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BLACK STUDIES.

BLACK STUDIES.

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1 BALDWIN, JAMES. The Fire Next Time.
Dell, New York: August 1964. First Dell printing. s Softcover. Reading copy. Contains some underlining. 
"Explains what it means to be a Negro in America . . . If there ever was a compassionate and eloquent sermon for our time, demanding the most agonizing self-examination from anyone who reads, this is it . . . great . . . extraordinary." - Harper's. 
Price: 14.31 USD
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2 BARR, ALWYN. Black Texans: A History Of African Americans In Texas, 1528-1995.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2002. Second Edition. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
African Americans have lived in Texas for more than four hundred years—longer than in any other region of the United States. Beginning with the arrival of the first African American in 1528, Alwyn Barr, in Black Texans, examines the African American experience in Texas during the periods of exploration and colonization, slavery, Reconstruction, the struggle to retain the freedoms gained, the twentieth-century urban experience, and the modern civil rights movement. Barr discusses each period of African-American history in terms of politics, violence, and legal status; labor and economic status; education; and social life. Black Texans includes the history of the buffalo soldiers and the cowboys on Texas cattle drives, along with the achievements of notable African-American individuals in Texas history, from the Estevan the explorer through legislator Norris Wright Cuney and boxer Jack Johnson to state senator Barbara Jordan. Barr carries the story up to the present day in this second edition, which includes a new preface a new chapter on the years 1970-95, and a revised index. Alwyn Barr is Professor of History at Texas Tech University and the author of Reconstruction to Reform: Texas Politic, 1876-1906 and Texas in Revolt: The Battle for San Antonio, 1835. "Written in an enthusiastic and scholarly style, this book about black people in Texas is an excellent survey....Black Texans is a very fine contribution to the field."—Journal of American History. "A brilliant study by a leading authority, Black Texans will long remain an outstanding contribution to Texas, Black, and Southern history."—Chronicles of Oklahoma. 
Price: 24.18 USD
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3 BELL, DERRICK. And We Are Not Saved: The Elusive Quest For Racial Justice.
Basic Books, New York: 1989. 046500329X / 9780465003297 s Softcover. Reading copy. 
Harvard's first black tenured law professor combines fiction with fact to dramatize continuing racial injustices in the United States. Includes an Index. 
Price: 15.20 USD
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4 BEY, MARQUIS. Them Goon Rules: Fugitive Essays On Radical Black Feminism.
University of Iowa Press, Iowa City: 2019. The Feminist Wire Books Series Edition. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Marquis Bey's debut collection, Them Goon Rules, is an un-rulebook, a long-form essayistic sermon that meditates on how Blackness and nonnormative gender impact and remix everything we claim to know. A series of essays that reads like a critical memoir, this work queries the function and implications of politicized Blackness, Black feminism, and queerness. Bey binds together his personal experiences with social justice work at the New York-based Audre Lorde Project, growing up in Philly, and rigorous explorations of the iconoclasm of theorists of Black studies and Black feminism. Bey's voice recalibrates itself playfully on a dime, creating a collection that tarries in both academic and nonacademic realms. Fashioning fugitive Blackness and feminism around a line from Lil' Wayne's "A Millie," Them Goon Rules is a work of "auto-theory" that insists on radical modes of thought and being as a refrain and a hook that is unapologetic, rigorously thoughtful, and uncompromising. "Them Goon Rules is a provocative and compelling interdisciplinary trans-∆feminist read of American society and culture from a Black perspective." —Regina N. Bradley, English and African Diaspora Studies, Kennesaw State University "Marquis Bey has gifted us with more than a collection of essays about Blackness, feminism, and queerness—it is a tome for and with the 'ontologically criminalized.' Bey demonstrates a distinctive radical vulnerability that can only be the result of working in and through a Black queer feminist lens. Unapologetically, this text dances, bends, moves, breaks open and through language—an elaborated nah! There is powerful poetry here asking that we, scholars who believe in freedom, interrogate our own methods and motives again and again. This book is courageous as it dwells, a break in the break. A must-read for any scholar, poet, or (non)human seeking the spectacular possibility of taking flight." —Kai M. Green, Assistant Professor of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Williams College "Bey challenges those of us who are committed to Black justice to approach every day with the force of revolution. By refiguring Black freedom-making in this way, we are able not only to 'steal life back' from a white fickle normativity but also to enwrap that life in the promise of escape."—Hashim Pipkin, The Opportunity Network "Them Goon Rules is an exciting collection of essays—brimming with insight, inspiration, love, and rage, the book leads readers through an urgent set of questions about the body, identity, race, place, sex, Blackness, subversion, and gender. Offering what Bey at one point calls a 'fugitive praxis,' this book believes in transformation and shows us how it is done! Brilliant!"—Jack Halberstam, author of Trans*: A Quick and Quirky Guide to Gender Variance 
Price: 18.95 USD
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5 BONTEMPS, ARNA & CONROY, JACK. They Seek A City.
