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LATIN AMERICA.

LATIN AMERICA.

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61 O'BRIEN, THOMAS F. Making The Americas: The United States And Latin America From The Age Of Revolutions To The Era Of Globalization.
University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque: University of Notre Dame Press, Notre Dame: s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Americans's belief in their economic, political, and cultural superiority launched them on a mission to transform Latin America that has evolved into a global process of Americanization. From corporate and philanthropic initiatives to military interventions, Americans motivated by self-interest and idealism sought to reshape Latin America and gave birth to the American driven process of globalization. Synthesizing a broad range of international relations scholarship, including perspectives from gender, race, and cultural studies, O'Brien offers a sweeping history of the Americas that ranges from the adventures of eighteenth-century whaling men to the contemporary struggle over globalization. As a part of this study, the author explains how the responses of Latin Americans to Americanization have varied from the vehement rejection of U.S. economic dominance to embracing as well as reconfiguring the icons of American consumer culture. O'Brien's goal is to provide readers with a nuanced understanding of how the people of the Americas have shaped their own history, and influenced the development of U.S. economic, strategic, and cultural power in the world today. Thomas F. O'Brien is professor and chair of the history department at the University of Houston and a specialist on business interests in Latin America. "A solid undergraduate text."-- Choice Magazine "This splendid new survey incorporates and distills more than a decade of a new generation of scholarship that understands the relations between the United States and Latin America as a two-way street, sensitive to cultural, social and economic dynamics, and not limited to the activities of state actors." -- Journal of Latin American Studies 
Price: 34.15 USD
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62 O'BRIEN, THOMAS F. The Century Of U.s. Capitalism In Latin America.
University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Addresses two issues basic to understanding modern Latin America: the role of American-owned businesses in the region and, of equal importance, the reaction of Latin Americans to foreign investment. Throughout the nineteenth century and up to the 1930s, American corporations stridently resisted local opposition as they secured what they wanted in Latin America, cheap labor, plentiful raw materials, and favorable business conditions. After World War II, Latin American nationalism and revolutions forced American-owned enterprises to redefine their business model throughout the region. U.S. businesses integrated themselves into local societies through direct investment in manufacturing and the creation of broad-based consumer societies eager to buy everything from Coca-Cola to Chevrolets. As a new century dawns, multinational corporations aided by NAFTA ensure computers and cellular phones are as sought after as soft drinks and cars were in earlier eras. The first book on U.S. business activity in Latin America intended specifically for student readers, this account offers a balanced and insightful understanding of the nature of capitalism abroad. In assessing how U.S.-Latin American relations have been shaped by foreign investment, O'Brien argues that over the course of the twentieth century U.S. businesses and their government have forged a close working alliance to promote American interests in Latin America. Thomas F. O'Brien is professor and chair of the history department at the University of Houston and a specialist on business interests in Latin America. "This work provides a much-needed balance to the literature on capitalism in the Americas . . . [it] will be of considerable interest and use to all students of U.S. and Latin American history. It is necessary reading for anyone wishing to more fully understand the role of U.S. capitalism in the Americas." -- Books for the Western Library " . . . a very useful teaching tool. It is well-written. . . . O'Brien has accomplished the difficult aim of presenting both the U.S. and the Latin American perspectives of the story in a balanced manner."-- Latin American Reviews "The author has written an optimistic book about U.S. economic involvement in Latin America in the twentieth century. . . . Hopefully it will inspire undergraduate students to think critically about how the international economy has impacted so many aspects of Latin American societies and cultures." -- New Mexico Historical Review 
Price: 29.40 USD
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63 O'NEIL, MEGAN E. Engaging Ancient Maya Sculpture At Piedras Negras, Guatemala.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2012. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Offers new ways to understand ancient Maya sculpture. Now shrouded in Guatemalan jungle, the ancient Maya city of Piedras Negras flourished between the sixth and ninth centuries c.e., when its rulers erected monumental limestone sculptures carved with hieroglyphic texts and images of themselves and family members, advisers, and captives. In Engaging Ancient Maya Sculpture at Piedras Negras, Guatemala, Megan E. O'Neil offers new ways to understand these stelae, altars, and panels by exploring how ancient Maya people interacted with them. These monuments, considered sacred, were one of the community's important forms of cultural and religious expression. Stelae may have held the essence of rulers they commemorated, and the objects remained loci for reverence of those rulers after they died. Using a variety of evidence, O'Neil examines how the forms, compositions, and contexts of the sculptures invited people to engage with them and the figures they embodied. She looks at these monuments not as inert bearers of images but as palpable presences that existed in real space at specific historical moments. Her analysis brings to the fore the material and affective force of these powerful objects that were seen, touched, and manipulated in the past. O'Neil investigates the monuments not only at the moment of their creation but also in later years and shows how they changed over time. She argues that the relationships among sculptures of different generations were performed in processions, through which ancient Maya people integrated historical dialogues and ancestral commemoration into the landscape. With the help of 150 illustrations, O'Neil reveals these sculptures' continuing life histories, which in the past century have included their fragmentation and transformation into commodities sold on the international art market. Shedding light on modern-day transposition and display of these ancient monuments, O'Neil's study contributes to ongoing discussions of cultural patrimony. Megan E. O'Neil is Visiting Assistant Professor at the College of William and Mary. She received her BA and PhD from Yale University and her MA from the University of Texas at Austin. She has participated in archaeological projects in Belize, Mexico, and Guatemala. 
