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61 FISCHER, DAVID HACKETT. The Great Wave: Price Revolutions And The Rhythm Of History.
Oxford University Press, New York/Oxford/London: 1996. 019505377X / 9780195053777 First Printing. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 
David Hackett Fischer, one of our most prominent historians, has garnered a reputation for making history come alive - even stories as familiar as Paul Revere's ride, or as complicated as the assimilation of British culture in North America. Now, in The Great Wave, Fischer has done it again, marshaling an astonishing array of historical facts in lucid and compelling prose to outline a history of prices - "the history of change," as Fischer puts it - covering the dazzling sweep of Western history from the medieval glory of Chartres to the modern day. Going far beyond the economic data, Fischer writes a powerful history of the people of the Western world: the economic patterns they lived in, and the politics, culture, and society that they created as a result. As he did in Albion's Seed and Paul Revere's Ride, two of the most talked-about history books in recent years, Fischer combines extensive research and meticulous scholarship with wonderfully evocative writing to create a book for scholars and general readers alike. Records of prices are more abundant than any other quantifiable data, and span the entire range of history, from tables of medieval grain prices to the overabundance of modern statistics. Fischer studies this wealth of data, creating a narrative that encompasses all of Western culture. He describes four waves of price revolutions, each beginning in a period of equilibrium: the High Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, and finally the Victorian Age. Each revolution is marked by continuing inflation, a widening gap between rich and poor, increasing instability, and finally a crisis at the crest of the wave that is characterized by demographic contraction, social and political upheaval, and economic collapse. The most violent of these climaxes was the catastrophic fourteenth century, in which war, famine, and the Black Death devastated the continent--the only time in Europe's history that the population actually declined. Fischer also brilliantly illuminates how these long economic waves are closely intertwined with social and political events, affecting the very mindset of the people caught in them. The long periods of equilibrium are marked by cultural and intellectual movements - such as the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, and the Victorian Age - based on a belief in order and harmony and in the triumph of progress and reason. By contrast, the years of price revolution created a melancholy culture of despair. Fischer suggests that we are living now in the last stages of a price revolution that has been building since the turn of the century. The destabilizing price surges and declines and the diminished expectations the United States has suffered in recent years - and the famines and wars of other areas of the globe - are typical of the crest of a price revolution. He does not attempt to predict what will happen, noting that "uncertainty about the future is an inexorable fact of our condition." Rather, he ends with a brilliant analysis of where we might go from here and what our choices are now. This book is essential reading for anyone concerned about the state of the world today. David Hackett Fischer is Warren Professor of History at Brandeis University. He has won numerous awards for scholarship and teaching, including the Carnegie Prize as Massachusetts Teacher of the Year in 1991. 
Price: 18.10 USD
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62 FISCHER, DAVID HACKETT. The Great Wave: Price Revolutions And The Rhythm Of History.
Oxford University Press, New York/Oxford/London: 1996. 019505377X / 9780195053777 h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
David Hackett Fischer, one of our most prominent historians, has garnered a reputation for making history come alive - even stories as familiar as Paul Revere's ride, or as complicated as the assimilation of British culture in North America. Now, in The Great Wave, Fischer has done it again, marshaling an astonishing array of historical facts in lucid and compelling prose to outline a history of prices - "the history of change," as Fischer puts it - covering the dazzling sweep of Western history from the medieval glory of Chartres to the modern day. Going far beyond the economic data, Fischer writes a powerful history of the people of the Western world: the economic patterns they lived in, and the politics, culture, and society that they created as a result. As he did in Albion's Seed and Paul Revere's Ride, two of the most talked-about history books in recent years, Fischer combines extensive research and meticulous scholarship with wonderfully evocative writing to create a book for scholars and general readers alike. Records of prices are more abundant than any other quantifiable data, and span the entire range of history, from tables of medieval grain prices to the overabundance of modern statistics. Fischer studies this wealth of data, creating a narrative that encompasses all of Western culture. He describes four waves of price revolutions, each beginning in a period of equilibrium: the High Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, and finally the Victorian Age. Each revolution is marked by continuing inflation, a widening gap between rich and poor, increasing instability, and