Doubleday, Doran and Co., Garden City: 1945. First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket.Reading copy but dustjacket is only in fair condition and part of it is missing. 
The real story of Black migration within the United States is told here for the first time. Fresh, colorful, dotted with unusual personalities, it highlights important chapters in their pursuit of tolerance and better economic opportunities. Includes an Index. 
Price: 93.81 USD
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6 CLEAVER, ELDRIDGE; SCHEER, ROBERT (EDITOR & INTRODUCTION). Eldridge Cleaver: Post-prison Writings And Speeches.
A Ramparts Book, New York: September 1969. First Vintage Books Edition. s Softcover. Very good reading copy. 
"After reading this urgently important book, no one should fail to realize how accurately Cleaver pinpoints the American malaise and its relationship to current world affairs - or just how remarkable a man he is, or how valuable." - Lindsay Patterson, The New York Times Book Review. 
Price: 17.77 USD
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7 DOBAK, WILLIAM A. & THOMAS D. PHILLIPS. The Black Regulars, 1866-1898.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2017. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
Black soldiers first entered the regular army of the United States in the summer of 1866. While their segregated regiments served in the American West for the next three decades, the promise of the Reconstruction era gave way to the repressiveness of Jim Crow. But black men found a degree of equality in the service: the army treated them no worse than it did their white counterparts. The Black Regulars uses army correspondence, court martial transcripts, and pension applications to tell who these men were often in their own words: how they were recruited and how their officers were selected; how the black regiments survived hostile Congressional hearings and stringent budget cuts; how enlisted men spent their time, both on and off duty; and how regimental chaplains tried to promote literacy through the army's schools. The authors shed new light on the military justice system, relations between black troops and their mostly white civilian neighbors, their professional reputations, and what veterans faced when they left the army for civilian life. 19 black-and-white Illustrations, 2 maps, 384 pages, 6" x 9". William A. Dobak received a Ph.D. in American Studies from the University of Kansas in 1995. He now works at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. Thomas D. Phillips holds a Ph.D. in history from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. "Based on exhaustive research in documents never before exploited, The Black Regulars offers fresh perspectives on black soldiers and overturns many long-held assumptions. A seminal work."--Robert M. Utley,, author of Cavalier in Buckskin "The army offered black men better opportunities than did civilian life, and William Dobak's The Black Regulars offers us the best study of their experiences."--James M. McPherson "Well written and full of fascinating detail, this balanced account should clear up many misconceptions."--Roger Lane, author of The Roots of Black Violence in Philadelphia, 1860-1900 
Price: 20.85 USD
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8 DOLINAR, BRIAN. The Black Cultural Front; Black Writers And Artists Of The Depression Generation.
University Press of Mississippi, Jackson. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
How the aftermath of the Great Depression convinced several African American writers to adopt a leftist outlook The Black Cultural Front describes how the social and political movements that grew out of the Depression facilitated the left turn of several African American artists and writers. The Communist-led John Reed Clubs brought together black and white writers in writing collectives. The Congress of Industrial Organizations' effort to recruit black workers inspired growing interest in the labor movement. One of the most concerted efforts was made by the National Negro Congress, a coalition of civil rights and labor organizations, which held cultural panels at its national conferences, fought segregation in the arts, promoted cultural education, and involved writers and artists in staging mass rallies during World War II. This book examines the formation of a black cultural front by looking at the works of poet Langston Hughes, novelist Chester Himes, and cartoonist Ollie Harrington. While none of these writers were card-carrying members of the Communist Party, they all participated in the Left during their careers. Interestingly, they all turned to creating popular culture in order to reach the black masses who were captivated by movies, radio, newspapers, and detective novels. There are chapters on Hughes's "Simple" stories, Himes's detective fiction, and Harrington's "Bootsie" cartoons. Collectively, the experience of these three figures contributes to the story of a "long" movement for African American freedom that flourished during the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s. Yet this book also stresses the impact that McCarthyism had on dismantling the Black Left and how it affected each individual involved. Each was radicalized at a different moment and for different reasons. Each suffered for their past allegiances, whether fleeing to the haven of the "Black Bank" in Paris, or staying home and facing the House Un-American Activities Committee. Yet the lasting influence of the Depression in their work was evident for the rest of their lives. Brian Dolinar teaches in the Department of African American Studies at the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana. His articles have appeared in Langston Hughes Review, Southern Quarterly, and Studies in American Humor. 288 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, bibliography, index 
Price: 28.50 USD
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9 DOLINAR, BRIAN. The Black Cultural Front; Black Writers And Artists Of The Depression Generation.
University Press of Mississippi, Jackson. h Hardcover with Printed Case Binding. Brand new book. 