Price: 52.25 USD
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64 PFEFFERKORN, IGNAZ; BERNARD L. FONTANA (FOREWORD), THEODORE E. TREUTLEIN (TRANSLATOR) Sonora: A Description Of The Province.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2016. Southwest Center Series / Century Collection Series. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
"The bloodsucking bat, construction of bows and arrows, the punishment for adultery among the Apaches... all was grist that dropped into the industrious mill of Father Pfefferkorn's eyes, ears, and brain."—Saturday Review "To be read for enjoyment; nevertheless, the historian will find in it a wealth of information that has been shrewdly appraised, carefully sifted, and creditably related."—Catholic Historical Review "Of interest not only to the historian but to the geographer and anthropologist."—Pacific Historical Review "An important source of description of Spanish colonial Sonoran life and society."—Journal of the Southwest "Good reading. . . . Its prose is delightful, filled with humor and honesty."—Southwestern Mission Research Center Newsletter "Impressive."—Books of the Southwest "Piety and practicality, faith and empiricism, come together in harmony in these pages."—Hispanic American Historical Review Father Ignaz Pfefferkorn (1726-1798) was a Jesuit missionary to the Pima, Opata, and Eudeve Indians in New Spain. Bernard (Bunny) L. Fontana was a renowned authority on the history and anthropology of the Southwest. He worked at the University of Arizona as a lecturer in the anthropology department, an ethnologist at the Arizona State Museum, and a field historian in the library. He helped create the Southwestern Mission Research Center at the University of Arizona in 1965 and co-founded the Patronato San Xavier, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the restoration of Mission San Xavier del Bac. He passed away in 2016. 
Price: 33.25 USD
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65 PIERCE, DONNA. Festivals And Daily Life In The Arts Of Colonial Latin America, 1492-1850: Papers From The 2012 Mayer Center Symposium At The Denver Art Museum.
