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LITERARY CRITICISM.

LITERARY CRITICISM.

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61 CAMPS, W. A. An Introduction To Virgil's Aeneid.
Oxford University Press, London: 1969. First Edition (Unstated). s Softcover. Good condition. 

Price: 66.98 USD
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62 CAPRI-KARKA, C. War In The Poetry Of George Seferis: A Poem-by-poem Analysis.
Pella Publishing, New York: 1985. 0918618274 / 9780918618276 First Edition (unstated). s Softcover. Good Condition. 
In the work of the poet Seferis, war, as reflected in his poetry, is the ultimate complication of the tragic human condition. It would, however, be a mistake to see in Seferis only his tragic sense of life and miss his message, his belief in balance and measure. Includes an Index. 
Price: 88.43 USD
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63 CARTER, C. ALLEN. Kenneth Burke And The Scapegoat Process.
University of Oklahoma, Norman: 1996. 0806128240 / 9780806128245 First Edition (Unstated). h Hardcover with dustjacket. Very good condition. 

Price: 140.60 USD
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64 CARY, RICHARD. Sarah Orne Jewett.
College and University Press, New Haven: 1962. First Edition (Unstated). Twayne's United States Authors Series. s Softcover. Good condition. 
After a preliminary biographical essay, the rest of the book is devoted to a discussion of Sarah Orne Jewett's woeks and an evaluation of her writing. Tje basic materials with which she chose to work are presented along with the themes she strove to illuminate, and the particular mode of balanced romance-realism in which she cloaked them. Includes an Index. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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65 CAVELL, STANLEY. The Senses Of Walden: An Expanded Edition.
North Point Press, San Francisco: 1981. 0865470324 / 9780865470323 Reprint Edition. s Softcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 
An invaluable companion volume to Walden. The first ripples made by Thoreau in Walden Pond are still widening, and this book extends them further into contemporary American thought. Also contains tow new essays on Ralph Waldo Emerson in this expanmded edition. 
Price: 51.78 USD
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66 CHACE, WILLIAM M. (EDITOR). Joyce: A Collection Of Critical Essays.
Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs: 1974. 0135112958 / 9780135112953 A Spectrum Book. First Printing. s Softcover. Good condition. 
Brings to gether some of the best examples of Joyce criticism. Includes essays by Edmund Wilson, Harry Levin, Richard Ellman and Lionel Trilling. 
Price: 20.28 USD
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67 CHAMBERS, FRANK MCMINN. Pmla, Publications Of The Modern Language Association Of America, Vol. Lx, No. 4, December, 1945: Lucan And The Antiquitez De Rome.
Modern Language Association of America, New York: 1945. Vol. 60, December 1945, No. 4. s Softcover. Good condition. 
English & French Languages, Literary Journal. 
Price: 9.50 USD
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68 CHAMETZY, JULES; HEATH, MARY & JENKINS (EDITORS). The Massachusetts Review - Summer 1998 Volume X X X I X, No. 2.
First Edition. s Softcover. Reading copy. 
A special issue in tribute to Allen Ginsberg and American Poetry. Includes a lengthy article entitled "Talking about Poems with Robert Frost" by William G. O'Donnell. 
Price: 33.96 USD
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69 CHATMAN, SEYMOUR (EDITOR & TRANSLATOR IN PART). Literary Style: A Symposium.
Oxford University Press, London and New York: 1971. First Edition (Unstated). h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Very good condition. 
