in 1876. To create Where Custer Fell, authors James S. Brust, Brian C. Pohanka, and Sandy Barnard searched for elusive documents and photographs, made countless trips to the battlefield, and scrutinized all available sources. Each chapter begins with a concise, lively description of an episode in the battle. The narratives are graphically illustrated by historical photos, which are presented alongside modern photos of the same location on the battlefield. The book also features detailed maps and photographs of battle participants and the early photographers who attempted to tell their story. James S. Brust, M.D., a specialist in historical photographs and prints, has published frequently on these topics in journals and magazines. He resides in San Pedro, California. Brian C. Pohanka, who passed away as this book went to press, was a military historian and author of several books. He also was senior researcher, writer, and adviser for Time-Life Books, television documentaries, and feature films. Sandy Barnard is an independent scholar and writer specializing in the Indian wars. He is editor of Greasy Grass and resides in Wake Forest, North Carolina. 
Price: 22.99 USD
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42 BRYAN JR., JIMMY L. The American Elsewhere: Adventure And Manliness In The Age Of Expansion.
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: 2018. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
As important cultural icons of the early nineteenth-century United States, adventurers energized the mythologies of the West and contributed to the justifications of territorial conquest. They told stories of exhilarating perils, boundless landscapes, and erotic encounters that elevated their chauvinism, avarice, and violence into forms of nobility. As self-proclaimed avatars of American exceptionalism, Jimmy L. Bryan Jr. suggests in The American Elsewhere, adventurers transformed westward expansion into a project of romantic nationalism. A study of US expansionism from 1815-1848, The American Elsewhere delves into the "adventurelogues" of the era to reveal the emotional world of men who sought escape from the anonymity of the urban East and pressures of the Market Revolution. As volunteers, trappers, traders, or curiosity seekers, they stepped into "elsewheres," distant and dangerous. With their words and art, they entered these unfamiliar realms that had fostered caution and apprehension, and they reimagined them as regions that awakened romantic and reckless optimism. In doing so, Bryan shows, adventurers created the figure of the remarkable American male that generated a wide appeal and encouraged a personal investment in nationhood among their audiences. Bryan provides a thorough reading of a wide variety of sources—including correspondence, travel accounts, fiction, poetry, artwork, and material culture—and finds that adventurers told stories and shaped images that beguiled a generation of Americans into believing in their own exceptionality and in their destiny to conquer the continent. Jimmy L. Bryan Jr. is associate professor of history at Lamar University. He is the editor of The Martial Imagination: Cultural Aspects of American Warfare and the author of More Zeal Than Discretion: The Westward Adventures of Walter P. Lane. "American Elsewhere guides us through the tortuous and often baleful mental landscapes of American adventurers in the time of Jackson. In chasing the chimera of genuine experience, Bryan's subjects create both a brotherhood of sentiment and geography of racial difference. Bryan's grasp of emotional topographies is masterful. Saddle up and follow his lead."—Daniel Herman, author of Hell on the Range: A Story of Honor, Conscience, and the American West "This book is a compelling investigation of how stories of Western adventurers (explorers, patriot warriors, and men of enterprise) from the end of the War of 1812 to the end of the U.S.-Mexican War romantically redefined the staid conventions of American manhood and thereby promoted a national ethos of manifest destiny. A unique, pivotal study in the cultural history of American exceptionalism and expansionism, it is well researched and plentifully documented, argued with judicious balance and critical discernment, and quite readable."—Michael L. Johnson, author of Hunger for the Wild: America's Obsession with the Untamed West 
Price: 42.75 USD
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43 BRYAN, HOWARD. Wildest Of The West: True Tales Of A Frontier Town On The Santa Fe Trail.
Clear Light Publisher, Santa Fe: 1991. 0940666138 / 9780940666139 First Edition. s Softcover. Good condition. 
According to Charles Bennett writing in New Mexico Magazine, this book "is destined to become compulsory reading for New Mexico history buffs." 