Denver Art Museum, Denver: 2014. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The Denver Art Museum held a symposium in 2012 hosted by the Frederick and Jan Mayer Center for Pre-Columbian and Spanish Colonial Art. The museum assembled an international group of scholars specializing in the arts and history of colonial Latin America to present recent research with topics ranging from ephemeral architecture, painting, and sculpture to engravings, decorative arts, costumes and clothing of the period. This volume presents revised and expanded versions of papers presented at the symposium. Barbara Mundy (Fordham University) opens the volume with a thought-provoking discussion of pre-Columbian dance festivals and their associated costumes and accoutrements, their continuation and reinterpretation in colonial Mexico, and their remaining vestiges in modern times. Gustavo Curiel (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mxico) presents a moving discussion of the mourning activities performed in Mexico City in 1666 to commemorate the death of Philip IV and reconstructs a vision of the ephemeral monument erected by the Inquisition by comparing documentary sources, such as the artist's contract, with surviving engravings of a similar monument. Frances Ramos (University of South Florida) brings the volume into the eighteenth century by examining celebrations and art in honor of Saint Joseph in the city of Puebla, Mexico. Beatriz Berndt (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mxico) continues the festival theme by analyzing extant engravings, written descriptions, and political motivations in the ephemeral faćade designed to celebrate the enthronement of Charles IV in Mexico City in 1789. Kelly Donahue-Wallace (University of North Texas) closes the festival section with a discussion of ephemeral structures and related public art works under the direction of the newly-founded Royal Academy of Art of San Carlos in the late colonial era. Jorge Rivas begins the discussion of daily life by presenting recent research on a uniquely American furniture form, the butaca (easy) chair, tracing its origins in Venezuela, and its eventual spread throughout pan-Caribbean Latin America. Susan Socolow closes the volume with an examination of women's quotidian clothing in colonial Argentina based on documentary evidence found in travelers' descriptions and extant estate inventories. Alexandra Troya-Kennedy (Universidad de Cuenca, Ecuador) closes the volume by tracing Ecuadorian costumbrista images of daily life from their origin in colonial-era Enlightenment discourse to their production for the tourist market and use by politicians in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. 96 color and 38 black-and-white Illustrations, 172 pages, 8.5" x 11". Donna Pierce is the former Frederick and Jan Mayer Curator of Spanish Colonial Art at the Denver Art Museum. 
Price: 33.20 USD
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66 POOLE, STAFFORD. Juan De Ovando: Governing The Spanish Empire In The Reign Of Philip II.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2004. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Philip II is a fascinating and enigmatic figure in Spanish history, but it was his letrados--professional bureaucrats and ministers trained in law--who made his vast castilian empire possible. In Juan de Ovando, Stafford Poole traces the life and career of a key minister in the king's government to explore the role that letrados played in Spanish society as they sought to displace the higher nobility in the administration through a system based upon merit. Juan de Ovando was an industrious, discerning, and loyal servant, yet, like all letrados, he owed his position to royal favor. Ovando began his career as an ecclesiastical judge and inquisitor in Seville. From there, at the king's order, he undertook the reform of the University of Alcala de Henares, one of his most enduring achievements. Appointed then to the supreme council of the Spanish Inquisition, Ovando was commissioned to investigate the Council of the Indies, over which he eventually presided. In this role, Ovando began codifying laws and collecting information about Spain's overseas possessions through the famed Relaciones geograficas--wide-ranging surveys of daily life in the New World. He devised long-term and forward-looking colonial policies for New Spain while, also serving as president of the Council of Finance, he sought to bring order to Spain's chaotic financial situation. Poole's biography of Juan de Ovando provides an intimate view of the day-to-day influence letrados wielded over the Spanish colonial machine. Stafford Poole, C.M., an ordained Roman Catholic priest, is the author of Our Lady of Guadalupe: The Origins and Sources of a Mexican National Symbol, 1531-1797 and Juan de Ovando: Governing the Spanish Empire in the Reign of Philip II. "An original synthesis that confirms or challenges other important interpretations. Not only readable but extremely interesting, Poole's Juan de Ovando brings a great deal of scholarship to a lively biography."—Ralph H. Vigil, author of Alonso de Zorita: Royal Judge and Christian Humanist, 1512-1585 "Poole brings a truly unique perspective to the issues of the period using new material from documented sources that have never been mined before. His scholarship is first-rate."—John F. Schwaller, coeditor of A Guide to Confession Large and Small in the Mexican Language, 1634 "Clearly written and solidly based on extensive archival research, . . . Poole's study belongs in all college and university libraries. Highly recommended."—Choice 
