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NATIVE AMERICANS.

NATIVE AMERICANS.

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1 A Nation In Transition: Douglas Henry Johnston And The Chickasaws, 1898-1939.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2009. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Chronicles the political life of an important Chickasaw leader Douglas Henry Johnston was governor of the Chickasaw Nation from 1898 to 1902 and from 1904 to 1939. His tenure in this position is the longest of any American Indian chief executive. In this much-anticipated biography, Michael Lovegrove chronicles Johnston's remarkable political life, telling the story of how he led his people—with diplomacy and efficiency—through the devastating dissolution of tribal lands at the beginning of the twentieth century and through the contentious struggles in the three decades that followed. Drawing on a range of sources, Lovegrove shows the enormous impact Governor Johnston had on the development of the Chickasaw Nation. A mild-mannered, intellectually gifted statesman, he stood steadfast at the helm of his people, helping them navigate federal allotment during the Dawes Commission era at the turn of the century. In his capacity as the federally appointed Chickasaw governor after Oklahoma statehood in 1907, Johnston led the Chickasaw and Choctaw Treaty Rights Association, which successfully fought the State of Oklahoma's efforts to tax allotment lands. The governor and his colleagues vigorously challenged these taxation initiatives in federal court, arguing that they violated the Dawes Act of 1887, the Atoka Agreement of 1897, and the Curtis Act of 1898. Fortunately, Johnston lived and led his people long enough to see new hope emerge in the Indian New Deal of the 1930s. A valuable addition to the history of the Chickasaw Nation, this richly textured historical narrative reveals the tribulations and accomplishments of a great statesman. Dr. Michael Lovegrove, historian and native Oklahoman, received his BA, MA, and PhD from the University of Oklahoma. He is a member of several historical societies, including a life member of the Oklahoma Historical Society and a charter member of the Chickasaw Historical Society. He is the past President of the Friends of the Oklahoma Historical Society Archives and has served on the Friends Board of Directors for ten years. He is a professor of history at Rose State College in Midwest City where he teaches United States History to 1877 and since 1877; History of the American West; and Oklahoma History. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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2 Death Dances: Two Novellas On North American Indians.
Apple-wood Press, Cambridge 1979. 0918222087 / 9780918222084 First Edition (Unstated). s Softcover. Reading copy. 

Price: 15.20 USD
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3 The Gift Of The Sacred Pipe.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 1995. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
This book is an illustrated edition of Black Elk's account of the seven sacred rites of the Oglala Sioux. Vividly portraying the arrival of the White Buffalo Woman on the Plains, the paintings and charcoals by Vera Louise Drysdale highlight dramatic elements of the ancient rituals she imparted, and they show everyday objects that were sanctified in the Sioux cosmology. The sacred pipe is the central instrument in the holy rites of the Sioux people. The White Buffalo Woman appeared on the Plains to give the pipe to the Sioux so that they might "send their voices" to Wakan-Tanka, the Great Spirit. She related the seven rites of the pipe: the keeping of the soul, the rite of purification, crying for a vision, the Sun Dance, the making of relatives, preparation for womanhood, and the throwing of the ball that symbolizes the earth and gives strength to future generations. In this volume the rituals are condensed, but the continuity of Joseph Epes Brown's text is preserved. The original text, as given by Black Elk, was recorded in 1947; in 1953 the University of Oklahoma Press published it as The Sacred Pipe. Joseph Epes Brown (1920-2000) was an American scholar whose lifelong dedication to Native American traditions helped bring the study of American Indian religious traditions into higher education. His book, The Sacred Pipe, is an account of his discussions with the Lakota holy man, Black Elk. "I traveled among many of the prairie Indians," Brown said, "and after meeting the old Sioux priest Black Elk, I was asked by him to record the account he should give me of his ancient religion. This volume I really consider to be his work and his contribution to the Sioux." Vera Louise Drysdale, a professional artist and illustrator with numerous Indian portraits to her credit, worked for five years on the illustrations for The Gift of the Sacred Pipe. "Merely contemplating these mystical paintings moves the reader to a deeper understanding than is possible through words alone. Nevertheless, the accompanying description of rituals is authentic, direct, and convincing."—Southwestern Lore. "Your paintings are a delight to the eyes and heart, and your profound respect for the holiness of the White Buffalo Calf Woman, and for the Sacred Pipe she brought, clearly shines forth from those paintings." -Father Peter J. Powell, author of Sweet Medicine and People of the Sacred Mountain. "Done in spherical form, perhaps implying the universal outlook of the Sioux, these illustrations add visual dimension to the rich wording of Black Elk's account. Now readers will be better able to see the meaning of these rituals." - Journal of the West. 