Price: 53.06 USD
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44 BUECKER, THOMAS R. Fort Robinson And The American West, 1900 - 1948.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2003. 0806135344 / 9780806135342 s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Few places provided a more storied backdrop for key events related to the high plains Indian wars than had Fort Robinson, Nebraska. Established in 1874 just south of the Black Hills, Fort Robinson witnessed many of the most dramatic, most tragic encounters between whites and American Indians, including the Cheyenne Outbreak, the death of Crazy Horse, the Ghost Dance, the desperation and diplomacy of such famed Plains Indian leaders as Dull Knife and Red Cloud, and the tragic sequence of events surrounding Wounded Knee. In Fort Robinson and the American West, 1874-1899, Thomas R. Buecker explores both the larger story of the Nebraska fort and the particulars of daily life and work at the fort. Buecker draws on historic reminiscences, government records, reports, correspondence, and other official accounts to render a thorough yet lively depiction. "The academic integrity and fine writing style make this book more than a mere history of a lone military post. Buecker ties Fort Robinson's historical development to events well beyond the narrow geographical confines of the Nebraska Panhandle, connecting the bigger stories with the larger military and political decisions that shaped the development of the northern and central plains. This book offers a sophisticated, reliable, and eminently readable interpretation of crucial military and Indian relations during the height of the fabled Indian wars."--Michael Tate, author of The Frontier Army in the Settlement of the West Thomas R. Buecker is the curator of the Fort Robinson Museum in Crawford, Nebraska. He is the author of more than fifty articles on the history of the West and coeditor of The Crazy Horse Surrender Ledger. 
Price: 18.95 USD
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45 BUELKE, DON. Critter Way.
Stoneydale Press, Stevensville: 2007. 1931291632 / 9781931291637 First Edition. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
In a sequence of colorful and amusing stories relating to his new neighbors, their animals, and the characters in the awesome mountain setting of western Montana's picturesque Bitterroot Valley, author Don Buelke of Victor, Montana, has written a book that literally and metaphorically takes the reader along on the life journey of a young veterinarian thrust by his new practice into a remote and unfamiliar environment. 
Price: 14.20 USD
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46 BURK, DALE A. Dale Burk's Montana.
Stoneydale Press, Stevensville. 193129125X / 9781931291255 h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
An exquisite, full-color book with a vibrant text and stunning color photographs. Dale Burk takes you into the heart and soul of wild Montana ... This is a big, beautiful work with 160 illustrations. 
Price: 28.45 USD
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47 BURK, DALE A.; WEIDENFELLER, DALE A. (FOREWORD). Dale Burk's Montana.
Stoneydale Press, Stevensville: 2002. 1931291241 / 9781931291248 First Edition. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
An exquisite, full-color book with a vibrant text and stunning color photographs. Dale Burk takes you into the heart and soul of wild Montana ... This is a big, beautiful work with 160 illustrations. 
Price: 18.24 USD
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48 BURTON, GABRIELLE. Searching For Tamsen Donner.