Contains "Style and Its Image" by Roland Barthes; "Immanence and Transitivity of Stylistic Criteria" by Pierre Guiraud, "Style as Style" by Josephine Miles, "The Place of Style in the Structure of the Text" by Tzvetan Todorov, "On the Place of Style in Some Linguistic Theories" by Nils Erik Enkvist, "Stylistics, Poetics, and Criticism" by Rene Wellek, "Rhetorical Choice and Stylistic Option: The Conscious and Unconscious Poles" by Louis T. Milic, "Toward a Structural Theory of Content in Prose Fiction" by Lubomir Dolezel, "Philology: Factualness and History" by Karl D. Uitti, "Stylistics and Semantics" by Stephen Ulllman, "The Functions of Vocal Style" by Ivan Fonagy, "The Conventions of Poetry" by Samuel R. Levin, "The Rule and the Norm: Halle and Keyser on Chaucer's Meter" by W. K. Wimsatt, "The Textual Function of the French Article" by Harald Weinrich, "Speec h, Action, and Style" by Richard Ohmann, "Style and Expressive Register in Medieval Poetry" by Paul Zumithor, "The Style of Autobiography" by Jean Starobinski, "Rime and Reason in Literature" by Buqaiya Hasan, "Linguistic Function and Literary Style: An Inquiry into the Language of William Golding's The Inheritors, "Lyric Attitude and Pronominal Structure in the Poems of Eminescu" by Alexandru Niculescu, and "The Style of Montaigne: Word-Pairs and Word-Groups" by R. A. Sayce. Includes an Index. 
Price: 20.24 USD
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70 CHUTE, MARCHETTE; PERRIE, ERNESTINE; FRANCK, FREDRICK (DRAWINGS BY). The Worlds Of Shakespeare.
E. P. Dutton and Co., New York: 1963. First Edition. s Softcover. Reading copy. Name of former owner on cover page. 

Price: 19.00 USD
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71 CIRINO, MARK. Ernest Hemingway: Thought In Action.
The University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, Milwaukee and London: . Studies in American Thought and Culture Series. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
A new look at Hemingway, revealing a concern with consciousness similar to his predecessors and contemporaries William Faulkner, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Henry James, and Marcel Proust. Ernest Hemingway's groundbreaking prose style and examination of timeless themes made him one of the most important American writers of the twentieth century. Yet in Ernest Hemingway: Thought in Action, Mark Cirino observes "Literary criticism has accused Hemingway of many things but thinking too deeply is not one of them." Although much has been written abut the author's love of action - hunting, fishing, drinking, bullfighting, boxing, travel, and the moveable feast - Cirino looks at Hemingway's focus on the modern mind, paralleling the interest in the consciousness of such predecessors and contemporaries as Proust, Joyce, Woolf, Faulkner, and Henry James. Hemingway, Cimino demonstrates, probes the ways his characters' minds respond when placed in urgent situations or when damaged by past traumas. In Cirino's analysis of Hemingway's work through his lens - including such celebrated classics as A Farewell to Arms, The Old Man and the Sea, and "Big Two-Hearted River" and less-appreciated works including Islands in the Stream and "Because I Think Deeper" - an entirely different Hemingway hero emerges: intelligent, introspective and ruminative. Mark Cirino is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Evansville. He is the co-editor of Ernest Hemingway: Geography of Memory and the general editor of Kent State University Press's "Reading Hemingway" series. He is also the author of two novels, Name The Baby and Arizona Blues. "Cirino . . . collapses the distinction between thought and action that has traditionally typecast Hemingway, as anti-intellectual dolt - the 'he-man' of American literature." - Kirk Curnett, author of Coffee With Hemingway 
Price: 25.60 USD
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72 COLOGNE-BROOKES, GAVIN. The Novels Of William Styron: From Harmony To History.
