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WEATHER.

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1 DEMPSEY, MICHAEL W. (EDITOR-IN-CHIEF). The World Of Weather & Climate.
Young Readers Press, New York: 1971. Reprint Edition. Young Readers Press Reference Library Books Series. s Softcover. Good condition. 
An introduction to the study of weather and climate, their effects on man's life, and the techniques of weather forecasting. Over 80 full-color pictures. Includes an Index. 
Price: 9.50 USD
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2 EAKIN, HALLIE. Weathering Risk In Rural Mexico: Climatic, Institutional, And Economic Change.
University of Arizona Press, Tucson: 2016. s Softcover. Brand new book. 
From floods and droughts to tsunamis and hurricanes, recent years have seen a distressing and often devastating increase in extreme climatic events. While it is possible to study these disasters from a purely scientific perspective, a growing preponderance of evidence suggests that changes in the environment are related to both a shift in global economic relations and these weather-related disasters. In Weathering Risk in Rural Mexico, Hallie Eakin draws on ethnographic data collected in three agricultural communities in rural Mexico to show how economic and climatic change not only are linked in cause and effect at the planetary scale but also interact in unpredictable and complex ways in the context of regional political and trade relationships, national economic and social programs, and the decision-making of institutions, enterprises, and individuals. She shows how the parallel processes of globalization and climatic change result in populations that are "doubly exposed" and thus particularly vulnerable. Chapters trace the effects of El NiĖo in central Mexico in the late 1990s alongside some of the principal changes in the country's agricultural policy. Eakin argues that in order to develop policies that effectively address rural poverty and agricultural development, we need an improved understanding of how households cope simultaneously with various sources of uncertainty and adjust their livelihoods to accommodate evolving environmental, political, and economic realities. "An excellent, intelligent, and beautifully crafted volume."—Latin American Studies "This is a subtle but powerful book. . . . Both academics and students will find this book readable and thought-provoking, and its findings will hopefully influence policy debates in years to come."—Royal Geographical Society 
Price: 28.45 USD
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3 FISCHBECK, DR. GEORGE WITH ROACH, RANDY. Dr. George: My Life In Weather.
University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque: 2014. s For twenty-three years, George Fischbeck was a schoolteacher in Albuquerque, and for the last thirteen of those years taught science on a public television station that was beamed all over New Mexico. He also served as a weatherman on Albuquerque's top-rated TV newscast where he was so popular that the general manager of a competing station sent tapes of his weather forecasts to all the top ABC Network stations nationwide in hope that one would hire George and get him out of New Mexico. When KABC-TV in Los Angeles responded, it was the start of a love affair between Dr. George and the City of Angels that continues to this day. Not only has Fischbeck had a long career as an awardwinning journalist and educator, he has also helped raise millions of dollars for a variety of charitable causes. His story is all here, and the best part is what the fewest people know: the heartwarming memories of a family man. A recipient of both the Governors Award from the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences and a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Radio and Television News Association of Southern California, George Fischbeck has served as a science educator and television meteorologist for more than fifty years. Journalist Randy Roach worked for KABC-TV in Los Angeles for thirty-five years. He has won five Emmy Awards and three Golden Mike Awards for his producing and writing. "Dr. George's place in television news broadcasting is unprecedented. When Dr. George's reports came along, it was out with the old and in with the new. He established the vital link for the viewer that weather was a science. And he engaged us with his professorial instincts. Dr. George has laid much of the groundwork of what our best TV meteorologists exemplify today." -- Stan Chambers, KTLA News, Los Angeles "As a young student in New Mexico, I watched Dr. George on TV, and as a TV news anchor in Los Angeles, I watched him become a TV icon. From teacher to TV star, Dr. George's story is one incredible life lesson of how to truly make a difference in the world." -- Carla Aragon, author and former news anchor, KNBC-TV and KOB-TV "Dr. George is the eternal teacher, philosopher, and friend. Here he continues his lifelong passion, teaching. His book continues those lessons not only about science and weather, but about love, life, and living each day." -- Heidi Bundy Brown, Santa Fe Productions 6 x 9 in. 256 pages 77 halftones 
For twenty-three years, George Fischbeck was a schoolteacher in Albuquerque, and for the last thirteen of those years taught science on a public television station that was beamed all over New Mexico. He also served as a weatherman on Albuquerque's top-rated TV newscast where he was so popular that the general manager of a competing station sent tapes of his weather forecasts to all the top ABC Network stations nationwide in hope that one would hire George and get him out of New Mexico. When KABC-TV in Los Angeles responded, it was the start of a love affair between Dr. George and the City of Angels that continues to this day. Not only has Fischbeck had a long career as an awardwinning journalist and educator, he has also helped raise millions of dollars for a variety of charitable causes. His story is all here, and the best part is what the fewest people know: the heartwarming memories of a family man. A recipient of both the Governors Award from the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences and a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Radio and Television News Association of Southern