University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln: 2009. First Edition. American Lives Series. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Tamsen Donner. For most the name conjures the ill-fated Donner party trapped in the snows of the Sierra Nevada Mountains in 1846-47. Others might know Tamsen as the stoic pioneer woman who saw her children to safety but stayed with her dying husband at the cost of her own life. For Gabrielle Burton, Tamsen's story, fascinating in its own right, had long seemed something more: the story of a woman's life writ large, one whose impossible balancing of self, motherhood, and marriage spoke to Burton's own experience. This book tells of Burton's search to solve the mystery of Tamsen Donner for herself. A graceful mingling of history and memoir, Searching for Tamsen Donner follows Burton and her husband, with their five daughters, on her journey along Tamsen's path. From Tamsen's birthplace in Massachusetts to North Carolina, where she lost her first family in the space of three months; to Illinois, where she married George Donner; and finally to the fateful Oregon Trail, Burton recovers one woman's compelling history through a modern-day family's adventure into realms of ultimately timeless experiences. Here Burton has collected and published together for the first time, all seventeen of Tamsen's known letters. Gabrielle Burton is a writer whose numerous projects include the film Manna from Heaven, which she wrote and produced, and the novel Heartbreak Hotel, which won Scribner's 1985 Maxwell Perkins Prize, an award for a first work of fiction. Her writing has appeared in publications such as The New York Times and The Washington Post. "History lesson, memoir and intimate family portrait all at once, Searching for Tamsen Donner simultaneously re-creates the 1840s and the 1970s, east to west. . . . As dramatic and tragic as the story of the Donner Party is, it shares space here with the tender reflections of a mother of five daughters — daughters whose filial companionship on a summer road trip long ago bespoke a very different kind of family journey across the American West." — William Deverell, Los Angeles Times Book Review "[Searching for Tamsen Donner] is a thoughtful and engaging blend of history and memoir that inspires the reader to delve further into the Donner party's fate, while at the same time enjoying Burton's struggle to be both a full-time mother and successful writer." — Deborah Donovan, Booklist Online "[Burton] succeeds where other historians and biographers have failed in uncovering and publishing here all 17 of Donner's known letters from the journey. . . . Burton's curiosity to speculate and piece together clues as to circumstances surrounding Tamsen's fate . . . drives the narrative forward as if Burton's own perceived vulnerabilities somehow implicate her in the tragedy. It's the book's final uncoupling of these two parallel lives that is Tamsen Donner's legacy to pioneering woman and Burton's literary triumph." — R. D. Pohl, Buffalo News "Searching for Tamsen Donner is audaciously ambitious and utterly original. Gabrielle Burton, back in the day, was one of our country's most dedicated first-wave feminists, mother of five children, and wife to an endlessly tolerant husband. Decades ago, obsessed by the life of Tamsen Donner, Burton bundled the lot of them into a station wagon and retraced that doomed pioneer's footsteps—across our great plains and up into the treacherous mountains, where, with so many of the Donner party, Tamsen met her tragic end. This memoir combines — successfully! — domestic, historic, and mystical concerns that bind together our brave but heartbreakingly fragile nation. It's just a terrific read." — Carolyn See, author of Making a Literary Life "Every great biography requires diligent research, patient investigation, historical accuracy and informed guesses. Searching for Tamsen Donner provides all that and more: Burton candidly identifies which is which. Her own experiences as a woman, a mother, a writer, a wife and a veteran second guesser inform every passage. An original and insightful rendering of a familiar legend, I absolutely loved it."—Mary Kay Blakely, author of Wake Me When It's Over 
Price: 25.60 USD
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49 BUSS, JAMES JOSEPH. Winning The West With Words: Language And Conquest In The Lower Great Lakes.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: . h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Indian Removal was a process both physical and symbolic, accomplished not only at gunpoint but also through language. In the Midwest, white settlers came to speak and write of Indians in the past tense, even though they were still present. Winning the West with Words explores the ways nineteenth-century Anglo-Americans used language, rhetoric, and narrative to claim cultural ownership of the region that comprises present-day Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois. Historian James Joseph Buss borrows from literary studies, geography, and anthropology to examine images of stalwart pioneers and vanished Indians used by American settlers in portraying an empty landscape in which they established farms, towns, and "civilized" governments. He demonstrates how this now-familiar narrative came to replace a more complicated history of cooperation, adaptation, and violence between peoples of different cultures. Buss scrutinizes a wide range of sources—travel journals, captivity narratives, treaty council ceremonies, settler petitions, artistic representations, newspaper editorials, late-nineteenth-century county histories, and public celebrations such as regional fairs and centennial pageants and parades—to show how white Americans used language, metaphor, and imagery to accomplish the symbolic removal of Native peoples from the region south of the Great Lakes. Ultimately, he concludes that the popular image of the white yeoman pioneer was employed to support powerful narratives about westward expansion, American democracy, and unlimited national progress. Buss probes beneath this narrative of conquest to show the ways Indians, far from being passive, participated in shaping historical memory—and often used Anglo-Americans' own words to subvert removal attempts. By grounding his study in place rather than focusing on a single group of people, Buss goes beyond the conventional uses of history, giving readers a new understanding not just of the history of the Midwest but of the power of creation narratives. 