How the aftermath of the Great Depression convinced several African American writers to adopt a leftist outlook The Black Cultural Front describes how the social and political movements that grew out of the Depression facilitated the left turn of several African American artists and writers. The Communist-led John Reed Clubs brought together black and white writers in writing collectives. The Congress of Industrial Organizations' effort to recruit black workers inspired growing interest in the labor movement. One of the most concerted efforts was made by the National Negro Congress, a coalition of civil rights and labor organizations, which held cultural panels at its national conferences, fought segregation in the arts, promoted cultural education, and involved writers and artists in staging mass rallies during World War II. This book examines the formation of a black cultural front by looking at the works of poet Langston Hughes, novelist Chester Himes, and cartoonist Ollie Harrington. While none of these writers were card-carrying members of the Communist Party, they all participated in the Left during their careers. Interestingly, they all turned to creating popular culture in order to reach the black masses who were captivated by movies, radio, newspapers, and detective novels. There are chapters on Hughes's "Simple" stories, Himes's detective fiction, and Harrington's "Bootsie" cartoons. Collectively, the experience of these three figures contributes to the story of a "long" movement for African American freedom that flourished during the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s. Yet this book also stresses the impact that McCarthyism had on dismantling the Black Left and how it affected each individual involved. Each was radicalized at a different moment and for different reasons. Each suffered for their past allegiances, whether fleeing to the haven of the "Black Bank" in Paris, or staying home and facing the House Un-American Activities Committee. Yet the lasting influence of the Depression in their work was evident for the rest of their lives. Brian Dolinar teaches in the Department of African American Studies at the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana. His articles have appeared in Langston Hughes Review, Southern Quarterly, and Studies in American Humor. 288 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, bibliography, index. 
Price: 57.00 USD
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10 FURNAS, J. C . Goodbye To Uncle Tom.
William Sloane Associates Inc., New York: 1956. Book Club Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition. 
An analysis of the myths pertaining to the American Negro, from their origins to the misconceptions of today. Includes an Index. 
Price: 7.32 USD
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11 GRIFFIN, JOHN HOWARD. Black Like Me: Updated With A New Epilogue By The Author.
Penguin Group, New York: 1976. 0451163176 / 9780451163172 Reprint Edition. s Softcover. Reading copy. 
What was it like to be a black in the Deep South? Novelist John Howard Griffith darkened his skin and set out to discover by personal experience the night side of American life. This is his startling report. "One of the deepest, most penetrating documents yet set down on the racial question." -- The Atlanta Journal-Constitution 
Price: 5.65 USD
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12 GRIFFIN, JOHN HOWARD; WITH AN EPILOGUE BY THE AUTHOR & AN AFTERWORD BY ROBERT BONAZZI. Black Like Me.
New American Library, New York: 2010. Fiftieth Anniversary Edition. s Softcover. Good condition but there is some underlining. 
What was it like to be a black in the Deep South? Novelist John Howard Griffith darkened his skin and set out to discover by personal experience the night side of American life. This is his startling report. "One of the deepest, most penetrating documents yet set down on the racial question." -- The Atlanta Journal-Constitution 
Price: 7.55 USD
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13 GRIFFIN, JOHN HOWARD; WITH AN EPILOGUE BY THE AUTHOR & AN AFTERWORD BY ROBERT BONAZZI. Black Like Me.
New American Library, New York: 1996. 0451192036 / 9780451192035 Twenty-fourth Printing. s Softcover. Good condition but there is some highlighting. 
What was it like to be a black in the Deep South? Novelist John Howard Griffith darkened his skin and set out to discover by personal experience the night side of American life. This is his startling report. "One of the deepest, most penetrating documents yet set down on the racial question." -- The Atlanta Journal-Constitution 
Price: 3.47 USD
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14 HAGER, CHRISTOPHER. Word By Word: Emancipation And The Act Of Writing.
