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LAOS.

LAOS.

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1 BRANFMAN, FRED (EDITOR) WITH ESSAYS & DRAWINGS BY LAOTIAN VILLAGERS; MCCOY, ALFRED W. (FOREWORD). Voices From The Plain Of Jars: Life Under An Air War.
The University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, Milwaukee and London: 2013. Second Edition. New Perspectives in Southeast Asian Studies Series. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
During the Vietnam War the United States government waged a massive, secret air war in neighboring Laos. Fred Branfman, an educational advisor living in Laos at the time, interviewed over 1,000 Laotian survivors. Shocked by what he heard and saw, he urged them to record their experiences in essays, poems, and pictures. Voices from the Plain of Jars was the result of that effort. When first published in 1972, this book was instrumental in exposing the bombing. In this expanded edition, Branfman follows the story forward in time, describing the hardships that Laotians faced after the war when they returned to find their farm fields littered with cluster munitions—explosives that continue to maim and kill today. Fred Branfman is a writer and activist on issues of peace and climate change who lives in Santa Barbara, California, and in Budapest. "A classic. . . . No American should be able to read [this book] without weeping at his country's arrogance." —Anthony Lewis, New York Times "Today, the significance of this book's message has, if anything, increased. As Fred Branfman predicted with uncommon prescience, the massive U.S. bombing of Laos during the Vietnam War marked the advent of a new kind of warfare—automated, aerial, and secret—that is just now emerging as the dominant means of projecting U.S. power worldwide."—Alfred W. McCoy, author of Torture and Impunity: The U.S. Doctrine of Coercive Interrogation 
Price: 18.95 USD
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2 PFAFF, TIM. Hmong In America: Journey From A Secret War.
Chippewa Valley Museum, Eau Clair: 2005. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Hmong in America tells the dramatic story of one of America's newest groups of immigrants, the Hmong, told through the voices of the people who lived this contemporary history. Their journey begins in the scenic, rugged highlands of Laos, travels through the Vietnam War, pauses in the over-crowded refugee camps of Thailand, and ends with the challenges of resettlement and a new life in America. Tim Pfaff, curator of public programs at the Chippewa Valley Museum in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, served as principal writer for the team that developed the Hmong in America project. 100 pages, 10 x 8, 31 color photos, 67 black and whites photos, 6 illustrations. 
Price: 18.95 USD
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3 SANDER, ROBERT D. Invasion Of Laos, 1971: Lam Son 719.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2014. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The political planning and military execution of one of the most costly losses of the Vietnam War. In 1971, while U.S. ground forces were prohibited from crossing the Laotian border, a South Vietnamese Army corps, with U.S. air support, launched the largest airmobile operation in the history of warfare, Lam Son 719. The objective: to sever the North Vietnamese Army's main logistical artery, the Ho Chi Minh Trail, at its hub, Tchepone in Laos, an operation that, according to General Creighton Abrams, could have been the decisive battle of the war, hastening the withdrawal of U.S. forces and ensuring the survival of South Vietnam. The outcome: defeat of the South Vietnamese Army and heavy losses of U.S. helicopters and aircrews, but a successful preemptive strike that met President Nixon's near-term political objectives. Author Robert Sander, a helicopter pilot in Lam Son 719, explores why an operation of such importance failed. Drawing on archives and interviews, and firsthand testimony and reports, Sander chronicles not only the planning and execution of the operation but also the maneuvers of the bastions of political and military power during the ten-year effort to end Communist infiltration of South Vietnam, leading up to Lam Son 719. The result is a picture from disparate perspectives: the Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon administrations; the South Vietnamese government led by President Nguyen Van Thieu; and senior U.S. military commanders and army aviators. Sander's conclusion is at once powerful and persuasively clear. Lam Son 719 was doomed in both the planning and execution—a casualty of domestic and international politics, flawed assumptions, incompetent execution, and the resolve of the North Vietnamese Army. A powerful work of military and political history, this book offers eloquent testimony that "failure, like success, cannot be measured in absolute terms." 14 black-and-white Illustrations., 6 maps, 304 pages, 6" x 9". 
Price: 19.90 USD
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4 SANDER, ROBERT D. Invasion Of Laos, 1971: Lam Son 719.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2014. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
The political planning and military execution of one of the most costly losses of the Vietnam War. In 1971, while U.S. ground forces were prohibited from crossing the Laotian border, a South Vietnamese Army corps, with U.S. air support, launched the largest airmobile operation in the history of warfare, Lam Son 719. The objective: to sever the North Vietnamese Army's main logistical artery, the Ho Chi Minh Trail, at its hub, Tchepone in Laos, an operation that, according to General Creighton Abrams, could have been the decisive battle of the war, hastening the withdrawal of U.S. forces and ensuring the survival of South Vietnam. The outcome: defeat of the South Vietnamese Army and heavy losses of U.S. helicopters and aircrews, but a successful preemptive strike that met President Nixon's near-term political objectives. Author Robert Sander, a helicopter pilot in Lam Son 719, explores why an operation of such importance failed. Drawing on archives and interviews, and firsthand testimony and reports, Sander chronicles not only the planning and execution of the operation but also the maneuvers of the bastions of political and military power during the ten-year effort to end Communist infiltration of South Vietnam, leading up to Lam Son 719. The result is a picture from disparate perspectives: the Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon administrations; the South Vietnamese government led by President Nguyen Van Thieu; and senior U.S. military commanders and army aviators. Sander's conclusion is at once powerful and persuasively clear. Lam Son 719 was doomed in both the planning and execution—a casualty of domestic and international politics, flawed assumptions, incompetent execution, and the resolve of the North Vietnamese Army. A powerful work of military and political history, this book offers eloquent testimony that "failure, like success, cannot be measured in absolute terms." 14 black-and-white Illustrations., 6 maps, 304 pages, 6" x 9". 
Price: 28.45 USD
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