Price: 34.15 USD
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50 BUSWELL, RICHARD S. Close To Home: Photographs.
University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque: 2013. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
For over four decades, Richard Buswell has trained his camera on the landscape of Montana, with its abandoned and overgrown homesteads and majestic, never-ending skies. In the recent work assembled in this volume, Buswell's fourth book, his subjects are much more than scattered remains. His black-and-white photographs frame cast-off, common things to reveal abstract patterns in the tradition of twentieth-century modernist photography. As Buswell puts it, his work is "more interpretive and abstract than it is documentary. The images explore the junction where decaying artifacts become visual echoes of the past." To create a portfolio of images that make us look anew at the West requires a mix of courage and patience, of persistence and imagination. Richard Buswell has shown just these qualities as he has turned a youthful hobby into a powerful means for exploring the past and present of his Montana homeland. 8.5 x 11 inches, 80 pages, 59 duotones. Richard Buswell's photographs have been shown in 39 solo museum exhibitions and included in 230 museum group shows. His photographs are in the permanent collections of more than 200 art museums. Buswell lives in Helena, Montana. 
Price: 28.45 USD
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51 CAMPBELL, JOHN MARTIN; KARSMIZKI, KENNETH W. (INTRODUCTION) Magnificent Failure: A Portrait Of The Western Homestead Era.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2008. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Stunning photographic testimony to the hard realities of western farming. In words that are as clean and precise as his haunting, starkly beautiful photographs, John Martin Campbell vividly recreates the life and times of the western homestead era, the period from about 1885 when the prairie lands lying west of the longitude of the western Dakotas became available to pioneering farmers. More than 70 black-and-white duotone photographs, with detailed captions, record bleak landscapes and abandoned farms, outbuildings, farm implements, and hand tools—mute testimonies to the failed hopes of several million families who settled on these arid and semi-arid lands. Campbell explains how their failure resulted from a deadly combination of natural and economic causes. Historians of the western United States have largely ignored the homesteaders, despite the lessons their experiences teach about irrigation and dry farming on the northern plains and the impact of the Great Depression and Dust Bowl. There is little romance in farming, especially when compared with that attached to cowboys, Indians, and explorers. Still, the homesteaders were heroes in the opening of the West, and this book, with its moving text, historical introduction, and stunning photographs, tells their story. John Martin Campbell is Professor Emeritus of Anthropology and Research Professor and Research Curator of the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology at the University of New Mexico. He is the author of two other photographic works, Few and Far Between: Moments on the North American Desert and The Prairie Schoolhouse. Kenneth W. Karsmizki is Executive Director and Curator of History at the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center, The Dalles, Oregon. "An evocative marriage of the visual and the verbal, Magnificent Failure stands as a poignant essay on the human condition that will appeal to everyone interested in the American West." —Carlos A. Schwantes, author of The Pacific Northwest: An Interpretive History 
Price: 13.97 USD
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52 CARVALHO, SOLOMON NUNES; KAHN, AVA F. (INTRODUCTION). Incidents Of Travel And Adventure In The Far West With Colonel Fremont's Last Expedition.