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts and London England: 2015. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
One of the cruelest abuses of slavery in America was that slaves were forbidden to read and write. Consigned to illiteracy, they left no records of their thoughts and feelings apart from the few exceptional narratives of Frederick Douglass and others who escaped to the North—or so we have long believed. But as Christopher Hager reveals, a few enslaved African Americans managed to become literate in spite of all prohibitions, and during the halting years of emancipation thousands more seized the chance to learn. The letters and diaries of these novice writers, unpolished and hesitant yet rich with voice, show ordinary black men and women across the South using pen and paper to make sense of their experiences. Through an unprecedented gathering of these forgotten writings—from letters by individuals sold away from their families, to petitions from freedmen in the army to their new leaders, to a New Orleans man's transcription of the Constitution—Word by Word rewrites the history of emancipation. The idiosyncrasies of these untutored authors, Hager argues, reveal the enormous difficulty of straddling the border between slave and free. These unusual texts, composed by people with a unique perspective on the written word, force us to rethink the relationship between literacy and freedom. For African Americans at the end of slavery, learning to write could be liberating and empowering, but putting their hard-won skill to use often proved arduous and daunting—a portent of the tenuousness of the freedom to come. 328 pages, 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches, 11 halftones. Christopher Hager is Associate Professor of English and American Studies at Trinity College, Hartford. "Through a series of bold, imaginative and insightful case studies, Christopher Hager uncovers the intellectual world of U.S. slavery and charts the hopes, expectations and fears of enslaved writers… By understanding emancipation as a slow process rather than a rapid transformation, Word by Word shows how literacy was an incomplete and sometimes flawed instrument of black self-determination. The idea of emancipation as an unfinished revolution is not new, nor is the attention to subterranean networks of enslaved information and exchange particularly novel in slavery studies. By rendering legible and audible the writings of the literate minority, however, Hager reveals the desperate and creative measures taken by former slaves to assert their communal and individual voices. Most of course continued unlettered, but the striking improvement in black literacy during the two decades after emancipation (from 10 to 30 per cent) is testimony to the enduring importance attached to the written word and the empowering potential of African-American writing."—Richard Follett, Times Higher Education "Christopher Hager does a fascinating job of sifting through these letters [written by slaves], fleshing out as much as possible the stories of their authors, and casting it all as black America's first attempts at forging a voice in this strange land, in Word by Word: Emancipation and the Act of Writing."—Mark Reynolds, PopMatters "While Frederick Douglass invigorated abolitionists with his eloquent prose, many of his contemporaries, still enslaved or recently freed, scrawled barely legible letters to friends and family sold to distant masters. In this revelatory hybrid of history and textual analysis, Hager argues that the act of writing—often in defiance of states' antiliteracy laws—was an exceedingly potent form of self-empowerment for these oppressed men and women, never mind their poor spelling and unorthodox methods (one potter carved poetry into his work, another 'composed at the handle of the plough' and kept the lines memorized till he learned to write). Primary documents, intensely scrutinized, reveal powerful emotions and common hardships, bear witness to racial struggles across the country, and provide unalloyed insight into the stark yet hopeful reality after the Emancipation Proclamation. Particularly fascinating is the evolution of writing as a form of power: a former slave protests, via letter, to a Union general about Union soldiers attacking his neighbor's wife, while another journals his integration into the U.S. Navy with perfunctory but increasingly assured entries. This thoughtful examination of the artifacts of a too-long-silenced population is made all the more eloquent by accompanying facsimiles of the arduously penned missives."—Publishers Weekly "Hager provides an informed and informative view of writings produced by formerly enslaved African Americans, often overlooked as an illiterate group. Hager reminds readers to attend to those texts that have the power to give scholars a broader perspective of particular moments… By paying attention to these authors, Hager aims to develop new models for the interpretation of historical sources and give voice to both the unknown and the underappreciated."—T.T. Green, Choice "[An] always engaging account of how the path to freedom was paved, in part, with written words."—Kirkus Reviews "Hager seeks to craft an intellectual history of a people too often dismissed as illiterate and lacking a culture of letters. His focus is not on stars who are well known from fugitive slave narratives, but on a handful of more or less literate blacks whose previously unpublished letters provide pieces of a complex and rich narrative of liberation. Hager discusses the mental process of writing, exploring the inner lives, secrecy, and subversion shown in black initiatives to learn how to write and how to use writing to end enslavement and to embrace emancipation." —Thomas J. Davis, Library Journal "From its first pages, where a stumbling black writer in Civil War New Orleans picks up the U.S. Constitution, Word by Word focuses on the initial tremors of freedom for ordinary people amid wartime turmoil and the process of emancipation. This is original work of the highest order."—Kathleen Diffley, editor of To Live and Die: Collected Stories of the Civil War, 1861-1876 "Hager brilliantly imagines scenes of writing among freed people in the decades immediately following emancipation, showing how former slaves turned to writing as a way of taking control of their world. Word by Word is a major and revelatory act of historical recovery done with imaginative sympathy and critical verve."—Robert S. Levine, author of Dislocating Race and Nation: Episodes in Nineteenth-Century American Literary Nationalism "A penetrating and revealing portrait of people in the process of defining freedom, Word by Word is a stirring, important work that reshapes our understanding of slavery and emancipation."—Louis P. Masur, author of Lincoln's Hundred Days: The Emancipation Proclamation and the War for the Union 
Price: 18.95 USD
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15 HALL, STUART; EDITED BY KOBENA MERCER; FOREWORD BY HENRY LOUIS GATES, JR. The Fateful Triangle: Race, Ethnicity, Nation.