Price: 37.95 USD
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67 POOLE, STAFFORD. Juan De Ovando: Governing The Spanish Empire In The Reign Of Philip II.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2004. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Philip II is a fascinating and enigmatic figure in Spanish history, but it was his letrados--professional bureaucrats and ministers trained in law--who made his vast castilian empire possible. In Juan de Ovando, Stafford Poole traces the life and career of a key minister in the king's government to explore the role that letrados played in Spanish society as they sought to displace the higher nobility in the administration through a system based upon merit. Juan de Ovando was an industrious, discerning, and loyal servant, yet, like all letrados, he owed his position to royal favor. Ovando began his career as an ecclesiastical judge and inquisitor in Seville. From there, at the king's order, he undertook the reform of the University of Alcala de Henares, one of his most enduring achievements. Appointed then to the supreme council of the Spanish Inquisition, Ovando was commissioned to investigate the Council of the Indies, over which he eventually presided. In this role, Ovando began codifying laws and collecting information about Spain's overseas possessions through the famed Relaciones geograficas--wide-ranging surveys of daily life in the New World. He devised long-term and forward-looking colonial policies for New Spain while, also serving as president of the Council of Finance, he sought to bring order to Spain's chaotic financial situation. Poole's biography of Juan de Ovando provides an intimate view of the day-to-day influence letrados wielded over the Spanish colonial machine. Stafford Poole, C.M., an ordained Roman Catholic priest, is the author of Our Lady of Guadalupe: The Origins and Sources of a Mexican National Symbol, 1531-1797 and Juan de Ovando: Governing the Spanish Empire in the Reign of Philip II. "An original synthesis that confirms or challenges other important interpretations. Not only readable but extremely interesting, Poole's Juan de Ovando brings a great deal of scholarship to a lively biography."—Ralph H. Vigil, author of Alonso de Zorita: Royal Judge and Christian Humanist, 1512-1585 "Poole brings a truly unique perspective to the issues of the period using new material from documented sources that have never been mined before. His scholarship is first-rate."—John F. Schwaller, coeditor of A Guide to Confession Large and Small in the Mexican Language, 1634 "Clearly written and solidly based on extensive archival research, . . . Poole's study belongs in all college and university libraries. Highly recommended."—Choice 
Price: 23.70 USD
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68 POOLE, STAFFORD. Pedro Moya De Contreras: Catholic Reform And Royal Power In New Spain, 1571-1591.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2011. Second Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
A definitive portrait of a Spanish cleric and royalist who fundamentally shaped New Spain, updated in light of newly available sources For a brief few years in the sixteenth century, Pedro Moya de Contreras was the most powerful man in the New World. A church official and loyal royalist, he came to Mexico in 1571 to establish the Inquisition and later became archbishop and viceroy for the region. This new edition of Stafford Poole's definitive portrait of Moya de Contreras, first published in 1971, now offers an expanded understanding of this enigmatic figure's influence on the development of New Spain. In tracing the career of a sixteenth-century church official and administrator who was more notable for what he did than for who he was, Poole offers a rich source of information about Spanish rule in colonial Mexico and the evolving relationship between the Spanish monarchy and the Catholic Church. For this second edition, Poole draws on newly available sources to fill in gaps regarding Moya de Contreras's shadowy early career and final years in Spain. He also explores in greater depth the churchman's influence as Grand Inquisitor in light of the plethora of new research and recent publications on the Spanish Inquisition. Poole shows that Moya de Contreras was as diligent at carrying out the tortures of the Inquisition as he was at exposing government and church corruption. His reforming zeal reached its culmination in his leadership of the Third Mexican Provincial Council of 1585, which enacted a legal code for the Mexican Church that lasted more than three hundred years. Stafford Poole, C.M., an ordained Roman Catholic priest, is the author of Our Lady of Guadalupe: The Origins and Sources of a Mexican National Symbol, 1531-1797 and Juan de Ovando: Governing the Spanish Empire in the Reign of Philip II. 
Price: 42.75 USD
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69 QUINONES, SAM. Antonio's Gun And Delfino's Dream: True Tales Of Mexican Migration.