University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln: 2004. 0803264445 / 9780803264441 First Nebraska Paperback Printing. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
In August 1853, an American-born Sephardic Jew, Solomon Nunes Carvalho, accepted John Frmont's invitation to join his fifth expedition to find the best overland route to California. A Baltimore artist, inventor, and daguerreotypist, Carvalho was given the job of creating a photographic record of the lands and peoples along the way. Frmont's party left the Missouri on September 14, 1853, traveled up the Kansas River, overland to the Arkansas, upriver past Bent's Fort to the Huerfano, and traversed the Sandhill Pass into the Rocky Mountains. Beset by heavy snows and intense cold, they were reduced to eating their horses and mules and the occasional beaver or porcupine while making their way in midwinter across the Grand, Green, and Sevier Rivers. Suffering from frostbite, scurvy, and dysentery, Carvalho left the expedition in Utah; spent four months among the Mormons in Salt Lake City, where he observed with keen interest their system of spiritual wives; and reached California in 1854. Carvalho became the first Jewish writer to publish accounts of the Great American West and was also one of the first people to photograph the American West. Although only one of his plates is known to survive, others became the models for wood and steel engravings that broadcast the image of the West throughout the world. This Bison Books edition restores the discourses on Mormon doctrine omitted from previous twentieth-century editions. Ava F. Kahn is a visiting scholar at the California Studies Center, University of California, Berkeley. Her books include Jewish Voices of the California Gold Rush: A Documentary History, 1849-1880; Jewish Life in the American West: Perspectives on Migration, Settlement, and Community; and California Jews (coedited with Marc Dollinger). "Incidents of Travel and Adventure is a valuable primary source of information on Fremont's fifth expedition, and as such should find a place in the library of anyone interested in westward expansion."—Roundup Magazine 
Price: 15.39 USD
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53 CASAS, MARÍA RAQUÉL. Married To A Daughter Of The Land. Spanish- Mexican Women And Interethnic Marriage In California, 1820-1880.
University of Nevada Press, Reno: 2009. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
ISBN: Binding: [Paperback] Pages: 280 Publication date: March 2009 $24.95 Add to cart Bookmark and Share Married to a Daughter of the Land Spanish-Mexican Women and Interethnic Marriage in California, 1820-1880 by Maria Raqul Casas Description The surprising truth about intermarriage in 19th-Century California. Until recently, most studies of the colonial period of the American West have focused on the activities and agency of men. Now, historian Maria Raqul Casas examines the role of Spanish-Mexican women in the development of California. She finds that, far from being pawns in a male-dominated society, Californianas of all classes were often active and determined creators of their own destinies, finding ways to choose their mates, to leave unsatisfactory marriages, and to maintain themselves economically. Using a wide range of sources in English and Spanish, Casas unveils a picture of women's lives in these critical decades of California's history. She shows how many Spanish-Mexican women negotiated the precarious boundaries of gender and race to choose Euro-American husbands, and what this intermarriage meant to the individuals involved and to the larger multiracial society evolving from California's rich Hispanic and Indian past. Casas's discussion ranges from California's burgeoning economy to the intimacies of private households and ethnically mixed families. Here we discover the actions of real women of all classes as they shaped their own identities. Married to a Daughter of the Land is a significant and fascinating contribution to the history of women in the American West and to our understanding of the complex role of gender, race, and class in the Borderlands of the Southwest. Maria Raqul Casas is an associate professor of history at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. "This work provides the first comprehensive scholarly treatment of Mexican/EuroAmerican intermarriage in the Spanish borderlands. Casas convincingly challenges earlier studies that portrayed Spanish-speaking California women as helpless debutantes whose fathers used them to protect their own economic interests and social position." —Vicki L. Ruiz, University of California, Irvine "Casas's engaging depiction of nineteenth-century California offers a new understanding of the intermixing of peoples concomitant with the Spanish-Mexican and the American conquests of California." — -The Journal of American History "The women's stories are compelling and provide an important look at the convergences of cultures, races, and public and private space and discourse. They are an important contribution to Western history and the growing work on Mexican Americans and women in the 19th century." — CHOICE "...a richly textured, nuanced analysis of women's agency and negotiation of gender, race, class, culture, identity, and intimacy on California's changing, often volatile, political, economic, and cultural landscape." —-Western Historical Quarterly "Casas skillfully restores the 'portraits of some individual Spanish-Mexican women' previously hidden beneath decades of romantic varnish, finding new narratives where the same stories are often uncritically repeated." —-Southern California Quarterly 
Price: 23.70 USD
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54 CHALFANT, WILLIAM Y. Hancock's War: Conflict On The Southern Plains.
