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1 CUVI, PABLO. In The Eyes Of My People: Stories And Photos Of Journeys Through Ecuador.
Dinediciones/ Grijalbo, Quito: 1988. 9978956077 / 9789978956076 First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 
Contains stories accompanied by photographs of the author's travels through Ecuador. 
Price: 71.49 USD
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2 KANE, JOE. Savages.
Alfred A. Knopf, New York: 1995. First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Very good condition. 
A firsthand account of how one small band of Amazonian warriors defended their territory against hell-bent oil companies, dogged missionaries, and starry-eyed environmentalists. "Joe Kane's Savages is exciting and incisive . . . a gripping read!" -- Mark J. Plotkin, Ph.D, ethnobotanist and author of Tales of a Shaman's Apprentice 
Price: 7.51 USD
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3 KLING, KEVIN (PHOTOGRAPHS); KLING, KEVIN & CHRISTENSEN, NADIA (TEXT). Ecuador: Island Of The Andes.
Thames and Hudson, London: 1988. 050001440X / 9780500014400 Originally published in France as Equateur, Ile des Indes in 1987 by Editions du Chene, Paris. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 
Captures for us the nuancesnand riches of this small world that is the very embodiment of the Andes in miniature: the broad curves of volcanic hills and their subtle hues ocher and green; the dense texture of the Indians' hair; the intensity of their gaze; the dazzling colors of their clothing. Contains 100 color photographs and a map. 
Price: 69.70 USD
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4 LOURIE, PETER. Sweat Of The Sun, Tears Of The Moon: A Chronicle Of An Incan Treasure.
Atheneum, New York: 1991. 0689121113 / 9780689121111 First Printing. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Very good condition. 
While dutifully completing some anthropological field work in Ecuador, Peter Lourie first heard of a fabled Incan treasure. From that moment his life was transformed. Filled with the passions and dreams of his fellow seekers, as well as Lourie's own strong affection for a country he describes as "exactly as it had been a hundred years before - unspoiled and full of cowboy flair," Sweat of the Sun, Tears of the Moon is also the stirring chronicle of one young man's rite of passage, as grows before our eyes into the bold teller of this absorbing tale, a writer of singular authority. "The farther I read, the more deeply engrossed I found myself in this straightforward tale of treasure. No wonder people keep looking, and always want to learn more." - Joseph Heller 
Price: 11.83 USD
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5 MUELAS, FEDERICO. Cuenca: Terre De Surprises Et Enchantments.
Editorial Everes: 1967. h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Very good reading copy. 
Spanish Text 
Price: 8.55 USD
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6 NEWSON, LINDA A. Life And Death In Early Colonial Ecuador.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: . h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Life and Death in Early Colonial Ecuador is the first book to describe demographic change throughout Ecuador during the early colonial period. It is also the first to examine in detail the impact of Inca conquest and demographic changes on the area in the early sixteenth century, a period for which there is a paucity of reliable records. Linda A. Newson identifies variations in demographic trends by examining the differing impacts of disease, pre-existing cultures, Inca rule, and Spanish administration and economic activities on the three regions of Ecuador - the highlands, coast, and eastern lowlands. The size and distribution of native populations today reflect five hundred years of demographic and cultural change. The first century of Spanish rule was the most formative. During that period, Old World diseases reduced Indian populations to levels from which few have recovered fully. Further, Spanish colonizers ill-treated and overworked Indians and exploited their lands and resources. Intense Spanish settlement and commericial forms of production, for example, had disastrous consequences for native peoples. That some Indian societies were better able to survive than others, Newson stresses, can be explained largely in terms of differences in the size and character of native populations at the time of Spanish conquest and in the resources to be found in the areas they inhabited. Newson's research is supported by her extensive use of archival sources in Spain and Ecuador as well as Jesuit and Franciscan sources in Rome. The book includes eighteen maps and thirty-two tables. 