Price: 18.95 USD
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4 ABBOTT, RAYMOND H. That Day In Gordon.
The Vanguard Press, New York: 1986. 0814909248 / 9780814909249 First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Library discard. Good condition. 
Deeply felt novel about the destiny of Black Horse, a Native American living on a South Dakota reservation. 
Price: 9.36 USD
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5 ACKERMAN, LILLIAN A. & KLEIN, LAURA F. (EDITORS). Women And Power In Native North America.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2000. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Since the colonization of indigenous peoples in North America, the roles of Native women within their societies have been concealed or, at best, misunderstood. By examining gender status, and particularly power, in ten culture areas, this volume, edited by Laura F. Klein and Lillian A. Ackerman, seeks to draw away the curtain of silence surrounding the lives of Native North American women. Power is understood to be manifested in a multiplicity of ways: through cosmology, economic control, and formal hierarchy. In the Native societies examined, power is continually created and redefined through individual life stages and through the history of the society. The important issue is autonomy-whether, or to what extent, individuals are autonomous in living their lives. Each author demonstrates that women in a particular cultural area of aboriginal North America had (and have) more power than many previous observers have claimed. In this volume: "Introduction," Laura F. Klein and Lillian A. Ackerman; "Gender in Inuit Society," Lee Guemple; "Mother as Clanswoman: Rank and Gender in Tlingit Society," Laura F. Klein; ''Asymmetric Equals: Women and Men Among the Chipewyan," Henry S. Sharp; "Complementary but Equal: Gender Status in the Plateau," Lillian A. Ackerman; "First Among Equals? The Changing Status of Seneca Women," Joy Bilharz; "Blackfoot Persons," Alice B. Kehoe; "Evolving Gender Roles in Porno Society," Victoria D. Patterson; "The Dynamics of Southern Paiute Women's Roles," Martha C. Knack; "The Gender Status of Navajo Women," Mary Shepardson; "Continuity and Change in Gender Roles at San Juan Pueblo," Sue-Ellen Jacobs; "Women's Status Among the Muskogee and Cherokee," Richard A. Sattler; "Gender and Power in Native North America: Concluding Remarks," Daniel Maltz and JoAllyn Archambault. Lillian A. Ackerman is a research anthropologist and Adjunct Associate Professor of Anthropology at Washington State University. Both have published extensively in Native American anthropology, focusing on women's roles. Laura F. Klein is Professor of Anthropology, Pacific Lutheran University. 
Price: 18.95 USD
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6 ALI, SALEEM H. Mining The Environment And Indigenous Development Conflicts.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
From sun-baked Black Mesa to the icy coast of Labrador, native lands for decades have endured mining ventures that have only lately been subject to environmental lwa and treaty rights. This book gets to the heart of resource conflicts and environmental impact assessment by asking why indigenous communities support environmental causes in some cases of mining development but not in others. Saleem Ali examines environmental conflicts between mining companies and indigenous communities and with rare objectivity offers a comparative study of the factors leading to those conflicts. Mining, the Environment, and Indigenous Development Conflicts presents four cases from the United States and Canada: the Navajos and Hopis with Peabody Coal in Arizona; the Chippewas with the Crandon Mine proposal in Wisconsin; the Chipewyan Inuits, Dn and Cree with Cameco in Saskatchewan; and the Innu and Inuits with Inco in Labrador. These cases exemplify different historical relationships with government and industry and provide an instance of high and low levels of Native resistance in each country. Through these cases, Ali analyzes why and under what circumstances tribes agree to negotiated mining agreements on their lands, and why some negotiations are successful and others not. Ali challenges conventional theories of conflict based on economic or environmental cost-benefit analysis, which do not fully capture the dynamics of resistance. He proposes that the underlying issue has less to do with environmental concerns than with sovereignty, which often complicates relationships between tribes and environmental organizations. Activist groups, he observes, fail to understand such tribal concerns and often have problems working with tribes on issues where they may presume a common environmental interest. This book goes beyond popular perceptions of environmentalism to provide a detailed picture of how and when the concerns of industry, society, and tribal governments may converge and when they conflict. As demands for domestic energy exploration increase, it offers clear guidance for such endeavors when native lands are involved. 