California, George Fischbeck has served as a science educator and television meteorologist for more than fifty years. Journalist Randy Roach worked for KABC-TV in Los Angeles for thirty-five years. He has won five Emmy Awards and three Golden Mike Awards for his producing and writing. "Dr. George's place in television news broadcasting is unprecedented. When Dr. George's reports came along, it was out with the old and in with the new. He established the vital link for the viewer that weather was a science. And he engaged us with his professorial instincts. Dr. George has laid much of the groundwork of what our best TV meteorologists exemplify today." -- Stan Chambers, KTLA News, Los Angeles "As a young student in New Mexico, I watched Dr. George on TV, and as a TV news anchor in Los Angeles, I watched him become a TV icon. From teacher to TV star, Dr. George's story is one incredible life lesson of how to truly make a difference in the world." -- Carla Aragon, author and former news anchor, KNBC-TV and KOB-TV "Dr. George is the eternal teacher, philosopher, and friend. Here he continues his lifelong passion, teaching. His book continues those lessons not only about science and weather, but about love, life, and living each day." -- Heidi Bundy Brown, Santa Fe Productions 
Price: 23.70 USD
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4 FLANNERY, TIM. The Weather Makers: How Man Is Changing The Climate And What It Means For Life On Earth.
Atlantic Monthly Press, New York: 2006. 0871139359 / 9780871139351 First American Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Very good condition. 
Both an urgent warning and a call to arms, outlining the history of climate change, how it will unfold over the new century, and what we can do to prevent a cataclysmic future. Pulling on his expertise as a scientist to discuss climate change from a historical perspective, Flannery also explains how it is interconnected across the planet. "At last, here is a clear and readable account of one of the most controversial issues facing everyone in the world today." - Jared Diamond. 
Price: 5.80 USD
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5 KEIM, BARRY D. & MULLER, ROBERT A. Hurricanes Of The Gulf Of Mexico.
Louisiana State University Press, Baton Rouge and London: 2009. First Edition. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
"The storm has entered the Gulf." For those who live or travel near the Gulf of Mexico, this ominous announcement commands attention, especially given the frequency and force of hurricane strikes in recent years. Since 2004, the shores around the Gulf of Mexico have been in the crosshairs for an increasing number of hurricanes and tropical storms, including Charley and Wilma in southwestern Florida and Ivan, Dennis, Katrina, Rita, Gustav, and Ike along the northern Gulf coast from Panama City to near Galveston. In this definitive guide, climatologists Barry D. Keim and Robert A. Muller examine the big picture of Gulf hurricanes—from the 1800s to the present and from Key West, Florida, to Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula — providing an extraordinary compilation and interpretation of the entire region's hurricane and tropical storm history. Drawing from their own research and from National Hurricane Center records, Keim and Muller examine numerous individual Gulf storms, considering each hurricane's origin, oceanic and atmospheric influences, seasonality, track, intensity, size, point of landfall, storm surge, and impact on life, property, and the environment. They describe the unique features of the Gulf that influence the development of hurricanes, such as the loop current and its eddies, and identify areas of the coastline that are more or less vulnerable because of physical environment, socioeconomic environment, or both. They point out that the increase in population along the Gulf Coast over the past century has led to a rise in hurricane damage as once sparse coastlines are now lined with residents, commerce, and industry. In addition, they assess predicted hurricane activity for coming years in light of competing climate theories as well as cyclical patterns over the past century. Keim and Muller begin their book by scrutinizing the Gulf's deadliest storm, the Galveston Hurricane of 1900, whose victims received little to no warning of its approach. They then retrace 2005's Hurricane Katrina, the most costly storm, using NHC advisories and reports. Their comparison of these two catastrophic events shows that despite 105 years of tremendous technological advances, hurricanes remain ultimately rather unpredictable and human warning, readiness, and response measures continue to be imperfect. Keim and Muller also detail other memorable Gulf storms—the Labor Day Hurricane of 1935, Audrey, Betsy, Camille, Gilbert, Andrew, Wilma, and more—and give the hurricane strike records from 1901 to 2005 at thirty locations around the Gulf. They extend the New Orleans hurricane strike record back to the middle of the nineteenth century, providing key insight into comparisons of storm activities during the two centuries. An epilogue summarizes the destructive 2008 hurricane season, including storms Dolly, Gustav, and Ike. Plentiful maps, charts, tables, graphs, and photos, along with anecdotal observations and an informative text, make Hurricanes of the Gulf of Mexico a captivating and useful volume for Gulf residents, storm trackers, or anyone fascinated by the weather. A native of Chalmette, Louisiana, Barry D. Keim remembers the lasting impression Hurricane Camille made on him as a boy in 1969. In 2005, Hurricane Katrina destroyed his childhood home. He is Louisiana State Climatologist, a professor of geography at Louisiana State University, and coauthor of New England Weather, New England Climate and Rainfall Frequency/Magnitude Atlas for the South-Central United States. He lives in Baton Rouge. A native of northern New Jersey, Robert A. Muller experienced the Great New England Hurricane of 1938. He is a professor emeritus of geography at Louisiana State University, former Louisiana State Climatologist, past director of the NOAA Southern Regional Climate Center at LSU, and the coauthor of Essentials of Physical Geography Today and Physical Geography Today: A Portrait of a Planet. He lives in Baton Rouge. 