Price: 47.45 USD
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7 RIVAL, LAURA. Huaorani Transformations In Twenty-first-century Ecuador: Treks Into The Future Of Time.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2016. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
The indigenous people of the Amazon Basin known as the Huaorani are one of the world's most intriguing peoples. The community of just under four thousand in Ecuador has been known to the public primarily for their historical identity as a violent society. But Laura Rival reveals the Huaorani in all their humanity and creativity through a longitudinal ethnography, bringing a deeper perspective beyond the stereotype. Rival's intimate knowledge of Huaorani culture spans twenty-five years. Here in a collection of broad-ranging essays, she offers a fascinating and provocative study. The first section, "Among Forest Beings," shows that the Huaorani have long adapted to life in the tropical rain forest with minimal reliance on horticulture, yet have developed a complex relationship with plants. In "In the Longhouse," the second section, Rival focuses on the intimate relations that create human persons and enact kinship relations. She also discusses women's lives and perspectives. The third section, "In the Midst of Enemies," considers how Huaorani society fits in larger political and economic contexts, illustrating how native values shape their encounters with oil companies, the state, and other external forces. Rival carefully analyzes insider/outsider dialectics wherein Huaorani people re-create meaningful and valued worlds in the face of alien projects, such as petroleum development, carbon trading, or intercultural education. Capitalizing on the author's decades-long study and interactions in the community, Huaorani Transformations in Twenty-First-Century Ecuador brings new insights to the Huaorani's unique way of relating to humans, to other-than-humans, and to the forest landscape they have inhabited for centuries. "A fascinating and provocative study of one of the world's most intriguing native groups."—Beth A. Conklin, author of Consuming Grief: Compassionate Cannibalism in an Amazonian Society "Reflecting on both the transformations of history and anthropological theory, Laura Rival adroitly reveals the underlying connections between Huaorani interactions with the rainforest, relations with neighboring societies, and responses to the conservationists and oil companies wrestling over their territory." —Stuart Kirsch, author of Mining Capitalism: The Relationship Between Corporations and Their Critics "Rival uses the Huaorani case to discuss the developments in cultural anthropology since the mid-20th century, and places her analysis within several anthropological debates."—CHOICE Connect 
Price: 61.75 USD
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8 UZENDOSKI, MICHAEL A.; CALAPUCHA-TAPUY, EDITH FELICIA. The Ecology Of The Spoken Word: Amazonian Storytelling And Shamanism Among The Napo Runa.
University of Illinois Press, Urbana and Chicago: 2015. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Beyond words, exploring Quichua aesthetic expression The Ecology of the Spoken Word offers the first theoretical and experiential translation of Napo Runa mythology in English. Michael A. Uzendoski and Edith Felicia Calapucha-Tapuy present and analyze lowland Quichua speakers in the Napo province of Ecuador through narratives, songs, curing chants, and other oral performances, so readers may come to understand and appreciate Napo Runa aesthetic expression. Like many other indigenous peoples, the Napo Runa create meaning through language and other practices that do not correspond to the communicative or social assumptions of Western culture. Language itself is only a part of a communicative world that includes plants, animals, and the landscape. In the Napo Runa worldview, storytellers are shamans who use sound and form to create relationships with other people and beings from the natural and spirit worlds. Guiding readers into Napo Runa ways of thinking and being, Uzendoski and Calapucha-Tapuy weave exacting translations into an interpretive argument with theoretical implications for understanding oral traditions, literacy, new technologies, and language. Reinforcing the authors' argument that words are only a small part of storytelling reality, a companion website with photos, audio files, and videos of original performances offers readers an opportunity to more deeply understand the beauty of performance and complexity of sound in Native Amazonian verbal expression. Michael A. Uzendoski is a professor in the Department of Anthropology, History, and Humanities at the Facultad Latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales (FLACSO), Ecuador, and the author of The Napo Runa of Amazonian Ecuador. Edith Felicia Calapucha-Tapuy is a native of Napo, Ecuador, and a translator of Napo Quichua stories and songs "An enlightening contribution for anyone interested in storytelling, Amazonian culture, or Quichua language."--Journal of Folklore Research "A fascinating and successful study of an oral tradition, with implications far beyond the Amazonian context."--Anthropology Review Database "Ought to adorn the shelves not only of Amazonianists and ethnomusicologists, but also of anyone, anthropologist or otherwise, who is interested in the history and practice of story-telling in all its various, equally beautiful and equally valid forms."--Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute "The Ecology of the Spoken Word is one of the most successful attempts to communicate the beauty and untranslatability of mythology to emerge from Amazonian ethnography."--Journal of the Anthropological Society of Oxford "The Ecology of the Spoken Word makes a very significant contribution to the fields of Amazonian Quichua ethnoaesthetics and linguistic culture. The work is stimulating, exciting, and provocative, and the documentation is excellent. This book will be useful to cultural anthropologists and others interested in applied education and public policy-related disciplines because it helps clarify how knowledge is conceived by the Quichua people."--Janis B. Nuckolls, author of Lessons from a Quechua Strongwoman: Ideophony, Dialogue, and Perspective "This work is exceptional for its depth of understanding and the details of presentation. The authors offer a new take on orality and storytelling by addressing debates in orality versus literacy and connecting them with South Americanist anthropology of indigenous cosmology, translation studies, verse-analysis, and ethnopoetics."--Alexander D. King, author of Living with Koryak Traditions: Playing with Culture in Siberia 
Price: 23.75 USD
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9 UZENDOSKI, MICHAEL A.; CALAPUCHA-TAPUY, EDITH FELICIA. The Ecology Of The Spoken Word: Amazonian Storytelling And Shamanism Among The Napo Runa.