University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Sam Quinones's first book, True Tales From Another Mexico, was acclaimed for the way it peered into the corners of that country for its larger truths and complexities. Antonio's Gun and Delfino's Dream, Quinones's second collection of nonfiction tales, does the same for one of the most important issues of our times: the migration of Mexicans to the United States. Quinones has covered the world of Mexican immigrants for the last thirteen years--from Chicago to Oaxaca, Michoacan to southeast Los Angeles, Tijuana to Texas. Along the way, he has uncovered stories that help illuminate all that Mexicans seek when they come north, how they change their new country, and are changed by it. Here are the stories of the Henry Ford of velvet painting in Ciudad Juarez, the emergence of opera in Tijuana, the bizarre goings-on in the L.A. suburb of South Gate, and of the drug-addled colonies of Old World German Mennonites in Chihuahua. Through it all winds the tale of Delfino Juarez, a young construction worker, and modern-day Huckleberry Finn, who had to leave his village to change it. "Sam Quinones is a border legend. For those in the know, his reportage has been cause for celebration. Now, with Antonio's Gun and Delfino's Dream he takes us behind the lines and undercover. He puts a human face on 'illegal immigration' and he gives us stunning stories of survival and dread. However, he accomplishes something more valuable than a mere parade of sensational set pieces--Quinones starts to put the complex issues in the light of understanding and hard-won wisdom."--Luis A. Urrea, author of The Devil's Highway and The Hummingbird's Daughter "Antonio's Gun and Delfino's Dream is journalism that doesn't replay or expand on the clichd or stereotyped stories of the exotic border, of mystical or threatening mejicanos. Genuinely original work, what great fiction and nonfiction aspire to be, these are stories that stop time and remind us how great reading is."--Dagoberto Gilb, author of Hecho en Tejas Sam Quinones lived in Mexico for ten years writing freelance for a variety of U.S. publications. In 1998 he was a recipient of the Alicia Patterson Fellowship. In 2001 he published a highly acclaimed collection of stories about contemporary Mexico, True Tales from Another Mexico: The Lynch Mob, the Popsicle Kings, Chalino, and the Bronx (UNM Press). He now lives in Los Angeles with his wife, Sheila, and daughter, Kate, and is a staff writer for the Los Angeles Times. ". . . a keen look at the migrant economy . . . [in] nine skillful, moving stories. Quinones layers with the sociological, economic, and historical context of 60 years of immigration . . . [in these] very fine pieces of literary journalism." -- Publishers Weekly, starred review ". . . journalism that doesn't replay or expand on the cliched or stereotyped stories of the exotic border . . . Genuinely original work. . . ." -- San Francisco Chronicle "Where others see unremarkable immigrants, Quinones finds gold . . . he has filed the best dispatches about Mexican migration and its effects on the United States and Mexico, bar none." -- Los Angeles Times "Quinones' book humanizes a political issue that has become sloganized into meaninglessness . . . [he]delves deeply and with rich and illustrative detail into the cultural ramifications of our shaky borders." -- Santa Fe Reporter "This book humanizes the immigration issue . . . by focusing on in-depth profiles of migrants on both sides of the border and telling their tales with empathy and a novelist's eye for character, narrative structure, and psychological detail." -- Bloomsbury Review "The strength of Quinones' collection of stories rests in his ability to blur stories of departure and settlement...The accessibility of these 'true tales'...make Quinones' monograph ideally suited for undergraduate classes in borderlands, US West, and California history." -- Southern California Quarterly "Sam Quinones has a remarkable ability to put a human face on the controversial issue of immigration..." -- Magill's Literary Annual 2008 "[Antonio's Gun and Delfino's Dream] is an exclamation point in Quinones' career and solidifies its author's membership in an elite fraternity of border journalists....Quinones presents the matter with skill and insight refreshing to even the most migration-calloused ears." -- Texas Observer "Quinones approaches [Mexican immigration] with his eyes and ears open and with his mind not already made up. He reports the actual lives of people so they become something larger and more fascinating than theory." -- New Mexico Historical Review "...an engaging book in which biographies of individuals are skillfully assembled to provide a revealing look at political, economic and social change in Mexico and in Mexican communities in the United States." -- Journal of Latin American Studies "Sam Quinones has produced a sublime collection. . . . Antonio's Gun and Delfino's Dream [is] must reading for anyone seriously interested in the issue of immigration." -- Tennessean "This book illuminates individual lives in a historic movement and muses on the nature of the movement . . . scrupulously researched . . . infused with life and spirit and affection . . . Quinones is a hell of a storyteller." -- Tucson Weekly "[Quinones'] gift for storytelling brings the Mexican mindset to life and provides important cultural and economic context . . . the rich picture evoked overall is fascinating." -- Library Journal 
Price: 23.70 USD
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70 READ, PIERS PAUL. Alive.
Avon Books, New York: 1975. 038000321X / 9780380003211 First Avon Printing. s Softcover. Reading copy. 
This is the greatest modern epic of catastrophe and human endurance. "A classic in the literature of survival." -Newsweek. 