Louisiana State University Press, Baton Rouge and London: 1995. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
In The Novels of William Styron, Gavin Cologne-Brookes presents the first comprehensive study of William Styron's work. Using the concept of narrative evolution, he illumines not only Styron's novels but also an entire genre. By examining the various narrative voices in Styron's fiction, Cologne-Brookes traces a gradual shift away form modernist forms of aesthetic experimentation and personal isolation toward an engagement with society and history. In Lie Down in Darkness and The Long March, the authorial point of view reveals art as a strategy for achieving personal order in a strife-filled world. That perspective, however, is gradually undermined in Set This House on Fire and The Confessions of Nat Turner, and finally satirized in Sophie's Choice. Styron's early narrators seek to mold the conflicting voices of their stories into harmony. As, under the influence of Albert Camus and George Orwell, his work begins to confront political and historical issues - slavery, the Holocaust - the impulse toward harmony is weakened and finally dispelled. Cologne-Brookes shows that Styron confirms his change of direction in his more recent writing-the essays in This Quiet Dusk; his retrospective comments on his work in Darkness Visible; the stories in A Tidewater Morning; and his work-in-progress, The Way of the Warrior. He also links Styron to other American whose works equally suggest a firm sense of the novel's role in political and historical debate. Drawing on the theories of Mikhail Bakhtin and Georg Lukacs, Cologne-Brookes acknowledges previous Styron criticism - with its emphasis on Freudian, existentialist, and southern concerns-but offers new perspectives on Styron's importance. He considers Styron not so much a southern writer as one whose influences include southern roots. Critically incisive and entirely convincing, The Novels of William Styron will prove to be an essential book for Styron scholars, students of his work and anyone with an interest in contemporary writing. In arguing that his important novelist's work becomes more significant as it becomes more historically involved, Cologne-Brookes also addresses the vital questions of where, when, and how the novel form is important. Gavin Cologne-Brookes is the author of Dark Eyes on America: The Novels of Joyce Carol Oates and coeditor of Writing and America. Educated in his native Britain and in the United States, he is an associate professor of English and creative studies at Bath Spa University in England. 
Price: 44.60 USD
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73 COMMAGER, STEELE. The Odes Of Horace: A Critical Study.
Indiana University Press, Bloomington & London: 1967. Midland Books Edition. s Softcover. Very good condition. 
A critical examination of the Odes in which particular attention is paid to the language and structure of the poetry. The author applies his conclusions to the patterns of thought characteristic of Horace's writing as a whole, and although chiefly concerned with the Odes, makes references also to the Satires, Epistles, and Epodes. Includes an Index. 
Price: 49.54 USD
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74 CONRAD, JOSEPH; DEAN, LEONARD F. Joseph Conrad's Heart Of Darkness: Backgrounds And Criticisms.
Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs: 1960. Ninth printing. s Softcover. Good condition. 
A collection of backgrounds and criticisms that will help the reader to call upon his or her own creative resources in understanding Conrad's story and its setting in the Belgian Congo. Included are documents of Conrad's actual journey to Africa and his trip up the Congo, with parallel descriptions of the region bby such experience observers as H. M. Stanley and Sir Roger Casement. Includes the entire text of Heart of Darkness. 
Price: 18.53 USD
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75 CORTON, CHRISTINE L. London Fog: The Biography.
Belknap Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts and London England: 2015. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
On the BBC World Service program Weekend, listen to Christine Corton discuss the origins of London's legendary fog—and how it seeped into London's literature: In popular imagination, London is a city of fog. The classic London fogs, the thick yellow "pea-soupers," were born in the industrial age of the early nineteenth century. The first globally notorious instance of air pollution, they remained a constant feature of cold, windless winter days until clean air legislation in the 1960s brought about their demise. Christine L. Corton tells the story of these epic London fogs, their dangers and beauty, and their lasting effects on our culture and imagination. As the city grew, smoke from millions of domestic fires, combined with industrial emissions and naturally occurring mists, seeped into homes, shops, and public buildings in dark yellow clouds of water droplets, soot, and sulphur dioxide. The fogs were sometimes so thick that people could not see their own feet. By the time London's fogs lifted in the second half