The Arthur H Clark Company. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
When General Winfield Scott Hancock led a military expedition across Kansas, Colorado, and Nebraska in 1867, his purpose was a show of force that would curtail Indian raiding sparked by the Sand Creek massacre of 1864. But the havoc he and his troops wrought on the plains served only to further incite the tribes and inflame passions on both sides, disrupting U.S.-Indian relations for more than a decade. William Y. Chalfant has devoted years of research to produce a detailed narrative covering the entire scope of Hancock's "Expedition for the Plains." This first thorough scholarly history of the ill-conceived expedition offers an unequivocal evaluation of military strategies and a culturally sensitive interpretation of Indian motivations and reactions. Chalfant explores the vastly different ways of life that separated the Cheyennes and U.S. policymakers, and argues that neither side was willing or able to understand the needs of the other. He shows how Hancock's efforts were counterproductive, brought untold misery to Indians and whites alike, and led to the wars of 1868. One of the most significant Indian campaigns in American history, Hancock's War is in many ways a microcosm of all the wars between Indians and whites on the high plains. Chalfant's sweeping narrative forms the definitive history of a questionable enterprise. 
Price: 56.95 USD
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55 CHALFANT, WILLIAM Y. Hancock's War: Conflict On The Southern Plains.
The Arthur H Clark Company. s Deluxe Leather. Brand new book. 
When General Winfield Scott Hancock led a military expedition across Kansas, Colorado, and Nebraska in 1867, his purpose was a show of force that would curtail Indian raiding sparked by the Sand Creek massacre of 1864. But the havoc he and his troops wrought on the plains served only to further incite the tribes and inflame passions on both sides, disrupting U.S.-Indian relations for more than a decade. William Y. Chalfant has devoted years of research to produce a detailed narrative covering the entire scope of Hancock's "Expedition for the Plains." This first thorough scholarly history of the ill-conceived expedition offers an unequivocal evaluation of military strategies and a culturally sensitive interpretation of Indian motivations and reactions. Chalfant explores the vastly different ways of life that separated the Cheyennes and U.S. policymakers, and argues that neither side was willing or able to understand the needs of the other. He shows how Hancock's efforts were counterproductive, brought untold misery to Indians and whites alike, and led to the wars of 1868. One of the most significant Indian campaigns in American history, Hancock's War is in many ways a microcosm of all the wars between Indians and whites on the high plains. Chalfant's sweeping narrative forms the definitive history of a questionable enterprise. 
Price: 118.75 USD
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56 CHALMERS, CLAUDINE. Chronicling The West For Harper's: Coast To Coast With Frenzeny & Tavernier In 1873-1874.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2013. Volume 12 in the Charles M. Russell Center Series on Art and Photography of the American West. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
The opening of the West after the Civil War drew a flood of Americans and immigrants to the frontier. Among the liveliest records of the westering of the 1870s is the series of prints collected for the first time in this book. Chronicling the West for Harper's showcases 100 illustrations made for the weekly magazine by French artists Paul Frenzeny and Jules Tavernier on a cross-country assignment in 1873 and 1874. The pair—"Frenzeny & Tavernier," as they signed their work—documented the newly accessible territories, their diverse inhabitants, and the changing frontier. Historian Claudine Chalmers focuses on the life and work of Frenzeny and Tavernier, who were accomplished and adventurous enough to succeed as "special artists," the label Harper's Weekly gave the illustrators it sent into the field. The job required imagination, courage, and adaptability, not to mention expert draftsmanship. Frenzeny, a skilled artist who accepted his adopted country's many cultures, was also a superb horseman. Tavernier had been trained to work fast in a variety of media. Both men had the advantage of viewing America with fresh eyes. They began their artistic record in the East with An Emigrant Boarding-House in New York. Their journey ended in San Francisco, where they sketched the city's bustling Chinatown and pastoral Marin County suburbs. Along with each illustration, the artists sent Harper's a description; those captions are reproduced here. Frenzeny and Tavernier documented the frontier as it evolved. They depicted the hazards of travel and settlement, from fires to destitution, and presented disconcerting subject matter—such as the Sioux Sun Dance—in relentless detail. Their skill has made some of their drawings, among them The Strike in the Coal Mine, classics of American culture. With pencil and woodblock, Chalmers shows, these intrepid Frenchmen shaped public perceptions of the West for decades to come. Claudine Chalmers, an independent historian, is the author of Splendide Californie! Impressions of the Golden State by French Artists, 1786 to 1900. 