finally a crisis at the crest of the wave that is characterized by demographic contraction, social and political upheaval, and economic collapse. The most violent of these climaxes was the catastrophic fourteenth century, in which war, famine, and the Black Death devastated the continent--the only time in Europe's history that the population actually declined. Fischer also brilliantly illuminates how these long economic waves are closely intertwined with social and political events, affecting the very mindset of the people caught in them. The long periods of equilibrium are marked by cultural and intellectual movements - such as the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, and the Victorian Age - based on a belief in order and harmony and in the triumph of progress and reason. By contrast, the years of price revolution created a melancholy culture of despair. Fischer suggests that we are living now in the last stages of a price revolution that has been building since the turn of the century. The destabilizing price surges and declines and the diminished expectations the United States has suffered in recent years - and the famines and wars of other areas of the globe - are typical of the crest of a price revolution. He does not attempt to predict what will happen, noting that "uncertainty about the future is an inexorable fact of our condition." Rather, he ends with a brilliant analysis of where we might go from here and what our choices are now. This book is essential reading for anyone concerned about the state of the world today. David Hackett Fischer is Warren Professor of History at Brandeis University. He has won numerous awards for scholarship and teaching, including the Carnegie Prize as Massachusetts Teacher of the Year in 1991. 
Price: 66.50 USD
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63 FISCHER, DAVID HACKETT. The Great Wave: Price Revolutions And The Rhythm Of History.
Oxford University Press, New York/Oxford/London: 1999. 019512121X / 9780195121216 s Softcover. Brand new book. 
David Hackett Fischer, one of our most prominent historians, has garnered a reputation for making history come alive - even stories as familiar as Paul Revere's ride, or as complicated as the assimilation of British culture in North America. Now, in The Great Wave, Fischer has done it again, marshaling an astonishing array of historical facts in lucid and compelling prose to outline a history of prices - "the history of change," as Fischer puts it - covering the dazzling sweep of Western history from the medieval glory of Chartres to the modern day. Going far beyond the economic data, Fischer writes a powerful history of the people of the Western world: the economic patterns they lived in, and the politics, culture, and society that they created as a result. As he did in Albion's Seed and Paul Revere's Ride, two of the most talked-about history books in recent years, Fischer combines extensive research and meticulous scholarship with wonderfully evocative writing to create a book for scholars and general readers alike. Records of prices are more abundant than any other quantifiable data, and span the entire range of history, from tables of medieval grain prices to the overabundance of modern statistics. Fischer studies this wealth of data, creating a narrative that encompasses all of Western culture. He describes four waves of price revolutions, each beginning in a period of equilibrium: the High Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, and finally the Victorian Age. Each revolution is marked by continuing inflation, a widening gap between rich and poor, increasing instability, and finally a crisis at the crest of the wave that is characterized by demographic contraction, social and political upheaval, and economic collapse. The most violent of these climaxes was the catastrophic fourteenth century, in which war, famine, and the Black Death devastated the continent--the only time in Europe's history that the population actually declined. Fischer also brilliantly illuminates how these long economic waves are closely intertwined with social and political events, affecting the very mindset of the people caught in them. The long periods of equilibrium are marked by cultural and intellectual movements - such as the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, and the Victorian Age - based on a belief in order and harmony and in the triumph of progress and reason. By contrast, the years of price revolution created a melancholy culture of despair. Fischer suggests that we are living now in the last stages of a price revolution that has been building since the turn of the century. The destabilizing price surges and declines and the diminished expectations the United States has suffered in recent years - and the famines and wars of other areas of the globe - are typical of the crest of a price revolution. He does not attempt to predict what will happen, noting that "uncertainty about the future is an inexorable fact of our condition." Rather, he ends with a brilliant analysis of where we might go from here and what our choices are now. This book is essential reading for anyone concerned about the state of the world today. David Hackett Fischer is Warren Professor of History at Brandeis University. He has won numerous awards for scholarship and teaching, including the Carnegie Prize as Massachusetts Teacher of the Year in 1991. 
Price: 28.49 USD
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64 FISCHER, EDWARD F. Cash On The Table: Markets, Values, And Moral Economies.