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts and London England: 2017. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
In The Fateful Triangle—drawn from lectures delivered at Harvard University in 1994—one of the founding figures of cultural studies reflects on the divisive, often deadly consequences of our contemporary politics of identification. As he untangles the power relations that permeate categories of race, ethnicity, and nationhood, Stuart Hall shows how old hierarchies of human identity in Western culture were forcefully broken apart when oppressed groups introduced new meanings to the representation of difference. From the Renaissance to the Enlightenment, the concept of race stressed distinctions of color as fixed and unchangeable. But for Hall, twentieth-century redefinitions of blackness reveal how identities and attitudes can be transformed through the medium of language itself. Like the "badge of color" W. E. B. Du Bois evoked in the anticolonial era, "black" became a sign of solidarity for Caribbean and South Asian migrants who fought discrimination in 1980s Britain. Hall sees such manifestations of "new ethnicities" as grounds for optimism in the face of worldwide fundamentalisms that respond with fear to social change. Migration was at the heart of Hall's diagnosis of the global predicaments taking shape around him. Explaining more than two decades ago why migrants are the target of new nationalisms, Hall's prescient vision helps us to understand today's crisis of liberal democracy. As he challenges us to find sustainable ways of living with difference, Hall gives us the concept of diaspora as a metaphor with which to enact fresh possibilities for redefining nation, race, and identity in the twenty-first century. Stuart Hall (1932-2014) was Professor of Sociology at the Open University, the founding editor of New Left Review, and Director of the Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies at the University of Birmingham. Kobena Mercer is Professor of History of Art and African American Studies at Yale University. Henry Louis Gates, Jr., is Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and the Director of the W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute at the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard University. "Promises to be essential reading for those seeking to understand Hall's tremendous impact on scholars, artists, and filmmakers on both sides of the Atlantic."—Glenn Ligon, Artforum "Hall's main argument rests on the notion that the greatest problem of the 21st century is living with and understanding differences…The Fateful Triangle makes me recall the need to constantly question, interrogate and dismantle how we understand hierarchies of difference and identity; and how the position of outsiders is always part of a larger political question. "—Kalwant Bhopal, Times Higher Education "In this long awaited work, Stuart Hall, the invisibly Jamaican co-founder of British cultural studies, powerfully interrogates what is, simultaneously, the central dilemma of transatlantic black cultures and one of the most acute paradoxes of modern times. He bracingly confronts the persistence of race—and its confounding liberal surrogates, ethnicity and nation—as a marker of identification, a fervently embraced 'sliding signifier' among blacks and other formerly subaltern peoples, in spite of its scientific invalidation and horrendous past. This is a profoundly humane work that not only integrates African-American and Anglo-Caribbean cultural studies, but finds room for hope and change in the discursive nature of their subject."—Orlando Patterson "These lectures are a vital contribution to Stuart Hall's enduring vocation to find a critical voice which is, in equal measure, just and generous, reflective and transformative. Marked by struggle and sobriety, this important work makes a significant contribution to a vision of community and an ethics of solidarity."—Homi K. Bhabha "Given the current political conditions, these lectures on race, ethnicity, and nation, delivered by Stuart Hall almost a quarter of a century ago, may be even more timely today. He has left us a vital legacy of intellectual passion, analytical rigor, and political prescience that should be heeded, especially now, by progressive scholars and activists."—Angela Y. Davis, University of California, Santa Cruz 
Price: 24.65 USD
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16 HATHAWAY, HEATHER. Caribbean Waves: Relocating Claude Mckay And Paule Marshall.
Indiana University Press, Bloomington: 1999. 0253335698 / 9780253335692 First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Very good condition. 
Explores the ways in which literature can probe the complexities of displacement and identity construction that often accompany migratory experiences. Analysis of McKay's and Marshall's works reveals how the forces of migration, racial and national affiliation, and "Americanization" can merge to produce uniquely hybridized, and at times profoundly homeless, black American immigrant identities. Includes an Index. 
Price: 37.38 USD
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17 HINGER, CHARLOTTE. Nicodemus: Post-reconstruction Politics And Racial Justice In Western Kansas.