Price: 42.75 USD
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57 CHAMBERLAIN, KATHLEEN P. In The Shadow Of Billy The Kid: Susan Mcsween And The Lincoln County War.
University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque: 2012. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The Lincoln County War catipulted Susan McSween and a young cowboy named Henry McCarty, alias Billy the Kid, into the history books. Winner of the 2013 Southwest Book Awards from the Border Regional Library Association. The events of July 19, 1878, marked the beginning of what became known as the Lincoln County War and catapulted Susan McSween and a young cowboy named Henry McCarty, alias Billy the Kid, into the history books. The so-called war, a fight for control of the mercantile economy of southeastern New Mexico, is one of the most documented conflicts in the history of the American West, but it is an event that up to now has been interpreted through the eyes of men. As a woman in a man's story, Susan McSween has been all but ignored. This is the first book to place her in a larger context. Clearly, the Lincoln County War was not her finest hour, just her best known. For decades afterward, she ran a successful cattle ranch. She watched New Mexico modernize and become a state. And she lived to tell the tales of the anarchistic territorial period many times. Kathleen P. Chamberlain is professor of history at Eastern Michigan University. She is the author of Victorio: Apache Leader and Warrior (2007) and Under Sacred Ground: A History of Navajo Oil, 1922-1982 (UNM Press, 2000) and coauthor of Power and Promise: The Changing American West with Gary C. Anderson (2008). 6 x 9 inches, 312 pages 22 halftones, 4 maps. 
Price: 28.45 USD
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58 CHEFF, BUD JR. Legend Keeper: More Trails And Tales.
Stoneydale Press, Stevensville: . 1931291993 / 9781931291996 s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The enrichment of any place's historical record is always cherished, but this book accomplishes the best of the best in bringing to light many of the incredible, little-known-until-now, forgotten or overlooked stories of the people and events that made Montana's Mission Valley a legendary place. Author Bud Cheff Jr. has delved even deeper into the legends of the Mission Valley than his famous father did in his classic and best-selling book "Indian Tales and Grizzly Tales" a generation ago. As a person who has made it a lifetime quest to seek out the stories, the legends, the details of life as it has played out in the Mission Valley, Bud Cheff Jr. has put together a masterpiece of insight into the past, the legends, of his valley. As a native of the valley and founder of the Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana, Cheff has spent a lifetime collecting artifacts, researching and writing about the way of life in the Mission Valley's early days as well as today. The result is an historical classic: "Legend Keeper: More Trails and Tales" - a collection in text and photographs of a life lived out in a legendary place and the stories of dozens of people whose exploits became legendary. More than 80 stories, a Foreword by Dale A. Burk, an introduction by the author and seven chapters take the reader deep into the history of the Mission Valley, a special part of western Montana. At the outset, Cheff tells of a life, his own, developed by the wild landscape in which he grew up, as well as experiences that shaped his life. Then there's such insights as growing up in a true Montana ranch family, a moonshine run, Post Creek rustler, a boy and his chaps, and a coach who inspired a lifetime of positive attitude. Stories from Montana's past include a lost gold mine, the deer child, a winter medicine dance in 1924, bootleggers, war song and the blacksmith's daughter. An entire chapter includes 22 bear stories, most of them involving grizzlies including an unforgettable one named Shadow, catching a mountain lion by the tail, and others. In Chapter Five the author tells of his love for Longhorn cattle, but also includes stories on cowboys and an outstanding early-day Montana cowboy, Billy Schall. Chapter Six, titled "Unwritten Indian Stories" tells stories of such things as the bee tree, the historical and amazing personage of Eneas Conko, traditional medicine ceremonies, the Flathead war chiefs of the 1880's, Jacques Houle (Hoole), the Flathead Indians and amazing tales of horsemanship, the famous Jackson Sundown and the Nez Perce war, the end of a way of life, and the Blackfeet winter raid at Wild Plum Camp. 