School for Advanced Research Press. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
A great deal is at stake in understanding the moral dimensions of economic behavior and markets. Public debates over executive compensation, the fair trade movement, and recent academic inquiries into the limitations of rational-choice paradigms all point to the relevance of moral values in our economic decision-making processes. Moral values inform economic behavior. On its face, this proposition is unassailable. Think of the often spiritual appeal of consumer goods or the value-laden stakes of upward or downward mobility. Consider the central role that moral questions regarding poverty, access to health care, the tax code, property and land rights, and corruption play in the shaping of modern governments, societies, and social movements. Ponder the meaning of fair trade coffee and organic produce as well as Walmart's everyday low prices. The moral aspects of the marketplace have never been so contentious or consequential; however, the realm of economics is often treated as a world unto itself, a domain where human behavior is guided not by emotions, beliefs, moralities, or the passions that fascinate anthropologists but by the hard fact of rational choices. Anthropologists have historically tended to focus on the corrosive effects of markets on traditional lifeways and the ways in which global markets disadvantage marginalized peoples. Economists often have difficulty recognizing that markets are embedded in particular social and political power structures and that "free" market transactions are often less free than we might think. If anthropologists could view markets a bit more ecumenically and if economists could view them a bit more politically, then great value—cash on the table—could be found in bringing these perspectives together. 6 x 9 in., 344 pages, 15 figures., 5 tables. 
Price: 33.20 USD
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65 FISHER, MFK. How To Cook A Wolf.
North Point Press, San Francisco: 1988. 0865473366 / 9780865473362 s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Written to inspire courage in those daunted by wartimes shortages, How to Cook a Wolf continues to rally cooks during times of plenty, reminding them that providing sustenance requires more than putting food on the table. M. F. K. Fisher knew that the last thing hungry people needed were hints on cutting back and making do. Instead, she gives her readers license to dream, to experiment, to construct adventurous and delicious meals as a bulwark against a dreary, meager present. Her fine prose provides reason in itself to draw our chairs close to the hearth; we can still enjoy her company and her exhortations to celebrate life by eating well. M. F. K. Fisher (1908-1992) is the author of numerous books of essays and reminiscences, many of which have become American classics. surprises." Includes an Index. "I do not know of any one in the United States who writes better prose."- W. H. Auden "Poet of the appetites." - John Updike "She writes about fleeting tastes and feasts vividly, excitingly, sensuously, exquisitely. There is almost a wicked thrill in following her uninhibited track through the glories of the good life." - James Beard "She writes about food as others do about love, but rather better." - Clifton Fadiman "M.F.K. Fisher . . . brings onstage a peach or a brace of quail and shows us history, cities, fantasies, memories, emotions." - Patricia Storace, The New York Review of Books "M. F. K. Fisher is our greatest food writer because she puts food in the mount, the mind and the imagination all at the same time. Beyond the gastronomical bravura, she is a passionate woman; food is her metaphor." - Shana Alexander 
Price: 15.44 USD
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66 FISHER, MFK. How To Cook A Wolf.
North Point Press, San Francisco: 1988. 0865473366 / 9780865473362 s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Written to inspire courage in those daunted by wartimes shortages, How to Cook a Wolf continues to rally cooks during times of plenty, reminding them that providing sustenance requires more than putting food on the table. M. F. K. Fisher knew that the last thing hungry people needed were hints on cutting back and making do. Instead, she gives her readers license to dream, to experiment, to construct adventurous and delicious meals as a bulwark against a dreary, meager present. Her fine prose provides reason in itself to draw our chairs close to the hearth; we can still enjoy her company and her exhortations to celebrate life by eating well. M. F. K. Fisher (1908-1992) is the author of numerous books of essays and reminiscences, many of which have become American classics. surprises." Includes an Index. "I do not know of any one in the United States who writes better prose."- W. H. Auden "Poet of the appetites." - John Updike "She writes about fleeting tastes and feasts vividly, excitingly, sensuously, exquisitely. There is almost a wicked thrill in following her uninhibited track through the glories of the good life." - James Beard "She writes about food as others do about love, but rather better." - Clifton Fadiman "M.F.K. Fisher . . . brings onstage a peach or a brace of quail and shows us history, cities, fantasies, memories, emotions." - Patricia Storace, The New York Review of Books "M. F. K. Fisher is our greatest food writer because she puts food in the mount, the mind and the imagination all at the same time. Beyond the gastronomical bravura, she is a passionate woman; food is her metaphor." - Shana Alexander 
Price: 15.68 USD
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67 FORBES, STEVE & AMES, ELIZABETH. How Capitalism Will Save Us: Why Free People And Free Markets Are The Best Answer In Today's Economy.