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman: 2016. Volume 11 in Race and Culture in the American West. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Pushed out of the South as Reconstruction ended and as white landowners, employers, and "Redeemer" governments sought to reestablish the constraints of slavery, thousands of African Americans migrated west in search of better opportunities. As the first well-known all-black community on the plains, Nicodemus, Kansas, became a national exemplar of black self-improvement. But Nicodemus also embodied many of the problems facing African Americans during this time. Diverging philosophies within the community, Charlotte Hinger argues, foretold the differences that continue to divide black politicians and intellectuals today. At the time Nicodemus was founded, politicians underestimated the power of African American voters. But three of the town's black homesteaders—Abram Thompson Hall, Jr., Edward Preston McCabe, and John W. Niles—exerted extraordinary influence over county, state, and national politics. Hinger examines their divergent strategies for leading their community and for relating to white people, which reflected emerging black worldviews across the United States as African Americans grappled with the responsibilities accompanying their new freedom. Hall supported racial uplift, McCabe insisted on achieving equality through politics and legislation, and Niles advocated reparations for slavery. Hall and McCabe, both northerners, had distinguished educations, while Niles, a former slave, was a gifted orator. Their differing approaches to creating a new civilization on the prairie, seeking justice for blacks, and improving the situation of Nicodemus citizens roiled Kansas politics, already in turmoil over temperance and woman's suffrage. Nicodemus was a microcosm of all the issues facing black Americans in the late nineteenth century, and Hall, McCabe, and Niles are archetypes for powerful philosophies that have persisted into the twenty-first century. This study of their ideas and the ways they shaped Nicodemus offers a novel perspective on the most famous post-Civil War African American community in the West. 20 black-and-white Illustrations, 232 pages, 6" x 9". Award-winning novelist and independent historian Charlotte Hinger is the author of several articles and encyclopedia entries on African American history in the West and the novels Come Spring, Deadly Descent, Lethal Lineage, and Hidden Heritage. "Rich in detail and carefully researched, Charlotte Hinger's fine study illuminates the growth, development, and maturation of Nicodemus, Kansas, the most successful black town established during the 'Kansas Exodus.' Nicodemus also reveals the paradoxical race relations that African Americans experienced, the voices of ordinary people, the role that American Indians played in assisting the earliest black settlers, and their quest for full equality and civil rights. Historians of western and African American history will welcome and embrace this book."—Albert S. Broussard, author of Expectations of Equality: A History of Black Westerners "In this unprecedented full-length scholarly study of Nicodemus, Charlotte Hinger shows that the experiences of obtaining land, recruiting residents, building communities, protecting economic and political interests, grappling with the moral headache of helping refugees—all on the harsh, lonely prairies of western Kansas—drew African Americans into the same divergent patterns of racial uplift, social justice, and radicalism with which they would contend in the century and a half that followed."—James N. Leiker, author of Racial Borders: Black Soldiers along the Rio Grande 
Price: 28.45 USD
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18 HOBBS, ALLYSON. A Chosen Exile: A History Of Racial Passing In American Life.
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts and London England: 2016. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
On NPR's All Things Considered, listen to Allyson Hobbs discuss the difficulty of losing family and community in order to gain socioeconomic opportunities: Between the eighteenth and mid-twentieth centuries, countless African Americans passed as white, leaving behind families and friends, roots and community. It was, as Allyson Hobbs writes, a chosen exile, a separation from one racial identity and the leap into another. This revelatory history of passing explores the possibilities and challenges that racial indeterminacy presented to men and women living in a country obsessed with racial distinctions. It also tells a tale of loss. As racial relations in America have evolved so has the significance of passing. To pass as white in the antebellum South was to escape the shackles of slavery. After emancipation, many African Americans came to regard passing as a form of betrayal, a selling of one's birthright. When the initially hopeful period of Reconstruction proved short-lived, passing became an opportunity to defy Jim Crow and strike out on one's own. Although black Americans who adopted white identities reaped benefits of expanded opportunity and mobility, Hobbs helps us to recognize and understand the grief, loneliness, and isolation that accompanied—and often outweighed—these rewards. By the dawning of the civil rights era, more and more racially mixed Americans felt the loss of kin and community was too much to bear, that it was time to "pass out" and embrace a black identity. Although recent decades have witnessed an increasingly multiracial society and a growing acceptance of hybridity, the problem of race and identity remains at the center of public debate and emotionally fraught personal decisions. 400 pages, 5-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches, 26 halftones. Allyson Hobbs is Assistant Professor of History at Stanford University. "[An] incisive cultural history… [Hobbs] takes nothing at face value—least of all the idea that the person who is passing is actually and truly of one race or the other… [A] critically vigilant work."—Danzy Senna, The New York Times Book Review "A book that is at once literary, cultural, archival and social, crossing the borders of various approaches to the study of history in order to create a collage of a fascinating yet elusive phenomenon. Intrigued by the story of a distant relative who crosses the color line, Hobbs has followed this interest to explore the practice of passing with detail and rigor. Her writing is elegant, bubbling with curiosity even as it is authoritative and revelatory." —Imani Perry, The San Francisco Chronicle "The book is an admirable effort to catalogue the myriad classifications of race in America, to develop a taxonomy of biases that endure even as the country's complexion changes."—Joshua Cohen, Harper's "Hobbs provides fresh analysis of an oft-ignored phenomenon, and the result is as fascinating as it is innovative. She foregrounds the sense of loss that passing inflicted, and argues that many of those who were left behind were just as wounded and traumatized as those who departed. Those who passed may have had much to gain, but what were the hidden costs, the invisible scars of enforced patterns of subversion and suppression? She suggests that the core issue of passing is not what an individual becomes, but rather 'losing what you pass away from.' By turning safe assumptions inside out, Hobbs questions some of the longest-held ideas about racial identification within American society."—Catherine Clinton, Times Higher Education "Passing, as Allyson Hobbs describes in this brilliant, fascinating new study, is itself as fluid, complex, and contradictory as our ideas of race."—Kate Tuttle, The Boston Globe "By investigating the binary lives of the so-called ghosts that exist in American history, Hobbs raises important questions and ideas about race relations and the 'lost' histories of African American communities. "—Cicely Douglas, Library Journal "In narrating the lives of Americans at the border of whiteness, Hobbs illuminates our understanding of our country's tortured race history and of the injustices that drove people to make the ultimate migration—out of the tyranny of enslavement and the terrors of Jim Crow to the costly privilege of the larger white world. Their anguish, alienation, and constant fear of discovery are brilliantly and painfully rendered in this important book, and, through them, we see the arbitrariness of race and the origins of racial divisions that we live with to this day."—Isabel Wilkerson, author of The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration "With remarkable research and deep feeling for her subjects, Hobbs uncovers the stories of countless Americans of African descent who severed their family ties to pass into a world where they would be accorded the privileges of whites. At turns sad, inspiring, and provocative, the book raises important questions about the enduring power of race in American life."—Martha A. Sandweiss, author of Passing Strange: A Gilded Age Tale of Love and Deception Across the Color Line 
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19 HOBBS, ALLYSON. A Chosen Exile: A History Of Racial Passing In American Life.