Price: 31.30 USD
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7 ALLEN, PAULA GUNN. Grandmothers Of The Light: A Medicine Woman's Sourcebook.
Beacon Press, Boston: 1991. 0807081027 / 9780807081020 h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 

Price: 11.16 USD
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8 ANDERSON, GARY CLAYTON. The Indian Southwest, 1580-1830: Ethnogenesis And Reinvention.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2009. Volume 232 in the Civilization of the American Indian Series. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
How southwestern Indian peoples adapted to European conquest. The Indian Southwest, 1580-1830 demonstrates that, in the face of European conquest, severe drought, and disease, Indians in the Southwest proved remarkably adaptable and dynamic, remaining independent actors and even prospering. Some tribes temporarily joined Spanish missions or assimilated into other tribes. Others survived by remaining on the fringe of Spanish settlement, migrating, and expanding exchange relationships with other tribes. Still others incorporated remnant bands and individuals and strengthened their economic systems. The vibrancy of southwestern Indian societies today is due in part to the exchange-based political economies their ancestors created almost three centuries ago. Gary Clayton Anderson, Professor of History at the University of Oklahoma, is author of The Conquest of Texas: Ethnic Cleansing in the Promised Land, 1820-1875. The Indian Southwest, 1580-1830 won the publication award from the San Antonio Conservation Society. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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9 BAHR, DIANA MEYERS. Viola Martinez, California Paiute: Living In Two Worlds.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2010. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
The life story of Viola Martinez, an Owens Valley Paiute Indian of eastern California, extends over nine decades of the twentieth century. Viola experienced forced assimilation in an Indian boarding school, overcame racial stereotypes to pursue a college degree, and spent several years working at a Japanese American internment camp during World War II. Finding herself poised uncertainly between Indian and white worlds, Viola was determined to turn her marginalized existence into an opportunity for personal empowerment. In Viola Martinez, California Paiute, Diana Meyers Bahr recounts Viola's extraordinary life story and examines her strategies for dealing with acculturation. Bahr allows Viola to tell her story in her own words, beginning with her early years in Owens Valley, where she learned traditional lifeways, such as gathering piĖons, from her aunt. In the summers, she traveled by horse and buggy into the High Sierras where her aunt traded with Basque sheepherders. Viola was sent to the Sherman Institute, a federal boarding school with a mandate to assimilate American Indians into U.S. mainstream culture. Punished for speaking Paiute at the boarding school, Viola and her cousin climbed fifty-foot palm trees to speak their native language secretly. Realizing that, despite her efforts, she was losing her language, Viola resolved not just to learn English but to master it. She earned a degree from Santa Barbara State College and pursued a career as social worker. During World War II, Viola worked as an employment counselor for Japanese American internees at the Manzanar War Relocation Authority camp. Later in life, she became a teacher and worked tirelessly as a founding member of the Los Angeles American Indian Education Commission. 