Crown Business, New York: 2009. First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Very good condition. Inscribed by Steve Forbes. 
Is it fundamentally greedy and immoral, enabling the rich to get richer? Are free markets Darwinian places where the most ruthless crush smaller competitors, where vital products and services are priced beyond the ability of many people to afford them? Capitalism is the world's greatest economic success story. It is the most effective way to provide for the needs of people and foster the democratic and moral values of a free society. Yet the worst recession in decades has widely—and understandably—shaken people's faith in our system. Even before the current crisis, capitalism received a "bad rap" from a culture ambivalent about free markets and wealth creation. This crisis of confidence is preventing a full recognition of how we got into the mess we're in today—and why capitalism continues to be the best route to prosperity. How Capitalism Will Save Us transcends labels such as "conservative" and "liberal" by showing how the economy really works. When free people in free markets have energy to solve problems and meet the needs and wants of others, they turn scarcity into abundance and develop the innovations that are the foremost drivers of economic growth. The freedom of democratic capitalism is, for example, what enabled Henry Ford to take a plaything of the rich—the car—and transform it into something affordable to working people. In the capitalist system, economic growth doesn't mean more of the same — grinding out a few more widgets every year. It's about change to increase overall wealth and give more people the chance for a better life. Includes an Index. 
Price: 47.03 USD
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68 FRANK, ROBERT H. The Darwin Economy: Liberty, Competition, And The Common Good.
Princeton University Press, Princeton: 2011. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Who was the greater economist--Adam Smith or Charles Darwin? The question seems absurd. Darwin, after all, was a naturalist, not an economist. But Robert Frank, New York Times economics columnist and best-selling author of The Economic Naturalist, predicts that within the next century Darwin will unseat Smith as the intellectual founder of economics. The reason, Frank argues, is that Darwin's understanding of competition describes economic reality far more accurately than Smith's. And the consequences of this fact are profound. Indeed, the failure to recognize that we live in Darwin's world rather than Smith's is putting us all at risk by preventing us from seeing that competition alone will not solve our problems. Smith's theory of the invisible hand, which says that competition channels self-interest for the common good, is probably the most widely cited argument today in favor of unbridled competition--and against regulation, taxation, and even government itself. But what if Smith's idea was almost an exception to the general rule of competition? That's what Frank argues, resting his case on Darwin's insight that individual and group interests often diverge sharply. Far from creating a perfect world, economic competition often leads to "arms races," encouraging behaviors that not only cause enormous harm to the group but also provide no lasting advantages for individuals, since any gains tend to be relative and mutually offsetting. The good news is that we have the ability to tame the Darwin economy. The best solution is not to prohibit harmful behaviors but to tax them. By doing so, we could make the economic pie larger, eliminate government debt, and provide better public services, all without requiring painful sacrifices from anyone. That's a bold claim, Frank concedes, but it follows directly from logic and evidence that most people already accept. Robert H. Frank is an economics professor at Cornell's Johnson Graduate School of Management and a regular "Economic View" columnist for the New York Times, and a Distinguished Senior Fellow at Demos. His books, which have been translated into 22 languages, include The Winner-Take-All Society (with Philip Cook), The Economic Naturalist, Luxury Fever, What Price the Moral High Ground?, and Principles of Economics (with Ben Bernanke). "The premise of economist Adam Smith's 'invisible hand'--a tenet of market economics--is that competitive self-interest shunts benefits to the community. But that is the exception rather than the rule, argues writer Robert H. Frank. Charles Darwin's idea of natural selection is a more accurate reflection of how economic competition works . . . because individual and species benefits do not always coincide. Highlighting reasons for market failure and the need to cut waste, Frank argues that we can domesticate our wild economy by taxing higher-end spending and harmful industrial emissions." - Nature "[P]rovocative. . . . Frank is an economist for the rest of us. . . . [T]he Darwin Economy . . . focus[es] on one paradox of economic life: behavior which makes sense for a particular individual can harm the community as a whole." - Chrystia Freeland, Reuters "Frank's worthy and unfashionable aim is to argue the economic case for some forms of government regulation, to defend taxation, and even to advocate certain forms of tax increase." - Howard Davies, Times Higher Education 
Price: 25.60 USD
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69 FRANK, ROBERT H. The Darwin Economy: Liberty, Competition, And The Common Good.