University of Illinois Press, Urbana and Chicago: 2012. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Beyond words, exploring Quichua aesthetic expression The Ecology of the Spoken Word offers the first theoretical and experiential translation of Napo Runa mythology in English. Michael A. Uzendoski and Edith Felicia Calapucha-Tapuy present and analyze lowland Quichua speakers in the Napo province of Ecuador through narratives, songs, curing chants, and other oral performances, so readers may come to understand and appreciate Napo Runa aesthetic expression. Like many other indigenous peoples, the Napo Runa create meaning through language and other practices that do not correspond to the communicative or social assumptions of Western culture. Language itself is only a part of a communicative world that includes plants, animals, and the landscape. In the Napo Runa worldview, storytellers are shamans who use sound and form to create relationships with other people and beings from the natural and spirit worlds. Guiding readers into Napo Runa ways of thinking and being, Uzendoski and Calapucha-Tapuy weave exacting translations into an interpretive argument with theoretical implications for understanding oral traditions, literacy, new technologies, and language. Reinforcing the authors' argument that words are only a small part of storytelling reality, a companion website with photos, audio files, and videos of original performances offers readers an opportunity to more deeply understand the beauty of performance and complexity of sound in Native Amazonian verbal expression. Michael A. Uzendoski is a professor in the Department of Anthropology, History, and Humanities at the Facultad Latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales (FLACSO), Ecuador, and the author of The Napo Runa of Amazonian Ecuador. Edith Felicia Calapucha-Tapuy is a native of Napo, Ecuador, and a translator of Napo Quichua stories and songs "An enlightening contribution for anyone interested in storytelling, Amazonian culture, or Quichua language."--Journal of Folklore Research "A fascinating and successful study of an oral tradition, with implications far beyond the Amazonian context."--Anthropology Review Database "Ought to adorn the shelves not only of Amazonianists and ethnomusicologists, but also of anyone, anthropologist or otherwise, who is interested in the history and practice of story-telling in all its various, equally beautiful and equally valid forms."--Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute "The Ecology of the Spoken Word is one of the most successful attempts to communicate the beauty and untranslatability of mythology to emerge from Amazonian ethnography."--Journal of the Anthropological Society of Oxford "The Ecology of the Spoken Word makes a very significant contribution to the fields of Amazonian Quichua ethnoaesthetics and linguistic culture. The work is stimulating, exciting, and provocative, and the documentation is excellent. This book will be useful to cultural anthropologists and others interested in applied education and public policy-related disciplines because it helps clarify how knowledge is conceived by the Quichua people."--Janis B. Nuckolls, author of Lessons from a Quechua Strongwoman: Ideophony, Dialogue, and Perspective "This work is exceptional for its depth of understanding and the details of presentation. The authors offer a new take on orality and storytelling by addressing debates in orality versus literacy and connecting them with South Americanist anthropology of indigenous cosmology, translation studies, verse-analysis, and ethnopoetics."--Alexander D. King, author of Living with Koryak Traditions: Playing with Culture in Siberia 
Price: 49.40 USD
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