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts and London England: 2014. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
On NPR's All Things Considered, listen to Allyson Hobbs discuss the difficulty of losing family and community in order to gain socioeconomic opportunities: Between the eighteenth and mid-twentieth centuries, countless African Americans passed as white, leaving behind families and friends, roots and community. It was, as Allyson Hobbs writes, a chosen exile, a separation from one racial identity and the leap into another. This revelatory history of passing explores the possibilities and challenges that racial indeterminacy presented to men and women living in a country obsessed with racial distinctions. It also tells a tale of loss. As racial relations in America have evolved so has the significance of passing. To pass as white in the antebellum South was to escape the shackles of slavery. After emancipation, many African Americans came to regard passing as a form of betrayal, a selling of one's birthright. When the initially hopeful period of Reconstruction proved short-lived, passing became an opportunity to defy Jim Crow and strike out on one's own. Although black Americans who adopted white identities reaped benefits of expanded opportunity and mobility, Hobbs helps us to recognize and understand the grief, loneliness, and isolation that accompanied—and often outweighed—these rewards. By the dawning of the civil rights era, more and more racially mixed Americans felt the loss of kin and community was too much to bear, that it was time to "pass out" and embrace a black identity. Although recent decades have witnessed an increasingly multiracial society and a growing acceptance of hybridity, the problem of race and identity remains at the center of public debate and emotionally fraught personal decisions. 400 pages, 5-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches, 26 halftones. Allyson Hobbs is Assistant Professor of History at Stanford University. "[An] incisive cultural history… [Hobbs] takes nothing at face value—least of all the idea that the person who is passing is actually and truly of one race or the other… [A] critically vigilant work."—Danzy Senna, The New York Times Book Review "A book that is at once literary, cultural, archival and social, crossing the borders of various approaches to the study of history in order to create a collage of a fascinating yet elusive phenomenon. Intrigued by the story of a distant relative who crosses the color line, Hobbs has followed this interest to explore the practice of passing with detail and rigor. Her writing is elegant, bubbling with curiosity even as it is authoritative and revelatory." —Imani Perry, The San Francisco Chronicle "The book is an admirable effort to catalogue the myriad classifications of race in America, to develop a taxonomy of biases that endure even as the country's complexion changes."—Joshua Cohen, Harper's "Hobbs provides fresh analysis of an oft-ignored phenomenon, and the result is as fascinating as it is innovative. She foregrounds the sense of loss that passing inflicted, and argues that many of those who were left behind were just as wounded and traumatized as those who departed. Those who passed may have had much to gain, but what were the hidden costs, the invisible scars of enforced patterns of subversion and suppression? She suggests that the core issue of passing is not what an individual becomes, but rather 'losing what you pass away from.' By turning safe assumptions inside out, Hobbs questions some of the longest-held ideas about racial identification within American society."—Catherine Clinton, Times Higher Education "Passing, as Allyson Hobbs describes in this brilliant, fascinating new study, is itself as fluid, complex, and contradictory as our ideas of race."—Kate Tuttle, The Boston Globe "By investigating the binary lives of the so-called ghosts that exist in American history, Hobbs raises important questions and ideas about race relations and the 'lost' histories of African American communities. "—Cicely Douglas, Library Journal "In narrating the lives of Americans at the border of whiteness, Hobbs illuminates our understanding of our country's tortured race history and of the injustices that drove people to make the ultimate migration—out of the tyranny of enslavement and the terrors of Jim Crow to the costly privilege of the larger white world. Their anguish, alienation, and constant fear of discovery are brilliantly and painfully rendered in this important book, and, through them, we see the arbitrariness of race and the origins of racial divisions that we live with to this day."—Isabel Wilkerson, author of The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration "With remarkable research and deep feeling for her subjects, Hobbs uncovers the stories of countless Americans of African descent who severed their family ties to pass into a world where they would be accorded the privileges of whites. At turns sad, inspiring, and provocative, the book raises important questions about the enduring power of race in American life."—Martha A. Sandweiss, author of Passing Strange: A Gilded Age Tale of Love and Deception Across the Color Line 
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20 HUNTER, TERA W. Bound In Wedlock: Slave And Free Black Marriage In The Nineteenth Century.