Princeton University Press, Princeton: 2012. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Who was the greater economist--Adam Smith or Charles Darwin? The question seems absurd. Darwin, after all, was a naturalist, not an economist. But Robert Frank, New York Times economics columnist and best-selling author of The Economic Naturalist, predicts that within the next century Darwin will unseat Smith as the intellectual founder of economics. The reason, Frank argues, is that Darwin's understanding of competition describes economic reality far more accurately than Smith's. And the consequences of this fact are profound. Indeed, the failure to recognize that we live in Darwin's world rather than Smith's is putting us all at risk by preventing us from seeing that competition alone will not solve our problems. Smith's theory of the invisible hand, which says that competition channels self-interest for the common good, is probably the most widely cited argument today in favor of unbridled competition--and against regulation, taxation, and even government itself. But what if Smith's idea was almost an exception to the general rule of competition? That's what Frank argues, resting his case on Darwin's insight that individual and group interests often diverge sharply. Far from creating a perfect world, economic competition often leads to "arms races," encouraging behaviors that not only cause enormous harm to the group but also provide no lasting advantages for individuals, since any gains tend to be relative and mutually offsetting. The good news is that we have the ability to tame the Darwin economy. The best solution is not to prohibit harmful behaviors but to tax them. By doing so, we could make the economic pie larger, eliminate government debt, and provide better public services, all without requiring painful sacrifices from anyone. That's a bold claim, Frank concedes, but it follows directly from logic and evidence that most people already accept. Robert H. Frank is an economics professor at Cornell's Johnson Graduate School of Management and a regular "Economic View" columnist for the New York Times, and a Distinguished Senior Fellow at Demos. His books, which have been translated into 22 languages, include The Winner-Take-All Society (with Philip Cook), The Economic Naturalist, Luxury Fever, What Price the Moral High Ground?, and Principles of Economics (with Ben Bernanke). "The premise of economist Adam Smith's 'invisible hand'--a tenet of market economics--is that competitive self-interest shunts benefits to the community. But that is the exception rather than the rule, argues writer Robert H. Frank. Charles Darwin's idea of natural selection is a more accurate reflection of how economic competition works . . . because individual and species benefits do not always coincide. Highlighting reasons for market failure and the need to cut waste, Frank argues that we can domesticate our wild economy by taxing higher-end spending and harmful industrial emissions." - Nature "[P]rovocative. . . . Frank is an economist for the rest of us. . . . [T]he Darwin Economy . . . focus[es] on one paradox of economic life: behavior which makes sense for a particular individual can harm the community as a whole." - Chrystia Freeland, Reuters "Frank's worthy and unfashionable aim is to argue the economic case for some forms of government regulation, to defend taxation, and even to advocate certain forms of tax increase." - Howard Davies, Times Higher Education 
Price: 16.10 USD
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70 FRIEDMAN, BENJAMIN M. Day Of Reckoning: The Consequences Of American Economic Policy Under Reagan And After.
Random House, Inc., New York: 1988. 0394565533 / 9780394565538 h Hardcover with dustjacket. Very good condition. 
In this brilliantly argued book, Benjamin Friedman lays out the exact origins of our vast new debts, warns of their impact on individual Americans as well as the national consequences we face as a debtor nation. Includes an Index. 