Price: 2.61 USD
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71 RECINOS, ADRIEN. Popol Vuh: The Sacred Book Of The Ancient Quiche Maya.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
This is the first complete version in English of the "Book of the People" of the Quiche Maya, the most powerful nation of the Guatemalan highlands in pre-Conquest times and a branch of the ancient Maya, whose remarkable civilization in pre-Columbian America is in many ways comparable to the ancient civilizations of the Mediterranean. Generally regarded as America's oldest book, the Popol Vuh, in fact, corresponds to our Christian Bible, and it is, moreover, the most important of the five pieces of the great library treasures of the Maya that survived the Spanish Conquest. The Popol Vuh was first transcribed in the Quiche language, Šbut in Latin characters, in the middle of the sixteenth century, by some unknown but highly literate Quiche Maya Indian-probably from the oral traditions of his people. This now lost manuscript was copied at the end of the seventeenth century by Father Francisco Ximnez, then parish priest of the village of Santo Tomas Chichicastenango in the highlands of Guatemala, today the most celebrated and best-known Indian town in all of Central America. The mythology, traditions, cosmogony, and history of the Quich Maya, including the chronology of their kings down to 1550, are related in simple yet literary style by the Indian chronicler. And Adrian Recinos has made a valuable contribution to the understanding and enjoyment of the document through his thorough going introduction and his identification of places and people in the footnotes. Adrian Recinos-who made a new Spanish translation from the original Ximnez manuscript in Quiche after he had discovered differences, omissions, and changes in the text published by Brasseur de Bourbourg in 1861—is a distinguished diplomat as well as linguist, archaeologist, and ethnologist. For sixteen years (1928- 44), minister and ambassador to the United States from his native Guatemala, he received the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws from George Washington University in 1942. Now retired, he lives in Guatemala City, where he pursues his linguistic and archaeological avocations. 
Price: 20.85 USD
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72 RIPPY, J. FRED Latin America: A Modern History.
University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor: 1958. h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Good condition. 

Price: 9.50 USD
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73 ROJO, DANNA A LEVIN. Return To Aztlan: Indians, Spaniards, And The Invention Of Nuevo Mxico.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2014. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
How mythical Aztec origin stories guided the Spanish in the conquest of Nuevo Mxico. Long before the Spanish colonizers established it in 1598, the "Kingdom of Nuevo Mxico" had existed as an imaginary world—and not the one based on European medieval legend so often said to have driven the Spaniards' ambitions in the New World. What the conquistadors sought in the 1500s, it seems, was what the native Mesoamerican Indians who took part in north-going conquest expeditions also sought: a return to the Aztecs' mythic land of origin, Aztlan. Employing long-overlooked historical and anthropological evidence, Danna A. Levin Rojo reveals how ideas these natives held about their own past helped determine where Spanish explorers would go and what they would conquer in the northwest frontier of New Spain—present-day New Mexico and Arizona. Return to Aztlan thus remaps an extraordinary century during which, for the first time, Western minds were seduced by Native American historical memories. Levin Rojo recounts a transformation—of an abstract geographic space, the imaginary world of Aztlan, into a concrete sociopolitical place. Drawing on a wide variety of early maps, colonial chronicles, soldier reports, letters, and native codices, she charts the gradual redefinition of native and Spanish cultural identity—and shows that the Spanish saw in Nahua, or Aztec, civilization an equivalence to their own. A deviation in European colonial naming practices provides the first clue that a transformation of Aztlan from imaginary to concrete world was taking place: Nuevo Mxico is the only place-name from the early colonial period in which Europeans combined the adjective "new" with an American Indian name. With this toponym, Spaniards referenced both Mexico-Tenochtitlan, the indigenous metropolis whose destruction made possible the birth of New Spain itself, and Aztlan, the ancient Mexicans' place of origin. Levin Rojo collects additional clues as she systematically documents why and how Spaniards would take up native origin stories and make a return to Aztlan their own goal—and in doing so, overturns the traditional understanding of Nuevo Mxico as a concept and as a territory. A book in the Latin American and Caribbean Arts and Culture initiative. 9 black-and-white and 16 color Illustrations, 6 maps, Hardcover, 320 pages, 7" x 10". Danna A. Levin Rojo is Professor of Mexican Historiography at the Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana in Azcapotzalco, Mexico City, and co-editor of The Disputed Territory in the War of 1846-1848. "In this innovative reading of a familiar story, Danna A. Levin Rojo challenges scholarly and popular traditions that attribute the Spaniards' sixteenth-century search for Nuevo Mxico to European medieval legends of the Seven Cities of Cibola. Instead, she demonstrates the pervasive influence that Mesoamerican historical memories of Aztlan, and the notion of returning to a place of origin, had on the European invaders. This book contributes to the literature on early colonial ethnohistory and will raise new questions in the field of U.S.-Mexico borderlands studies."—Cynthia Radding, author of Wandering Peoples: Colonialism, Ethnic Spaces, and Ecological Frontiers in Northwestern Mexico, 1700-1850 
Price: 34.15 USD
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74 ROURKE, THOMAS. Gomez: Tyrant Of The Andes.