Price: 28.45 USD
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6 KIMBLE, GEORGE; BUSH, RAYMOND. The Weather.
Penguin Books, New York: 1944. Second printing. s Softcover. Reading copy. Front cover is creased. 
Not only gives a thorough insight into how the professional weather forecaster works, it also tells how the ordinary person can read the weather signs and become a fairly accurate forecaster himself. 
Price: 1.00 USD
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7 LEHR, PAUL E., BURNETT, R. WILL & ZIM, HERBERT S. Weather: Air Masses - Clouds - Rainfall - Storms - Weather Maps - Climate.
Golden Press, New York: 1961. s Softcover. Fair condition. 
A guide to phenomena and forecasts. 301 illustrations in full color. Contains concise, double-checked information which makes identification and understanding the subject easy and enjoyable. Includes an Index. 
Price: 3.13 USD
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8 MERGEN, BERNARD. Snow In America.
Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington: 1997. 1560987804 / 9781560987802 First Printing. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Very good condition. 
In this first cultural history of snow, Bernard Mergen explores our ambivalent relatrionship with nature's crystalline gift. Drawing from works of art, poetry, literature, film, history, and public policy, the author demonstrates how Americans have loved, hated, measured, depicted, and frolicked in snow for over three hundred years, attaching to it a host of shifting meanings and metaphors. Includes an Index. 
Price: 14.92 USD
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9 MERGEN, BERNARD. Weather Matters: An American Cultural History Since 1900.
University Press of Kansas, Lawrence: . h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
Everybody talks about it—and why not? From tornadoes in the Heartland to hurricanes in the Gulf, blizzards in the Midwest to droughts across the South, weather matters to Americans and makes a difference in their daily lives. Bernard Mergen's captivating and kaleidoscopic new book illuminates our inevitable obsession with weather—as both physical reality and evocative metaphor—in all of its myriad forms, focusing on the ways in which it is perceived, feared, embraced, managed, and even marketed. From the roaring winds atop Mount Washington to the reflective calm of the poet's lair, he takes a long-overdue look at public response to weather in art, literature, and the media. In the process, he reveals the cross-pollination of ideas and perceptions about weather across many fields, including science, government, education, and consumer culture. Rich in detail and anecdote, Weather Matters is filled with eccentric characters, quirky facts, and vividly drawn events. Mergen elaborates on the curious question of the "butterfly effect," tracing the notion to a 1918 suggestion that a grasshopper in Idaho could cause a devastating storm in New York City. He chronicles the history of the U.S. Weather Bureau and the American Meteorological Society and their struggles for credibility, as well as the rise of private meteorology and weather modification—including the military's flirtation with manipulating weather as a weapon. And he recounts an eight-day trip with storm chasers, a gripping tale of weather at its fiercest that shows scientists putting their lives at stake in the pursuit of data. Ultimately, Mergen contends that the popularity of weather as a topic of conversation can be found in its quasi-religious power: the way it illuminates the paradoxes of order and disorder in daily life—a way of understanding the roles of chance, scientific law, and free will that makes our experience of weather uniquely American. Brimming with new insights into familiar experiences, Weather Matters makes phenomena like Hurricane Katrina and global warming at once more understandable and more troubling—examples of our inability to really control the environment—as it gives us a new way of looking at our everyday world. 
Price: 33.20 USD
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10 SCHNEIDER, HERMAN. Everyday Weather And How It Works.
McGraw-Hill Book Company, New York: 1951. Third Printing. h Hardcover, no dustjacket. Very good reading copy. Library discard. 

Price: 475.00 USD
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11 WATTS, ALAN. Instant Weather Forecasting.
Dodd, Mead & Company, New York: 1968. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Fair condition. Dustjacket has slight scratches. 
Here's a revolutionary book with twenty-four color cloud pictures which is a basic guide to forecasting the weather hours ahead and provides information on what likely weather trends will be. 