Price: 18.95 USD
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10 BALL, EVE. In The Days Of Victorio: Recollections Of A Warm Springs Apache.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Chief Victorio of the Warm Springs Apache, has recounted the turbulent life of his people between 1876 and 1886. This eyewitness account . . . recalls not only the hunger, pursuit, and strife of those years, but also the thoughts, feelings, and culture of the hunted tribe. Recommended as general reading. —Library Journal 
Price: 18.95 USD
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11 BANKS, DENNIS WITH ERDOES, RICHARD. Ojibwa Warrior: Dennis Banks And The Rise Of The American Indian Movement.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2005. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Dennis Banks, an American Indian of the Ojibwa Tribe and a founder of the American Indian Movement, is one of the most influential Indian leaders of our time. In Ojibwa Warrior, written with acclaimed writer and photographer Richard Erdoes, Banks tells his own story for the first time and also traces the rise of the American Indian Movement (AIM). The authors present an insider's understanding of AIM protest events—the Trail of Broken Treaties march to Washington, D.C.; the resulting takeover of the BIA building; the riot at Custer, South Dakota; and the 1973 standoff at Wounded Knee. Enhancing the narrative are dramatic photographs, most taken by Richard Erdoes, depicting key people and events. "[Banks's] retelling of these events reads as seamlessly as a great campfire story (or a well-edited oral transcript). He takes readers deep inside the traditional Sun Dances and Sweat Houses of his Ojibwa Tribe and deep into the action of the Trail of Broken Treaties. . . . [T]his volume [is] an important addition to the history of Native American and civil rights movements in the United States."—Publishers Weekly Dennis Banks has been an activist, counselor, teacher, and consultant on American Indian rights. He now owns a natural foods company in Federal Dam, Minnesota, that follows the traditions of his youth. Richard Erdoes, Dennis's friend for more than thirty years, is an award-winning photographer, illustrator, and author of many books on American Indians. He resides in Santa Fe, New Mexico. 
Price: 18.95 USD
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12 BECK, PAUL N. Columns Of Vengeance: Soldiers, Sioux, And The Punitive Expeditions, 1863-1864.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: . h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
In the summer of 1862, Minnesotans found themselves fighting interconnected wars—the first against the rebellious Southern states, and the second an internal war against the Sioux. While the Civil War was more important to the future of the United States, the Dakota War of 1862 proved far more destructive to the people of Minnesota—both whites and American Indians. It led to U.S. military action against the Sioux, divided the Dakotas over whether to fight or not, and left hundreds of white settlers dead. In Columns of Vengeance, historian Paul N. Beck offers a reappraisal of the Punitive Expeditions of 1863 and 1864, the U.S. Army's response to the Dakota War of 1862. Whereas previous accounts have approached the Punitive Expeditions as a military campaign of the Indian Wars, Beck argues that the expeditions were also an extension of the Civil War. The strategy and tactics reflected those of the war in the East, and Civil War operations directly affected planning and logistics in the West. Beck also examines the devastating impact the expeditions had on the various bands and tribes of the Sioux. Whites viewed the expeditions as punishment—"columns of vengeance" sent against those Dakotas who had started the war in 1862—yet the majority of the Sioux the army encountered had little or nothing to do with the earlier uprising in Minnesota. Rather than relying only on the official records of the commanding officers involved, Beck presents a much fuller picture of the conflict by utilizing the letters, diaries, and personal accounts of the common soldiers who took part in the expeditions, as well as rare personal narratives from the Dakotas. Drawing on a wealth of firsthand accounts and linking the Punitive Expeditions of 1863 and 1864 to the overall Civil War experience, Columns of Vengeance offers fresh insight into an important chapter in the development of U.S. military operations against the Sioux. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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13 BECK, PAUL N. Inkpaduta: Dakota Leader.