of the twentieth century, they had changed urban life. Fogs had created worlds of anonymity that shaped social relations, providing a cover for crime, and blurring moral and social boundaries. They had been a gift to writers, appearing famously in the works of Charles Dickens, Henry James, Oscar Wilde, Robert Louis Stevenson, Joseph Conrad, and T. S. Eliot. Whistler and Monet painted London fogs with a fascination other artists reserved for the clear light of the Mediterranean. Corton combines historical and literary sensitivity with an eye for visual drama—generously illustrated here—to reveal London fog as one of the great urban spectacles of the industrial age. 408 pages, 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches, 28 color illustrations, 63 halftones. Christine L. Corton is a Senior Member of Wolfson College, Cambridge, and a freelance writer. She worked for many years at publishing houses in London. "Christine Corton takes a subject that is now scarcely more than a heritage item—like gaslight and hansom cabs—and puts it where it belongs among the great public-health movements of the 19th and 20th centuries… Of course, fog was not solely a public-health problem. With the help of wonderful contemporary illustrations, Corton vividly describes the chaos it brought—pedestrians groping, traffic crawling, accidents, crime and drunkenness soaring. The melting, blurring, looming transformations of fog seemed to symbolize the dissolution of society itself. Writers saw the possibilities, and Corton pursues their metaphorical fogs through every kind of moral, psychological and social disintegration. Charles Dickens, Henry James, Joseph Conrad, Robert Louis Stevenson, all are here—plus a mass of fascinating and forgotten popular literature—their cultural meanings perceptively analyzed… This is a rich and multifaceted book."—The Economist "Engrossing and magnificently researched… Corton's book combines meticulous social history with a wealth of eccentric detail. Thus we learn that London's ubiquitous plane trees were chosen for their shiny, fog-resistant foliage. And since Jack the Ripper actually went out to stalk his victims on fog-free nights, filmmakers had to fake the sort of dank, smoke-wreathed London scenes audiences craved. It's discoveries like these that make reading London Fog such an unusual, enthralling and enlightening experience."—Miranda Seymour, The New York Times Book Review "Corton's eye for social history is superb. We are led with wit and intelligence through a London in which clerks in counting-houses are forbidden to leave their books lying open lest the sooty fogs blacken the pages… Corton is excellent on the extent to which, in the twentieth century and since, the close association between Victorian London and Gothic fog has clouded perceptions of Victorian life and art."—Richard Smyth, The Times Literary Supplement "In Christine L. Corton's beautifully illustrated London Fog: The Biography, the mysterious mist takes center stage in all its noxious, stygian, primeval delicacy…Drawing on novels and poems, paintings and films, Corton's [book] is crammed with thought-provoking elucidations. It sounds hokey to say it, but she has shed a bright light on the fog."—Alexandra Mullen, The Wall Street Journal "Corton's wonderfully detailed and original exploration of foggy London ranges from the earliest mists to the last great pea-souper of 1962… Her account is rich in memorable anecdotes and descriptions, gleaned from popular culture, literature, journals and contemporary letters as well as cartoons and art history: the book is also splendidly illustrated."—P. D. Smith, The Guardian "Brilliant… Corton has a deft historical, literary and visual eye. While tracing the birth, maturity and death of fog, she pays careful attention to the ways it affected everyday lives and locations… But her real interest is in the way fog played in the imagination. For centuries, she shows, novelists, essayists, cartoonists and painters used fog as a metaphor for human relationships and the moral order… Corton's book is an unsentimental and elegant reflection on a world that has passed."—Joanna Bourke, The Daily Telegraph "In London Fog, Christine L. Corton guides us through the history of the 'pea-souper' (the phrase first used in print in 1849 by Herman Melville); from Victorian women, fearful of attack in the impenetrable murk, to the poets, artists and film-makers who thrived on its metaphorical potential; from the political rows over domestic coal fires to the dreadful 1952 Great Smog which claimed thousands of lives and was so thick that, even indoors, office workers could not see to the end of the corridor."—Sinclair McKay, The Daily Telegraph "London's 'pea-soupers'—opaque, yellowish smogs—were an environmental catastrophe, a cloak for nefarious activities and an artistic inspiration. An odiferous wig of soot from coal fires, sulfur dioxide and mist settled regularly over the city from the 1840s to the 1960s. In this richly nuanced history, scholar Christine Corton takes us from polymath Robert Hooke spotting a pall of smoke over London in 1676 through the killer fogs that felled zoo animals, spurred crime and caused traffic accidents, and that ultimately galvanized scientists and the government to craft the 1956 Clean Air Act."