Price: 5.61 USD
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71 FRIEDMAN, BENJAMIN M. Day Of Reckoning: The Consequences Of American Economic Policy Under Reagan And After.
Random House, New York: 1988. 0394565533 / 9780394565538 h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. The binding is beginning to collapse. Underlining and notes on some pages. 
In this brilliantly argued book, Benjamin Friedman lays out the exact origins of our vast new debts, warns of their impact on individual Americans as well as the national consequences we face as a debtor nation. Includes an Index. 
Price: 6.41 USD
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72 FRIEDMAN, MILTON WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF FRIEDMAN, ROSE D. Capitalism And Freedom.
University of Chicago Press, Chicago: 2002. Fortieth Anniversary Edition. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Selected by the Times Literary Supplement as one of the "hundred most influential books since the war." How can we benefit from the promise of government while avoiding the threat it poses to individual freedom? In this classic book, Milton Friedman provides the definitive statement of his immensely influential economic philosophy—one in which competitive capitalism serves as both a device for achieving economic freedom and a necessary condition for political freedom. The result is an accessible text that has sold well over half a million copies in English, has been translated into eighteen languages, and shows every sign of becoming more and more influential as time goes on. Contents Preface, 1982 Preface Introduction 1. The Relation Between Economic Freedom and Political Freedom 2. The Role of Government in a Free Society 3. The Control of Money 4. International Financial and Trade Arrangements 5. Fiscal Policy 6. The Role of Government in Education 7. Capitalism and Discrimination 8. Monopoly and the Social Responsibility of Business and Labor 9. Occupational Licensure 10. The Distribution of Income 11. Social Welfare Measures 12. Alleviation of Poverty 13. Conclusion Index 
Price: 16.86 USD
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73 FRIEDMAN, MILTON. Tax Limitation, Inflation & The Role Of Government.
The Fisher Institute, Dallas:1978. 0933028008 / 9780933028005 s Softcover. Fair condition. 
The 1976 Nobel Laureate in Economics takes a close look at America's free market system, tax limitation efforts and the causes of inflation and unemployment 
Price: 14.01 USD
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74 FRYDMAN, ROMAN & PHELPS, EDMUND S. (EDITORS). Rethinking Expectations: The Way Forward For Macroeconomics.
Princeton University Press, Princeton: 2013. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
This book originated from a 2010 conference marking the fortieth anniversary of the publication of the landmark "Phelps volume," Microeconomic Foundations of Employment and Inflation Theory, a book that is often credited with pioneering the currently dominant approach to macroeconomic analysis. However, in their provocative introductory essay, Roman Frydman and Edmund Phelps argue that the vast majority of macroeconomic and finance models developed over the last four decades derailed, rather than built on, the Phelps volume's "microfoundations" approach. Whereas the contributors to the 1970 volume recognized the fundamental importance of according market participants' expectations an autonomous role, contemporary models rely on the rational expectations hypothesis (REH), which rules out such a role by design. The financial crisis that began in 2007, preceded by a spectacular boom and bust in asset prices that REH models implied could never happen, has spurred a quest for fresh approaches to macroeconomic analysis. While the alternatives to REH presented in Rethinking Expectations differ from the approach taken in the original Phelps volume, they are notable for returning to its major theme: understanding aggregate outcomes requires according expectations an autonomous role. In the introductory essay, Frydman and Phelps interpret the various efforts to reconstruct the field--some of which promise to chart its direction for decades to come. The contributors include Philippe Aghion, Sheila Dow, George W. Evans, Roger E. A. Farmer, Roman Frydman, Michael D. Goldberg, Roger Guesnerie, Seppo Honkapohja, Katarina Juselius, Enisse Kharroubi, Blake LeBaron, Edmund S. Phelps, John B. Taylor, Michael Woodford, and Gylfi Zoega. Roman Frydman is professor of economics at New York University and the coauthor (with Michael D. Goldberg) of Beyond Mechanical Markets and Imperfect Knowledge Economics. Edmund S. Phelps, the winner of the 2006 Nobel Prize in Economics, is director of Columbia University's Center on Capitalism and Society. His many books include Structural Slumps and Seven Schools of Macroeconomic Thought. Endorsement: "The 1970 Phelps volume has been extremely influential in macroeconomics. Three of its contributors went on to win Nobel prizes for work detailed in the book, and