William Morrow and Company, New York: 1936. First Edition. h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Fair condition. 
Here is the dramatic story of an ignorant barbarian who took hold of one section of the civilized world, Venezuela and made it his own. Includes an Index. 
Price: 18.05 USD
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75 RUIZ DE ALARCON, HERNANDO. Treatise On The Heathen Superstitions That Today Live Among The Indians Native To This New Spain, 1629.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The Treatise of Hernando Ruiz de Alarcon is one of the most important surviving documents of early colonial Mexico. It was written in 1629 as an aid to Roman Catholic churchmen in their efforts to root out the vestiges of pre-Columbian Aztec religious beliefs and practices. For the student of Aztec religion and culture is a valuable source of information. Hernando Ruiz de Alarcon was born in Taxco, Guerrero, Mexico, in the latter part of the sixteenth century. He attended the University of Mexico and later took holy orders. Sometime after he was assigned to the parish of Atenango, he began writing the Treatise for his fellow priests and church superiors to use as a guide in suppressing native "heresy." With great care and attention to detail Ruiz de Alarcon collected and recorded Aztec religious practices and incantations that had survived a century of Spanish domination (sometimes in his zeal extracting information from his informants through force and guile). He wrote down the incantations in Nahuatl and translated them into Spanish for his readers. He recorded rites for such everyday activities as woodcutting, traveling, hunting, fishing, farming, harvesting, fortune telling, lovemaking, and the curing of many diseases, from toothache to scorpion stings. Although Ruiz de Alarcon was scornful of native medical practices, we know now that in many aspects of medicine the Aztec curers were far ahead of their European counterparts. 
Price: 38.90 USD
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76 SAEGER, JAMES SCHOFIELD. The Chaco Mission Frontier: The Guaycuruan Experience.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2016. Latin American Studies Series. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Spanish missions in the New World usually pacified sedentary peoples accustomed to the agricultural mode of mission life, prompting many scholars to generalize about mission history. James Saeger now reconsiders the effectiveness of the missions by examining how Guaycuruan peoples of South America's Gran Chaco adapted to them during the eighteenth century. Because the Guaycuruans were hunter-gatherers less suited to an agricultural lifestyle, their attitudes and behaviors can provide new insight about the impact of missions on native peoples. Responding to recent syntheses of the mission system, Saeger proposes that missions in the Gran Chaco did not fit the usual pattern. Through research in colonial documents, he reveals the Guaycuruan perspective on the missions, thereby presenting an alternative view of Guaycuruan history and the development of the mission system. He investigates Guaycuruan social, economic, political, and religious life before the missions and analyzes subsequent changes; he then traces Guaycuruan history into the modern era and offers an assessment of what Catholic missions meant to these peoples. Saeger's research into Spanish documents is unique for its elicitation of the Indian point of view. He not only reconstructs Guaycuruan life independent of Spanish contact but also shows how these Indians negotiated the conditions under which they would adapt to the mission way of life, thereby retaining much of their independence. By showing that the Guaycuruans were not as restricted in missions as has been assumed, Saeger demonstrates that there is a distinct difference between the establishment of missions and conquest. The Chaco Mission Frontier helps redefine mission studies by correcting overgeneralization about their role in Latin America. "This excellent book . . . sharpens our understanding of the importance of Indian agency with regard to the impact of colonialism and Christianity in South America. By shifting our focus away from the activities of missionaries to studying almost exclusively how Native Americans responded to life in missions, it makes a significant contribution to our understanding of ethnohistory and the borderland of cultures."—International History Review "Thorough, compelling, and unique in its interpretation . . . Saeger's Guaycuruans are active participants in their historical development, and he provides scholars with a strong example of writing Native Americans back into their history."—American Historical Review "A laudable piece of scholarship that summarizes the history of a disappearing people . . . a 'must read' for the well-informed anthropologist, historian, and geographer."—Catholic Historical Review 
Price: 28.45 USD