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2008. First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Reassesses a Sioux warrior long presumed a villain. Leader of the Santee Sioux, Inkpaduta (1815-79) participated in some of the most decisive battles of the northern Great Plains, including Custer's defeat at the Little Bighorn. But the attack in 1857 on forty white settlers known as the Spirit Lake Massacre gave Inkpaduta the reputation of being the most brutal of all the Sioux leaders. Paul N. Beck now challenges a century and a half of bias to reassess the life and legacy of this important Dakota leader. In the most complete biography of Inkpaduta ever written, Beck draws on Indian agents' correspondence, journals, and other sources to paint a broader picture of the whole person, showing him to have been not only a courageous warrior but also a dedicated family man and tribal leader who got along reasonably well with whites for most of his life. Beck sheds new light on many poorly understood aspects of Inkpaduta's life, including his journeys in the American West after the Spirit Lake Massacre. Beck reexamines Euro-American attitudes toward Indians and the stereotypes that shaped nineteenth-century writing, showing how they persisted in portrayals of Inkpaduta well into the twentieth century, even after more generous appreciations of American Indian cultures had become commonplace. Long considered a villain whose passion was murdering white settlers, Inkpaduta is here restored to more human dimensions. Inkpaduta: Dakota Leader shatters the myths that surrounded his life for too long and provides the most extensive reassessment of this leader's life to date. Paul N. Beck is Professor of History at Wisconsin Lutheran College, Milwaukee, and author of The First Sioux War: The Grattan Fight and Blue Water Creek, 1854-1856. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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14 BENALLY, MALCOLM D. Bitter Water: Din Oral Histories Of The Navajo-hopi Land Dispute.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2011. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Many know that the removal and relocation of Indigenous peoples from traditional lands is a part of the United States' colonial past, but few know that—in an expansive corner of northeastern Arizona—the saga continues. The 1974 Settlement Act officially divided a reservation established almost a century earlier between the Din (Navajo) and the Hopi, and legally granted the contested land to the Hopi. To date, the U.S. government has relocated between 12,000 and 14,000 Din from Hopi Partitioned Lands, and the Din—both there and elsewhere—continue to live with the legacy of this relocation. Bitter Water presents the narratives of four Din women who have resisted removal but who have watched as their communities and lifeways have changed dramatically. The book, based on 25 hours of filmed personal testimony, features the women's candid discussions of their efforts to carry on a traditional way of life in a contemporary world that includes relocation and partitioned lands; encroaching Western values and culture; and devastating mineral extraction and development in the Black Mesa region of Arizona. Though their accounts are framed by insightful writings by both Benally and Din historian Jennifer Nez Denetdale, Benally lets the stories of the four women elders speak for themselves. Scholars, media, and other outsiders have all told their versions of this story, but this is the first book that centers on the stories of women who have lived it—in their own words in Navajo as well as the English translation. The result is a living history of a contested cultural landscape and the unique worldview of women determined to maintain their traditions and lifeways, which are so intimately connected to the land. This book is more than a collection of stories, poetry, and prose. It is a chronicle of resistance as spoken from the hearts of those who have lived it. "This glimpse into a different culture and time challenges the reader to learn more about and better understand the Navajo perspective. The text, written in both Navajo and English, provides insight into the thinking of this beleaguered group." -Western Historical Quarterly "This book gives these very prominent women a chance to tell their story, and through these women's tales, it gives the Navajo people a voice as well." -Navajo-Hopi Observer 
Price: 18.95 USD
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15 BERTHRONG, DONALD J. The Southern Cheyennes.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
For almost fifty years George Bird Grinnell's great work The Fighting Cheyennes has stood unrevised and virtually unchallenged as the definitive account of the struggles of the Cheyenne Indians to preserve their way of life. Now Donald J. Berthrong has re-examined Grinnell's findings and searched historical records unavailable to or not used by Grinnell to verify or correct his conclusions. The result is this accurate, highly interesting account of the Cheyennes' life on the Great Plains, their system of government and religion, and their relation to the fur and hide trade during their last years of freedom. After nearly two centuries of fighting other Indians and whites for their lands, in the eighteenth century the Cheyenne's were forced to shift their range from the Minnesota River Valley to the Central and Southern Plains. From 1861 through 1875, they fought to maintain their free, nomadic existence. There were bloody wars with territorial forces and federal troops, and a few years of intermittent peace and retaliation (including the massacre at Sand Creek in 1864). Finally, after the intensive winter campaign of 1874-75, the fierce Southern Cheyenne's were brought to bay by the U.S. Army and herded onto a reservation in western Indian Territory (now Oklahoma). Their turbulent, colorful history related by Berthrong will interest the general reader as well as the historian and anthropologist. 
Price: 28.45 USD
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16 BIERHORST, JOHN (EDITOR). The Red Swan: Myths And Tales Of The American Indians.
Farrar, Straus & Giroux, New York: 1976. 0374513937 / 9780374513931 s Softcover. Good condition. 