Price: 11.88 USD
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12 WHITE, SAM. A Cold Welcome: The Little Ice Age And Europe's Encounter With North America.
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts and London England: 2017. h Hardcover with dustjacket. Brand new book. 
When Europeans first arrived in North America, they faced a cold new world. The average global temperature had dropped to lows unseen in millennia, and its effects were stark and unpredictable: blizzards and deep freezes, droughts and famines, and winters when even the Rio Grande froze. This period of climate change has come to be known as the Little Ice Age, and it played a decisive role in Europe's encounter with the lands and peoples of North America. In A Cold Welcome, Sam White tells the story of this crucial period in world history, from Europe's earliest expeditions in an unfamiliar landscape to the perilous first winters at Santa Fe, Quebec, and Jamestown. Weaving together evidence from climatology, archaeology, and the written historical record, White describes how the severity and volatility of the Little Ice Age climate threatened to freeze and starve out the Europeans' precarious new settlements. Lacking basic provisions and wholly unprepared to fend for themselves under such harsh conditions, Europeans suffered life-threatening privation, and their desperation precipitated violent conflict with Native Americans. In the twenty-first century, as we confront an uncertain future from global warming, A Cold Welcome reminds us of the risks of a changing and unfamiliar climate. Sam White is Associate Professor in the Department of History at The Ohio State University. About This Book About the Authors Reviews Table of Contents "In his deeply researched and exciting new book, A Cold Welcome, the historian Sam White focuses on the true stories of the English, Spanish, and French colonial expeditions in North America. He tells strange and surprising tales of drought, famine, bitterly cold winters, desperation, and death, while anchoring his research in the methods and results of the science of climate change and historical climatology… He weaves an intricate, complex tapestry as he examines the effects both of climate—meteorological conditions over relatively long periods of time—and of weather—the conditions of the atmosphere over a short term—on vulnerable colonists in North America in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries… His fresh account of the climatic forces shaping the colonization of North America differs significantly from long-standing interpretations of those early calamities." —Susan Dunn, The New York Review of Books "White presents a fascinating account of Europeans' 16th and early 17th century incursions into North America to highlight that colonial exploration was impeded by famines, diseases, afflictions and deaths for the British, the French, and the Spanish as they faced storms, icy winters, hurricanes, droughts, and extreme cold spells… In making climate history and climate reconstruction part of a contextualized historical inquiry, White not only stresses what was, but also implies what could have been for the early European expansion into Northern America… Beautifully written and skillfully researched, this book is highly relevant for scholars interested in the ways in which colonial history has been shaped at the intersection of human societies and the natural world, and more widely for all who seek to understand the consequences of present-day climate change on contemporary and future human communities… White's book constitutes a reminder of the deleterious effects of uncontrolled climatic variations throughout social history, and yet another warning."—HlŹne B. Ducros, EuropeNow "An environmental historian by trade, [White] has produced a highly readable study of how people struggled to exist and gain a foothold in unfamiliar lands."—Brian Renvall, Library Journal "In the barbarous early years of European colonization of North America, there have long been three acknowledged Horsemen of the Apocalypse: poor planning, cultural incomprehension, and bad timing. Sam White reminds us of a fourth deadly rider: climate change. His analysis of the Little Ice Age in North America makes the crucial point that failure to understand and adapt to climate change has been fatal."—Joyce E. Chaplin, author of Round About the Earth "Sam White's aptly named A Cold Welcome is a remarkable journey through the complex impacts of the Little Ice Age on Colonial North America. His compelling narrative takes the study of early America in a new, and potentially highly important, direction that delves into a now vanished world of daunting climatic extremes. This beautifully written, important book leaves us in no doubt that we ignore the chronicle of past climate change at our peril. I found it hard to put down."—Brian Fagan, author of The Little Ice Age "The period from 1492 to 1620 is the 'forgotten century' in American history, with most textbooks offering only a passing mention to early European exploration and settlement in North America. In fact, there were dozens of attempts to penetrate the continent, but all ended in starvation, disease, violence, and death. In A Cold Welcome, White explains how the Little Ice Age contributed to these failures. By combining archival research with the latest findings of climate scientists, he makes a brilliant contribution to both American and environmental history."—Daniel Headrick, author of Power over Peoples "A Cold Welcome deserves a warm reception from anyone interested in colonial America, the early modern Atlantic, or the history of changing climates. Taking a holistic view of North America, White brilliantly illuminates the history of early Spanish, French, and English settlements as they struggled to come to grips with unexpected climates and a challenging spell during the Little Ice Age." —J. R. McNeill, coauthor of The Great Acceleration 
Price: 28.45 USD
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