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77 SANTAMARIA, GEMA & DAVID CAREY (EDITORS) WTH A PREFACE BY CECILIA MENJÍVAR AND AN AFTERWORD BY DIANE E. DAVIS. Violence And Crime In Latin America: Representations And Politics.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2017. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
According to media reports, Latin America is one of the most violent regions in the world—a distinction it held throughout the twentieth century. The authors of Violence and Crime in Latin America contend that perceptions and representations of violence and crime directly impact such behaviors, creating profound consequences for the political and social fabric of Latin American nations. Written by distinguished scholars of Latin American history, sociology, anthropology, and political science, the essays in this volume range from Mexico and Argentina to Colombia and Brazil in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, addressing such issues as extralegal violence in Mexico, the myth of indigenous criminality in Guatemala, and governments' selective blindness to violent crime in Brazil and Jamaica. The authors in this collection examine not only the social construction and political visibility of violence and crime in Latin America, but the justifications for them as well. Analytically and historically, these essays show how Latin American citizens have sanctioned criminal and violent practices and incorporated them into social relations, everyday practices, and institutional settings. At the same time, the authors explore the power struggles that inform distinctions between illegitimate versus legitimate violence. Violence and Crime in Latin America makes a substantive contribution to understanding a key problem facing Latin America today. In its historical depth and ethnographic reach, this original and thought-provoking volume enhances our understanding of crime and violence throughout the Western Hemisphere. 7 black-and-white Illustrations, 6 tables, 3 graphs, 336 pages, 6" x 9". Gema Santamaria is Assistant Professor in the Department of International Studies at the Instituto Tecnologico Autonomo de Mxico in Mexico City. She has served as a visiting fellow at the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies and as a consultant for the United Nations Development Program. Cecilia Menjivar is Foundation Distinguished Professor of Sociology at Kansas University and author of Enduring Violence: Ladina Women's Lives in Guatemala. Diane E. Davis is Charles Dyer Norton Professor of Regional Planning and Urbanism at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design. David Carey Jr. holds the Doehler Chair in History at Loyola University and is author of several books including I Ask for Justice: Maya Women, Dictators, and Crime in Guatemala and Engendering Mayan History: Kaqchikel Women as Agents and Conduits of the Past. "This book is a must-read for understanding crime and violence in Latin America. It challenges views of Latin American violence that either focus too much on regional particularities or univocally stress the role of the state as the overpowering site of violence and repression. Rather than denying these dimensions, the book recalibrates their significance by placing them in a larger, South-South geopolitical context. It will become a mandatory reference for studies of violence in Latin America and beyond."—Federico Finchelstein, author of Transatlantic Fascism: Ideology, Violence and the Sacred in Argentina and Italy, 1919-1945 
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78 SANTIAGO, ESMERALDA (EDITOR). Las Christmas: Favorite Latino Authors Share Their Holiday Memories.
Alfred A. Knopf, New York: 1998. 0375401512 / 9780375401510 First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 
Richly illustrated and and embellished with songs and poems, along with recipes for an unforgettable Christmas dinner---this is an enduring treasury of Latino writing to read again and again. 
Price: 42.04 USD
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79 SCHULER, FRIEDRICH E. Secret Wars And Secret Policies In The Americas, 1842-1929.
University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque: . h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
The conflicts that culminated in the First and Second World Wars had their oriigins in the rise of imperial powers in North America, Europe and Asia in the late nineteenth century and the imperialist quests for the resources of colonies and former colonies. 
Price: 42.99 USD
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80 SIGMUND, PAUL E. (EDITOR). Models Of Political Change In Latin America.
Praeger Publishers, New York: 1970. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 
It is the virtue of the present collection of documents and articles that it presents--generally in the words of the Latin Americans themselves---all sides of the current debate over political, social, and economic change in the region. 
Price: 18.76 USD
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