Belknap Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts: 2017. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Americans have long viewed marriage between a white man and a white woman as a sacred union. But marriages between African Americans have seldom been treated with the same reverence. This discriminatory legacy traces back to centuries of slavery, when the overwhelming majority of black married couples were bound in servitude as well as wedlock. Though their unions were not legally recognized, slaves commonly married, fully aware that their marital bonds would be sustained or nullified according to the whims of white masters. Bound in Wedlock is the first comprehensive history of African American marriage in the nineteenth century. Uncovering the experiences of African American spouses in plantation records, legal and court documents, and pension files, Tera W. Hunter reveals the myriad ways couples adopted, adapted, revised, and rejected white Christian ideas of marriage. Setting their own standards for conjugal relationships, enslaved husbands and wives were creative and, of necessity, practical in starting and supporting families under conditions of uncertainty and cruelty. After emancipation, white racism continued to menace black marriages. Laws passed during Reconstruction, ostensibly to secure the civil rights of newly freed African American citizens, were often coercive and repressive. Informal antebellum traditions of marriage were criminalized, and the new legal regime became a convenient tool for plantation owners to discipline agricultural workers. Recognition of the right of African Americans to enter into wedlock on terms equal to whites would remain a struggle into the Jim Crow era, and its legacy would resonate well into the twentieth century. 416 pages, 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches, 17 photos, 4 illustrations. Tera W. Hunter is Professor of History and African American Studies at Princeton University. "[A] remarkable book… Her powerful, meticulously researched book describes how the grinding demands of slavery, white standards of marriage and the steady retreat from the qualified gains of the Civil War not only posed abiding challenges to African-American families but also inspired in them a tenacious commitment to marriage… Through careful use of difficult legal sources and close reading of slave narratives, ex-slave interviews, government agency reports, congressional debates, pension records and church minutes, Hunter gives resonant voice to the often illiterate people she studies… Hunter has harvested stories of human resilience from the cruelest of soils. Bound in Wedlock is an impeccably crafted testament to the African-Americans whose ingenuity, steadfast love and hard-nosed determination protected black family life under the most trying of circumstances." —Mark M. Smith, Wall Street Journal "Dazzling… Hunter nudges the rich and raucous historiography on black marriage and black kinship in a new direction… Hunter's powerfully written social history calls our attention to a world that was lost in the transition from slavery to freedom. Far from a 'tangle of pathology,' the history of black intimate relationships Hunter captures in Bound in Wedlock illuminates the relentless efforts of those African Americans who, even in the face of overwhelming obstacles and oppression, shaped their intimate connections on their own terms and fought for a vision of marriage that could survive both slavery and freedom."—Robert D. Bland, H-Net Reviews "The unprecedented first comprehensive history of African American marriage in the nineteenth century… In this brilliantly researched book, Hunter examines the experiences of slave marriages as well as the marriages of free blacks. She also looks at the ways in which married couples rejected the Christian ideals of marriage."—Vibe "An important and comprehensive work that is worth reading by all, especially those interested in the affects of slavery on society today."—Amy Lewontin, Library Journal (starred review) "In this extraordinary book, Tera Hunter builds on vast research to discern the resilient marriage forms that African Americans devised during the nineteenth century to cope with the havoc of bondage, the fleeting promise of emancipation, and the fresh compulsions that came with freedom. Written with eloquence, teeming with evidence, comprehensive in its sweep, challenging in its conclusions, Bound in Wedlock is a momentous achievement."—Sydney Nathans, author of A Mind to Stay: White Plantation, Black Homeland "Tera Hunter's fascinating and intensive assessment of slave and free marriages in the nineteenth century details powerfully both the supreme importance of kinship relations and the complex ways that the persistence of post-Civil War white supremacy vexed and hampered African American family integrity even more directly than legacies of slavery did."—Nancy F. Cott, author of Public Vows: A History of Marriage and the Nation "Bound in Wedlock is a groundbreaking history that challenges the belief that the crisis of black marital and familial relations can be traced directly to slavery. With a vast arsenal of archival evidence, Hunter illuminates the complex and flexible character of black intimacy and kinship and the precariousness of marriage in the context of racial and economic inequality. It is a brilliant book and one destined to invite vigorous debate."—Saidiya Hartman, author of Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route "Bound in Wedlock demonstrates that the history of African American marriage is far more than a legacy of slavery. Instead, it is a story at once rooted in a distinctive collective experience, intensely personal, and at the same time bound up in the legal, social, and cultural transformations that re-made marriage for all Americans. Wide-ranging, learned, and deeply researched, it is a splendid accomplishment."—Dylan C. Penningroth, University of California, Berkeley, and the American Bar Foundation 
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