—Barbara Kiser, Nature "Endlessly entertaining… Corton has done a prodigious amount of research into the phenomenon of the 'pea-soup' fogs that enveloped London at regular intervals throughout the Industrial Age… Corton's book is merrily chock-full of illustrations… But the real star attraction in these pages is Corton's exuberant omniscience about her subject. She seems to have read every tenth-rate serialized novel in the whole of the Victorian and Edwardian literary shrubbery, hunting out every mention and dramatization of the great fogs and in the process giving some truly wretched writers what will surely be the most intelligent reading they're ever likely to get. And she's got an equally good ear for reportage, finding piercing quotes from every era of the fog's domination… London Fog has enjoyed a nicely wide critical reception since its appearance, and it deserves every accolade it gets. This is tight-focus popular history at its finest."—Steve Donoghue, Open Letters Monthly "The idea of a biography of fog in London might initially appear a doubtful enterprise, but in Christine Corton's capable hands it works brilliantly. The liveliness of metropolitan fog is beautifully charted here in a long chronology from the Stuart era to the Clean Air Acts of the 1950s to 1990s… [A] most extraordinarily rich collection of material from scientific, journalistic, literary, humorous, artistic and medical sources… She has created a history of fog's material and immaterial culture… The text is interspersed with some astonishing visual material, appropriately placed, making the book a visual feast especially of little-known artworks, caricatures and photographs of great beauty. Corton's use of the perceptions of foreign visitors, especially those from China and Japan, is revelatory… London Fog is not just a literary exercise; it also charts the long trajectory of a deeply serious public health matter that we have yet to confront, as we should, once again… This fine book has real substance, generously shared, and is very timely indeed."—Ruth Richardson, Times Higher Education "[Corton's] fascinating history traces London's unique brand of photochemical smog from its surprisingly early birth in the 13th century, when complaints about the burning of 'sea coal' in London hearths began, through its malign maturity in the 19th, to its death throes in the second half of the 20th… The many well-chosen images in London Fog include works by minor painters of London scenes and by various illustrators, photojournalists and cartoonists playing on the terror, confusion and comedy caused by fog. These add greatly to the interest of Corton's book."—Catherine Peters, Literary Review "Christine Corton's excellent book explores three questions: how people accounted for London fog, what they did about it, and how it became such an enormous, apparently inexhaustible cultural resource and metaphor… Corton has assembled an astonishing display of fog fiction… Corton has written a thoughtful, vivid, very memorable book."—Neal Ascherson, London Review of Books "It's a definite must-read for anyone concerned with air quality and environmental history."—Ashley Macey, Brit + Co. "Ambitious… The book is substantial, well illustrated and beautifully written, with approachable scholarship… [An] illuminating book."—Philippa Stockley, Country Life "Christine L. Corton's London Fog is an illuminating expedition through the literal and metaphorical meanings of pollution in the company of such artists as Dickens, Conrad, Monet and Hitchcock."—Mark Sanderson, Evening Standard "What makes Christine Corton's London Fog: The Biography special is that it demystifies the sulphurous yellow mass that once plagued the city. In this nicely written and beautifully illustrated book, fog gets its proper due as the coal-laden, murderous monstrosity it really was, beloved of novelists from Dickens to Stevenson."—Philippa Stockley, Evening Standard [11/19/15] "[A] thorough and enjoyable book, not only for its historical account of what London fog was and when it began but for the rich seam of literature, spleen and death that they caused."—Philippa Stockley, Evening Standard [11/05/15] "The sheer scale of the pollution described by Corton is hard to grasp… Corton leads the way, like a linklighter of old, through the poisonous clouds of times gone by, and arrives, eventually, at present day Oxford Street, where nitrogen dioxide concentrations are 'worse than they are anywhere on earth.'"—Charlie Gilmour, The Independent on Sunday "Excellent, if dark."—The Lady "This is an unexpectedly riveting book, scholarly, thorough yet eminently readable."—Londonist "No one, not even the most frenzied fog obsessive, could find fault with Christine Corton's thoroughness. Wherever there's a reference to fog in nature or art, she seems to have tracked it down. But her book is far more than just a glorified laundry list of foggy facts. Rather it's a genuine biography in which she very cleverly treats fog less as an atmospheric phenomenon and more as though it's a real character—sinister, beautiful and elusive, but no less fascinating for that."