it inspired many others who contributed to the small equilibrium models that became the workhorses of macroeconomics. Yet virtually all of these models use the assumption of rational expectations. In this new volume, Phelps and Roman Frydman assemble a new group of scholars to critique the work based on rational expectations. Phelps and Frydman argue that rational expectations destroyed one of the key premises of the original book--that independent expectations are critical for understanding macroeconomic phenomena. The contributors to this follow-up volume make a convincing case for the failure of several models with rational expectations, and present thought-provoking alternatives. Their efforts to build macroeconomic models without the rational expectations hypothesis might have the impact in their areas of research that the original volume had."--Christopher Pissarides, Nobel Laureate in Economics "Microeconomic Foundations of Employment and Inflation Theory, edited by Edmund Phelps forty years ago, established the concept of 'micro foundations' as an essential macroeconomics idea. Later, 'rational expectations' was added as the second pillar of the current standard macro model. Recent events have challenged the validity of that model. This new Phelps volume, coedited with Roman Frydman, challenges and offers alternatives to the second pillar while retaining the first. It is a must-read for anyone interested in modern economic thought and its implications for policy."--Dale Mortsensen, Nobel Laureate in Economics "A great volume."--Peter Howitt, Brown University 
Price: 71.25 USD
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75 FULLERTON, DON (EDITOR); WOLFRAM, CATHERINE (EDITOR). The Design And Implementation Of Us Climate Policy.
University of Chicago Press, Chicago and London: 2012. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Economic research on climate change has been crucial in advancing our understanding of the consequences associated with global warming as well as the costs and benefits of the various policies that might reduce emissions of greenhouse gases. As nations work to develop climate policies, economic insights into their design and implementation are ever more important. With a balance between theoretical and empirical approaches, The Design and Implementation of US Climate Policy looks at the possible effects of various climate policies on a range of economic outcomes. The studies that comprise the volume examine topics that include the coordination—or lack thereof—between the federal and state governments, implications of monitoring and enforcing climate policy, and the specific consequences of various climate policies for the agricultural, automotive, and buildings sectors. 
Price: 104.50 USD
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76 GALBRAITH, JOHN KENNETH. A Life In Our Times.
Houghton Mifflin Co., Boston: 1981. 0395305098 / 9780395305096 h Hardcover with dustjacket. Book is in very good condition but dustjacket has some tears and a small chip missing on backcover. 
Many have been close to great events and great leaders. Few have combined that proximity with the ability to write effectively, amusingly, even brilliantly about those events and people - about the great moments and the low moments, the great men and women and those who were only interesting, entertaining or absurd. Galbraith combines proximity with ability, as all who read this book will discover. Includes an Index. 
Price: 10.45 USD
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77 GALBRAITH, JOHN KENNETH. Economics And The Public Purpose.
Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston: 1973. 0395172063 / 9780395172063 Third Printing. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition but dustjacket is in only fair condition. 
The author brings together the small entrepreneur, the planning system of large firms, and the state as the instrument of the planning system and the public at large. Includes an Index. 
Price: 11.50 USD
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78 GALBRAITH, JOHN KENNETH. The Affluent Society.
New American Library: 1958. Seventh Printing. s Softcover. Reading copy. 
Reexamines issues that are a vital part of modern American life. A revolutionary study of the economics of opulence. Includes an Index. 
Price: 1.00 USD
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79 GALBRAITH, JOHN KENNETH. The Affluent Society.
New American Library: 1958. Seventh Printing. s Softcover. Reading copy. 
Reexamines issues that are a vital part of modern American life. A revolutionary study of the economics of opulence. Includes an Index. 
Price: 1.00 USD
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80 GALBRAITH, JOHN KENNETH. The Affluent Society.
New American Library, New York: 1958. Fourteenth Printing. s Softcover. Reading copy. 
Reexamines issues that are a vital part of modern American life. A revolutionary study of the economics of opulence. Includes an Index. 
Price: 1.00 USD
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