Price: 18.95 USD
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59 CHEFF, SR., BUD. Indian Trails And Grizzly Tales.
Stoneydale Press, Stevensville: 1993. 0912299541 / 9780912299549 Second Printing. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
When Bud Cheff Sr. set out to write a book about his life, the intent was to do a personal reminiscence in which he'd convey to his family and friends his incredible adventures in a life that spanned the transition era from pioneer days to the present in the remote, forested wilderness, the "Grizzly Country" at the edge of the Mission Mountains east of Ronan in western Montana - and his book is full of numerous encounters with the grizzly. But he has accomplished much more than that. His book truly reveals the drama and the innocence of making a way of life in a remote and wild land. This land in which Bud Cheff was raised was, and is, however, Indian Country, too, and many stories portray his close relationship with the Flathead Indians. Befriended by the famous Flathead leader, Eneas Conko, whose son, Bill, was Bud's playmate and closest friend, Bud Cheff was taken along on numerous wilderness trips with the Flatheads when he was a boy, and his book literally sings with the excitement he experienced in learning Indian ways in the back country mountains that were to become known as the Mission Mountains Wilderness and the Bob Marshall Wilderness. In dozens of wonderful stories, Bud Cheff shares, with simplicity, warmth, and humility, a life lived at the edge of the wilderness - a time perhaps gone forever, but joyfully remembered in this reminiscence of an incredible life of adventure. 
Price: 14.20 USD
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60 CHRISTIANSON, FRANK (EDITOR). The Popular Frontier: Buffalo Bill's Wild West And Transnational Mass Culture.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2017. Volume 4 in William F. Cody Series on the History and Culture of the American West. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
When William F. Cody introduced his Wild West exhibition to European audiences in 1887, the show soared to new heights of popularity and success. With its colorful portrayal of cowboys, Indians, and the taming of the North American frontier, Buffalo Bill's Wild West popularized a myth of American national identity and shaped European perceptions of the United States. The Popular Frontier is the first collection of essays to explore the transnational impact and mass-cultural appeal of Cody's Wild West. As editor Frank Christianson explains in his introduction, for the first four years after Cody conceived it, the Wild West exhibition toured the United States, honing the operation into a financially solvent enterprise. When the troupe ventured to England for its first overseas booking, its success exceeded all expectations. Between 1887 and 1906 the Wild West performed in fourteen countries, traveled more than 200,000 miles, and attracted a collective audience in the tens of millions. How did Europeans respond to Cody's vision of the American frontier? And how did European countries appropriate what they saw on display? Addressing these questions and others, the contributors to this volume consider how the Wild West functioned within social and cultural contexts far grander in scope than even the vast American West. Among the topics addressed are the pairing of William F. Cody and Theodore Roosevelt as embodiments of frontier masculinity, and the significance of the show's most enduring persona, Annie Oakley. An informative and thought-provoking examination of the Wild West's foreign tours, The Popular Frontier offers new insight into late-nineteenth-century gender politics and ethnicity, the development of American nationalism, and the simultaneous rise of a global mass culture. 19 black-and-white Illustrations, Hardcover, 264 pages, 6" x 9". Frank Christianson is Associate Professor of English and Associate Dean in the College of Humanities, Brigham Young University. He is editor of The Life of Hon. William F. Cody, Known as Buffalo Bill and The Wild West in England. In these concise, accessible essays, eleven scholars direct our gaze through an unlikely window upon the transatlantic travels of Buffalo Bill's Wild West. In showing how Europeans transformed America's frontier mythology to meet their own cultural needs, the essays—instructive, interlocking, and colorful, even kaleidoscopic, much like the Wild West show itself—also reveal how the exhibition's international journeys redefined the nation for its American audiences."—Louis S. Warren, author of Buffalo Bill's America: William Cody and the Wild West Show 
Price: 32.25 USD
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