—John Preston, The Mail on Sunday "Christine L. Corton, clad in an overcoat, with a linklighter before her, takes us into the gloomier, long 19th century, where she revels in its Gothic grasp. Beautifully illustrated, London Fog delves fascinatingly into that swirling miasma."—Philip Hoare, New Statesman "Christine Corton's absorbing and handsomely produced book directs a steady beam at both the phenomenon and the place that made [fog] famous: London."—Anthony Quinn, The Observer "If you want to know every last thing to know about London fog—the toxic, impenetrable moist soot that used to blanket the city in the winter—this is the book for you. Even to an outsider, it is fascinating, even astonishing, that the English put up for so long with a condition that killed people and often caused commerce to grind to a halt."—Donald D. Breed, The Providence Journal "A thoroughly researched and generally enjoyable account of the social, natural and cultural history of the peasoupers, from their first appearance in the early 1800s to the final fog of 1962."—David B. Williams, The Seattle Times "As Christine L. Corton shows in her lively and engaging cultural history, for more than 100 years London fog did not only creep into people's homes and bodies. It saturated their way of thinking. If fog was an inescapable part of city life—in Dickens's famous opening to Bleak House, the word is repeated so often it sounds more like a curse—it was an equally omnipresent element in the cultural imagination."—Robert Douglas-Fairhurst, The Spectator "This detailed, well-researched study is copiously illustrated with prints, cartoons, paintings and photos of the metropolitan health hazard. It is the photos which convince us that it was not a myth… London fog became inextricably linked with the image of the Victorian capital. Sherlock Holmes, Jack the Ripper and Soames Forsyte all loom out at us from the past, under gaslight, wreathed in fog… The best place to read this engrossing but goose-bump-making book is under a sunshade on a Mediterranean beach in mid August."—Robert Carver, The Tablet "[An] engrossing book… This book could almost make one nostalgic for the days of the pea souper were it not for the fact that it was clearly a terrible threat to health."—Daisy Goodwin, The Times "London Fog: The Biography successfully captures the enormous impact this atmospheric had on a major city's everyday life. Ironically, the result is a portrait that is both well-defined and sharply delineated."—Amy Henderson, The Weekly Standard "An intriguing biography of the weather effect that defined a national character… An eye-opening and highly readable picture of London's reactions to the killer fog that has characterized it for centuries."—Kirkus Reviews "Corton undertakes a definitive study of London's 'pea-souper' fogs, deftly tracing the history of a weather condition that became a defining feature of the city in the world's imagination. As Corton shows, the fog, which first appeared early in the 19th century, proved a ready metaphor for an array of Victorian anxieties, from Jack the Ripper's reign of terror to a perceived decline in public morals. She perceptively examines the literary manifestations of these fears in chapters covering a number of famous authors, including Charles Dickens, Robert Louis Stevenson, and T.S. Eliot. Readers may be surprised that the history of London fog requires a detour through the politics of the day as much as through literature; however, Corton proves a sensible guide through the labyrinthine parliamentary measures arising from public outrage over the 'great killer fog' and bureaucratic inaction in service of the manufacturers that were largely responsible for the pollution. Though the 'London particular' was finally legislated out of existence in the 1960s, Corton asserts convincingly that the fog will remain enshrined in cultural memory, a romantic if no longer accurate symbol of a great city."—Publishers Weekly "In the history of London, the Fog is a character in its own right. Now along comes a biography to do justice to this mysterious entity. Christine Corton's London Fog is a valuable addition to the London canon."—Catharine Arnold, author of Bedlam London and its Mad "An admirable and enjoyable book, full of exemplary research. The writing is always clear and accessible, even breezy."—Jerry White, University of London "One of the most characteristic and important features of London was its 'pea-souper' fogs, or smogs, which determined so many aspects of Londoners' lives until the 1950s—crime, romance, commerce, and of course, health. A comprehensive work on the impact and influence of fog upon the denizens of London is overdue."—Anthony Wohl, Vassar College "This anatomy of the impenetrable London pea-souper—from Dickens to modern times—is a delight. It is beautifully written, its historical learning is lightly worn, and its literary insights are intelligent, entertaining, and apt."—Andrew Lycett 
Price: 33.25 USD