Price: 9.03 USD
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17 BIGART, ROBERT J. Getting Good Crops: Economic And Diplomatic Survival Strategies Of The Montana Bitterroot Salish Indians 1870-1891.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2010. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
In 1870, the Bitterroot Salish Indians—called "Flatheads" by the first white explorers to encounter them—were a small tribe living on the western slope of the Northern Rocky Mountains in Montana Territory. Pressures on the Salish were intensifying during this time, from droughts and dwindling resources to aggressive neighboring tribes and Anglo-American expansion. In 1891, the economically impoverished Salish accepted government promises of assistance and retreated to the Flathead Reservation, more than sixty miles from their homeland. In Getting Good Crops, Robert J. Bigart examines the full range of available sources to explain how the Salish survived into the twentieth century, despite their small numbers, their military disadvantages, and the aggressive invasion of white settlers who greedily devoured their land and its natural resources. Bigart argues that a key to the survival of the Salish, from the early nineteenth century onward, was their diplomatic agility and willingness to form strategic alliances and friendships with non-Salish peoples. In doing so, the Salish navigated their way through multiple crises, relying more on their wits than on force. The Salish also took steps to sustain themselves economically. Although hunting and gathering had been their mainstay for centuries, the Salish began farming — "getting good crops" — to feed themselves because buffalo were becoming increasingly scarce. Raised on the Flathead Reservation himself, the author is seeking to convey the Salish story from their perspective, despite the paucity of written Salish testimony. What emerges is a picture — both inspiring and heartbreaking— of a people maintaining autonomy against all odds. 
Price: 37.95 USD
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18 BLACKMAN, JON S. Oklahoma's Indian New Deal.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: . s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Among the New Deal programs that transformed American life in the 1930s was legislation known as the Indian New Deal, whose centerpiece was the Indian Reorganization Act (IRA) of 1934. Oddly, much of that law did not apply to Native residents of Oklahoma, even though a large percentage of the country's Native American population resided there in the 1930s and no other state was home to so many different tribes. The Oklahoma Indian Welfare Act (OIWA), passed by Congress in 1936, brought Oklahoma Indians under all of the IRA's provisions, but included other measures that applied only to Oklahoma's tribal population. This first book-length history of the OIWA explains the law's origins, enactment, implementation, and impact, and shows how the act played a unique role in the Indian New Deal. In the early decades of the twentieth century, white farmers, entrepreneurs, and lawyers used allotment policies and other legal means to gain control of thousands of acres of Indian land in Oklahoma. To counter the accumulated effects of this history, the OIWA specified how tribes could strengthen government by adopting new constitutions, and it enabled both tribes and individual Indians to obtain financial credit and land. Virulent opposition to the bill came from oil, timber, mining, farming, and ranching interests. Jon S. Blackman's narrative of the legislative battle reveals the roles of bureaucrats, politicians, and tribal members in drafting and enacting the law. Although the OIWA encouraged tribes to organize for political and economic purposes, it yielded mixed results. It did not produce a significant increase in Indian land ownership in Oklahoma, and only a small percentage of Indian households applied for OIWA loans. Yet the act increased member participation in tribal affairs, enhanced Indian relations with non-Indian businesses and government, promoted greater Indian influence in government programs—and, as Blackman shows, became a springboard to the self-determination movements of the 1950s and 1960s. 
Price: 23.70 USD
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19 BLEEKER, SONIA; SASAKI, KISA N. (ILLUSTRATIONS). The Maya: Indians Of Central America,
William Morrow and Co., New York: November 1963. Third Printing. h Hardcover with dustjacket and protective mylar covering. Reading copy. Library discard. 
The Maya Indians who lived in southeastern Mexico, Guatemala, and Honduras over 3,000 years ago, created a complex civilization that still fascinates us today. Tells of the ancient splendors of the Mayas in a narrative that is vivid and perceptive. Includes an Index. 
Price: 9.50 USD
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20 BOPP, JUDIE & MICHAEL; BROWN, LEE & LANE, PHIL (PRODUCED COLLABORATIVELY BY). The Sacred Tree: Reflections On Native American Spirituality.
Lotus Light, Wilkmot: 1985. 0941524582 / 9780941524582 Second Edition. s Softcover. Good condition. 
Created by the Four Winds Development Project, a Native American inter-tribal group, as a handbook of Native Spirituality for indigenous peoples all over the Americas and the World. Through the guidance of the tribal elders, Native values and traditions are being taught as the primary key to unlockiing the force that will move Native peoples on the path of their own development. The elders have prophesied that by returning to traditional values, native societies can be transformed. This transformation would then have a healing effect on our entir planet. This handbook is being used by the Four Worlds Development Project to eliminate widespread drug and alcohol abuse in tribal communities. 
Price: 13.30 USD
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