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76 COX, JAMES H. Muting White Noise: Native American And European American Novel Traditions.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2009. First Paperback Edition. Volume 51 in the American Indian Literature and Critical Studies Series. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
A critical examination of key novels by and about American Indians. Native American fiction writers have confronted Euro-American narratives about Indians and the colonial world those narratives help create. These Native authors offer stories in which Indians remake this colonial world by resisting conquest and assimilation, sustaining their cultures and communities, and surviving. In Muting White Noise, James H. Cox considers how Native authors have liberated our imaginations from colonial narratives. Cox takes his title from Sherman Alexie, for whom the white noise of a television set represents the white mass-produced culture that mutes American Indian voices. By foregrounding the work of Native intellectuals in his readings of the American Indian novel tradition, Cox develops a critical perspective from which to re-see the role played by the Euro-American novel tradition in justifying and enabling colonialism. Cox also offers "red readings" of several revered Euro-American novels, including Herman Melville's Moby-Dick. Muting White Noise breaks new ground in literary criticism. It stands with Native authors in their struggle to reclaim their own narrative space and tell stories that empower and nurture, rather than undermine and erase, American Indians and their communities. Assistant Professor of English at the University of Texas at Austin, James H. Cox specializes in Native American and American literature. He also serves as a coeditor of SAIL (Studies in American Indian Literatures). 
Price: 23.70 USD
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77 COX, JAMES H. Muting White Noise: Native American And European American Novel Traditions.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2006. 0806136790 / 9780806136790 First Paperback Edition. Volume 51 in the American Indian Literature and Critical Studies Series. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
A critical examination of key novels by and about American Indians. Native American fiction writers have confronted Euro-American narratives about Indians and the colonial world those narratives help create. These Native authors offer stories in which Indians remake this colonial world by resisting conquest and assimilation, sustaining their cultures and communities, and surviving. In Muting White Noise, James H. Cox considers how Native authors have liberated our imaginations from colonial narratives. Cox takes his title from Sherman Alexie, for whom the white noise of a television set represents the white mass-produced culture that mutes American Indian voices. By foregrounding the work of Native intellectuals in his readings of the American Indian novel tradition, Cox develops a critical perspective from which to re-see the role played by the Euro-American novel tradition in justifying and enabling colonialism. Cox also offers "red readings" of several revered Euro-American novels, including Herman Melville's Moby-Dick. Muting White Noise breaks new ground in literary criticism. It stands with Native authors in their struggle to reclaim their own narrative space and tell stories that empower and nurture, rather than undermine and erase, American Indians and their communities. Assistant Professor of English at the University of Texas at Austin, James H. Cox specializes in Native American and American literature. He also serves as a coeditor of SAIL (Studies in American Indian Literatures). 
Price: 28.45 USD
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78 COX. STEPHEN. Love And Logic: The Evolution Of Blake's Thought.
University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor: 1992. 0472103040 / 9780472103041 First Edition (Unstated). h Hardcover with dustjacket. Very good condition. 
A fresh and readable explanation of Blake's major work that explores the relationship between love and logic in his writing. Includes an Index. 
Price: 70.78 USD
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79 CROCE, BENEDETTO. The Poetry Of Dante.
Paul P. Appel, Mamaroneck: 1971. 0911858121 / 9780911858129 First Reprint Edition by Paul P. Appel. h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Very good condition. 
A critique of The Divine Comedy by one of Italy's most outstanding thinkers of the twentieth century. Translated into English from the Italian by Douglas Ainslie. Includes an Index. 
Price: 38.00 USD
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80 CULLER, JONATHAN. On Deconstruction: Theory And Criticism After Structuralism.
Cornell University Press, Ithaca: 1983. 0801492017 / 9780801492013 Second Printing. s Softcover. Good condition. 
Discusses the theory and criticism of recent years, focusing on deconstruction as the principal source of energy and innovation. Offers a detailed exposition of its ideas and methods, defining its relation to other strands of contemporary criticism, and assessing its implications for literary studies. Includes an Index. 
Price: 5.94 USD
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